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<b>Northern Ireland</b>Posted by Howburn DiggerImage © Howburn Digger
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Huge ringed fort is thought to date back 4,500 years to Neolithic times


Archeologists are probing a Neolithic henge in the middle of Aghagallon which they believe dates back more than 4,500 years. It the reason why Aghagallon has its name and now the Standing Stone is to be given its proper place in history... continues...
moss Posted by moss
9th March 2015ce

Ballymaglaff Stone Age site 'lost because of planning error'


DoE probes claims of unsuitable dig prior to developers moving in

BY LINDA STEWART – 03 JUNE 2014

Planners have launched a probe following claims that a rare site where early humans settled has been badly damaged without carrying out proper archaeological investigation... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
7th June 2014ce

'No-go zone' imposed around Enniskillen crannog


The environment minister has imposed a "no-go zone" around a historical site which was found during the construction of a new road in County Fermanagh.

Ancient human remains and pottery were unearthed at the site in Enniskillen... continues...
moss Posted by moss
31st July 2012ce

Neolithic Man Puts Bypass On Hold

Thousands of years ago our Neolithic forebears were hunting for wild game with flint arrows overlooking what is now Ballymena.

by Linda Stewart 3/3/2010.

More at:

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/neolithic-man-puts-bypass-on-hold-14705308.html

Cheers Stevie!
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th March 2010ce

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<b>Northern Ireland</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

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Historic Environment Map Viewer


The latest incarnation of the map viewer, at the Department for Communities website.
The links are supposed to bring up information on the NISMR. But you can always search the latterhere if not.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Latest posts for Northern Ireland

Showing 1-10 of 1,027 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Mullynavale (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

The Tomb of Bith

From the archaic strata of Irish myth concerning the original settlement of Ireland, as recorded in 'Lebor Gabála', the first man and woman to land were Adra – The Ancient (alias Ladra) – and his sister Cesair, with their father, Bith, together with a number of subordinate women.

Bith traveled north through Ireland from the Munster landing place and then died at Slieve Beagh, on the Ulster mountain named after him. There the "seventeen magnificent maidens" who accompanied him on the journey to the northern province buried him under the mountain-top cairn they constructed, the Carn More or Great Cairn.

The Irish word 'bith' means "cosmos, world, eternity, everlasting, being and existence." Thus his name, his body, and his cairn carry the load of the entire universe. He brings a truly cosmogonic myth to the southern fringe of Ulster.

From "Ireland, A Sacred Journey" by Michael Dames (Element Books 2000), first published as "Mythic Ireland" by Thames and Hudson, 1992.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th February 2020ce

St Patrick's Chair and Well (Bullaun Stone) — Folklore

Altadavin - St. Patrick's Altar and Chair.

Altadavin though belonging to this parish of Errigal Truagh is situated in the County Tyrone. It is a picturesque wooded glen. Various explanations of the name have been given:- "The high place of Daimen." Daimen was high King of Airghialla 513 AD. It also means "Glen of the Gods" or "Glen of the Demons."

The glen is entered by a narrow path running by a clear stream, the precipitous sides being clothed with a dense growth of under wood surmounted with stately forest trees. About midway down the glen, a vast mass of rock, some three or four hundred yards long, covered with wood of natural growth, rises up leaving a choice of paths in the two narrow ravines. Keeping to the right a little green velvet lawn opens out before us. Right under the rock, that rises sheer and steep from the green sword, is a spring well issuing from a stone.

This lovely glen has an interesting history, a mingling of the older and the newer faiths. Tradition has it that in Pagan times the glen was sacred to the rites of Druidism. It is a very reasonable probability that St Patrick, on one of his visits to Clogher, made it his object to overthrow this centre of Druidical Cult, and following his usual course, dedicated this home of heathenism to the true God. Here, surrounded by tangled under wood is a rude altar formed of solid rock. The ledge that forms its table is four feet high, six feet long and two feet wide. Towards its centre is roughly chiselled to a smooth surface. It shows no other tool marks.

Opposite the Gospel side of the altar is a large rock, in the form of a high-backed chair, known as St Patrick's chair. The seat of this natural chair is about four feet high from the present ground level, and the back rises to a height of eight feet from the ground.

On a rocky platform overlooking the stretch of green, and some twenty feet above it, is a large square stone about five feet high in the top of which is scooped out a basin fourteen inches in diameter and twelve inches deep. There is a detached boulder sitting on other detached boulders, yet the basin on the driest summer day is to be found half full of water. It is affirmed that as often as it is emptied, it will, with in half an hour, fill up to the same level, and except as a result of rainfall, will not rise to a higher level. Science has not yet explained whence the water comes, or why it rises to a certain height. That it does so is an undoubted fact, and equally undoubted is the fact that no natural source of supply can be discovered.

Local tradition affirms that when St Patrick turned this stronghold of Druidism to Christianity, he was attended by a great concourse of people. Having converted large numbers of them, he proceeded to baptise them. Water was necessary. Here at hand was a font, and what surer method of strengthening the faith of those who still wavered, than by drawing water from a rock. He did so and the font has never since dried up.

The wooded glories of Altadaven have departed, the venerable timber that shaded the glen and that lent enchantment to the scene have been cut down and turned into money. However the Department of Forestry of the Government of 'N. Ireland' have replanted Altadavan, but many, many years must elapse ere the charm of by gone days can return.
Altadaven still holds a high place in the popular respect for many miles around, when crowds assemble at the time that the blae-berries are ripe, which usually falls about the last Sunday in July and first Sunday in August, known in the district as "the Big Sundays".

Last Sunday was one of the "big Sundays". I was there and I saw crowds and crowds of boys and girls all enjoying themselves, laughing, courting, singing, and dancing, some picking the ripe blae-berries, some climbing up to see St Patricks altar and chair, all wearing happy faces and enjoying themselves to their hearts' content. I went to see St Patrick's Well. It is near the chair, but a little further down in the rocks. There was a great number of pins and needles and hair pins in it, also a few coppers left by those who made a "Wish" at the Well.

Cathleen Sweeney 4th August1938.
From the Schools Collection, now being digitised at Duchas.ie. Elsewhere the special days at Altadavin are just called "Blaeberry Sundays".
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th February 2020ce

Aghmakane (Portal Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Two fields in from the very busy Halls Road, south-east of Camlough, are the remains of what once could have been a very fine portal tomb. It's probably not one of the most enticing sites, but the fact that there is a relatively fine cashel built right beside it makes it that little bit more intriguing.

What remains are the western portal, a full-size doorstone and the stump of the eastern portal, abutted to the wall of the cashel. There are what looks like an amount of cairn material around the base of the stones. Which begs the question: did the cashel buliders destroy the tomb and use the material to build the cashel? And if so, why did they leave what remains standing? Or was the tomb already destroyed before the cashel builders arrived, and they used the site because they believed it a place of power? Or maybe the full tomb was there when the cashel was built and was then destroyed in more modern times. Or finally, maybe the remains are not those of a portal tomb at all. Who knows?

The views from the site, inside the ring of Gullion, are pleasant – Camlough mountain to the south-east, Sturgan mountain to the north. The ground slopes up to the west, downward to the east towards Camlough itself. Not the easiest of access here due to the traffic on the road, but still worthwhile.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
2nd February 2020ce

Annaghmare (Court Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Annaghmare</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Annaghmare</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
1st February 2020ce

Aghmakane (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Aghmakane</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Aghmakane</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Aghmakane</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Aghmakane</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
1st February 2020ce

Ardtole (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Ardtole</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
26th January 2020ce
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