The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

 

The Burren

Sites in this group:

6 posts
An Ráth Rath
7 posts
Aughinish Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Ballyallaban Bullaun Stone
2 posts
Ballycasheen Portal Tomb
6 posts
1 site
Ballyelly Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner North Court Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner North II Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Ballyganner North III Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner South Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Ballyganner South Souterrain
Ballykinvarga Stone Fort / Dun
Baur North Wedge Tomb
10 posts
3 sites
Baur South Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Berneens Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Boloona Wedge Tomb
22 posts
Cahercommaun Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Caherconnell Stone Fort / Dun
4 posts
Caherdooneerish Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Cahermackirilla Stone Row / Alignment
5 posts
Cahermacnaghten Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Carran Cairn(s)
4 posts
Castletown Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Clooneen Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Coolnatullagh Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Coolnatullagh Ring Cairn
2 posts
Coolnatullagh Cairn(s)
31 posts
Creevagh Wedge Tomb
12 posts
Derrynavahagh Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Eanty More Wedge Tomb
12 posts
Fanyglavin Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 3) Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 4) Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 5) Wedge Tomb
5 posts
Gleninagh North Wedge Tomb
20 posts
Gleninsheen Wedge Tomb
10 posts
Gleninsheen Wedge Tomb
1 post
Iskancullin Wedge Tomb
1 post
Lissateeaun Rath
2 posts
Lissylisheen Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Meggagh Wedge Tomb
1 post
Moheramoylan (Cl. 30) Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Poulaphuca Wedge Tomb
13 posts
2 sites
Poulawack Cairn(s)
66 posts
Poulnabrone Portal Tomb
2 posts
Rannagh West Wedge Tomb
Slievecarran Cairn(s)
4 posts
Slievenaglasha Wedge Tomb
5 posts
Teergonean Court Tomb
4 posts
Tullycommon Wedge Tomb
11 posts
Turlough Hill/Knockycallanan Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
7 posts
Turlough Hill/Knockycallanan Cairn(s)

News

Add news Add news

Bear skull from Aillwee Cave over 10,000yrs old


https://www.rte.ie/news/2018/0704/976284-bear-skull/
"New analysis of the skull of a brown bear discovered in Aillwee Cave in Co Clare over four decades ago has found that it is more than 10,400 years old... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
4th July 2018ce
Edited 4th July 2018ce

Mystery surrounds Burren settlement excavated by archaeologists


When a prehistoric people built a large settlement in the Burren up to 3,000 years ago, why did they choose a mountain-top with no running water?
Was it the closest point to a sky god, or was the location selected for some type of ancient gathering or “Dáil”?
“Truly one of the most enigmatic places in Irish prehistory” is how N... continues...
moss Posted by moss
2nd May 2016ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

Burren Ireland information monuments and history


Ringforts, monuments, archaeological Dig etc
bogman Posted by bogman
20th August 2010ce

Archaeology of the Burren: Prehistoric Forts and Dolmens in North Clare by Thomas Johnson Westropp


"The articles presented here contain a complete record of the prehistoric monuments of northern Clare which were surveyed, described and illustrated by Thomas J. Westropp. The articles were originally published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland between 1896 and 1916".
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th January 2006ce
Edited 9th January 2006ce

RTE items on The archaeology of The Burren


News items from 1999 on the discoveries in The Burren.
Check out the audio files. Archaeologists, historians and thr local farmer talk about the excavations, finds and significance of The Burren
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
14th February 2005ce

Burrenbeo - comprehensive guide of the Burren


Interactive interpretative story of the Burren, Ireland.
Posted by burrenbeo
11th October 2002ce

Latest posts for the Burren

Showing 1-10 of 468 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Derrynavahagh (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

The Caher river valley runs roughly north-south through the townland of Derrynavahagh. North of the townland there is a crossroads in Formoyle East where the Burren Way crosses, having descended from the northern slopes of Sliabh Eilbhe, heading east towards Gleninagh mountain. We had been further back along the Way earlier at Ballelly enclosure and wedge tomb, but had spun our way around back up through Fanore and onto the Caher Valley road. I had kind of a loose plan that had gone out the window a few sites back so here we were, south of the crossroads, in the thick hazel scrub that has colonised so many parts of the Burren.

There is probably a better, safer, easier way to Derrynavahagh wedge tomb, south from the Burren Way perhaps, across the limestone pavement, but hindsight is a great thing. Right now I had a carload of barely interested teenagers and a half-interested friend, and even though Derrynavahagh is one of the finest examples in the Burren, I was close to giving up when I asked, “well, are yous up for it or what?” Up for it, as it turned out, was climbing up from the road south of the crossroads, after we had found a spot where the scrub had thinned out. After a few shrugs, and a sort of explanation of what ‘it’ entailed, we headed up.

The Burren terrain rises and falls in a series of terraces. Often the climb from one terrace to the other is only 10 metres. From what I could make out from the satellite photo I had (ah the pleasures of modern technology), we’d have a series of three climbs and and a half a kilometre of a walk over varying ground. The ascent from the road to gain the first scrub-covered terrace was the hardest. The second ascent left us on our first bit of raw limestone pavement. This is what the Burren is really about and my companions were delighted. I headed for the third ascent and over to the tomb.

It’s semi-surrounded by a modern stone wall and is a stunner. Largely intact and isolated, it’s kind of an introverted megalithic explorers dream. It has the wedge shape, take-off and landing-strip profile that we all know and love. The massive capstone has broken at the rear of the chamber and doesn’t reach the backstone. There are a couple of slabs lying around that are or were part of the tomb but I couldn’t make out from whence they came. The triple walling on the eastern side is phenomenal, with the 2 metre tall standing stone beyond the chamber opening almost like a sentinel standing guard.

Aside from the magnificence of the tomb, the location has to be commented on. To the east the ridge rises towards Faunarooska townland with its three ruined tombs. West and south-west across the Caher river valley is the broad expanse of Sliabh Eilbhe, with its craggy terracing. North towards Black Head is Gleninagh mountain. It’s an area rich in isolated wonders and, without sounding like a tourist rep. or salesman, one could spend weeks here, lost in the mesmerising views both near and far, endlessly pondering the beauty and magnificence of the world.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th August 2020ce

Ballyelly (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

About a kilometre south of Fanore Beach a road climbs the lower northwest slopes of Sliabh Eilbhe in an almost southerly direction. This road meets the Burren Way walkers’ trail at Balliny North after about 2.5 kilometres. You can park here. Head back in a northeasterly direction along the Burren Way. The track is well walked and popular. It’s in that part of the Burren where there is still a thin cover of soil and vegetation, more dangerous for traversing than the denuded parts as the cover tends to hide the grykes that can result in a snapped ankle.

The walk to the enclosure, tomb and the hut site is about 2.5 kilometres of leisurely trekking. The stones and condition of the enclosure walls and the hut site are similar to those of the shattered and collapsed tomb. This could lead one to believe that they originate from the same era. I like to think that there was a bronze-age smallholding here which included the wedge tomb.

There’s not much to say about the tomb itself. It’s in a very collapsed state, but both sidetones seem to be there, along with a couple of roofslabs and a possible backstone. It is typical of the Burren wedge tomb class.

We spent a while here in the welcome but intermittent sunshine. The Burren terrain, like the Aran Islands to the west, seems to suck the noise of the world out of the atmosphere, enclosing the spirit in a bubble of peace and eeriness. We investigated the clochán about 250 metres to the south-east and then headed back to the track via the enclosure.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
6th August 2020ce

Derrynavahagh (Wedge Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
6th August 2020ce
Showing 1-10 of 468 posts. Most recent first | Next 10