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Northern Ireland

<b>Northern Ireland</b>Posted by Howburn DiggerImage © Howburn Digger
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Sligo’s Neolithic tombs are being vandalised ‘on scale never seen before’


Five-thousand-year-old Neolithic tombs in Co Sligo are suffering damage and vandalism “on a scale never seen before” and will not survive unless action is taken immediately, archaeological experts have warned... continues...
moss Posted by moss
23rd July 2020ce

Huge ringed fort is thought to date back 4,500 years to Neolithic times


Archeologists are probing a Neolithic henge in the middle of Aghagallon which they believe dates back more than 4,500 years. It the reason why Aghagallon has its name and now the Standing Stone is to be given its proper place in history... continues...
moss Posted by moss
9th March 2015ce

Ballymaglaff Stone Age site 'lost because of planning error'


DoE probes claims of unsuitable dig prior to developers moving in

BY LINDA STEWART – 03 JUNE 2014

Planners have launched a probe following claims that a rare site where early humans settled has been badly damaged without carrying out proper archaeological investigation... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
7th June 2014ce

'No-go zone' imposed around Enniskillen crannog


The environment minister has imposed a "no-go zone" around a historical site which was found during the construction of a new road in County Fermanagh.

Ancient human remains and pottery were unearthed at the site in Enniskillen... continues...
moss Posted by moss
31st July 2012ce

Neolithic Man Puts Bypass On Hold

Thousands of years ago our Neolithic forebears were hunting for wild game with flint arrows overlooking what is now Ballymena.

by Linda Stewart 3/3/2010.

More at:

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/neolithic-man-puts-bypass-on-hold-14705308.html

Cheers Stevie!
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th March 2010ce

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<b>Northern Ireland</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

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PRONI Historical Maps Viewer


Historical Ordnance Survey NI maps with stones and so on marked, courtesy of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th August 2020ce
Edited 11th August 2020ce

Latest posts for Northern Ireland

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Ossian's Grave (Court Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Ossian's Grave</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Ossian's Grave</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Ossian's Grave</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Ossian's Grave</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Ossian's Grave</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
2nd August 2021ce

Ballycleagh (Standing Stones) — Fieldnotes

Not much to add to minipixel’s observations – these are two really fantastic stones in utterly modern, prosaic surroundings, accessible in a roadside grazing field, beside the driveway down to some holiday homes. They really are well worth checking out if you can ignore the closeness of the fence and the dullness of the setting – the stones make a statement of their own, bulky and with a sense of permanence. The beach at the bottom of the lane seems fine – the Cushendall and Cushendun area is popular without being over-populated, yet. ryaner Posted by ryaner
28th July 2021ce

Cushendun Caravan Park (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

“Can I help you?” asked the owner of the caravan park as we wandered over to the stone near the entrance. “Do you mind if I take a picture of that?” asked I. “Aha, you’re here to see the druid stone.” “Yes.” “There’s quite a few of them hereabouts.” “There is.” It’s at times like these that I’m glad my mate Thomas is with me, much better at talk of druids and suchlike than I. The stone, a large slab 1.8 metres tall and 1.5 metres wide (at it widest) is now being swallowed up by clematis and other garden plants. It’s not a bad garden feature – who wouldn’t like to have one – but I kept thoughts of breathing space and all the rest of it to myself. ryaner Posted by ryaner
27th July 2021ce

Deer Park Farms (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Dunteige wedge tomb is 3 kilometres south back down the road, Ault or Gowkstown wedge tomb is 200 metres across the road and then there’s this, a 1.3 metre tall standing stone that may or may not have been a supporting stone for a megalithic chamber, other stones, now removed, having been reported in earlier times. Again Slemish sits on the horizon to the south-east. The baying hounds in the farmyard beside the field with the wedge tomb put us off attempting a visit. ryaner Posted by ryaner
27th July 2021ce

Dunteige (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

I had only a short time at Dunteige wedge tomb. The field in which it lies was full of sheep and there were hordes of them on the road, coming down from the pass at Linford where we’d parked the car to head over to Ballygilbert. I didn’t think that they were going to come down this far but the sound of thousands of the little wooly feckers started to intrude on my visit after about 10 minutes.

The remains sit on a small rise north of the road. The ground falls away again before continuing to rise northwards up to Craigy Hill on the slopes of which is a court tomb (some other time). Much of the structure of the wedge tomb survives – double walling on the north side, with 10 large boulders on the outside, a narrow gallery/chamber, and double walling on the south side, though this is less visible as there in much cairn rubble in the gap between the chamber wall and the outer wall.

The tomb is aligned north-west/south-east with the top of Slemish just peeping over the horizon directly along the alignment. Though the site is fine it wasn’t great on atmospherics in the scorching sun and it was a mildly frustrating visit given all the sheep. I ended up running back down to the car as the white baaing tsunami come down from the pass in a torrent, escaping their killer clutches just in time.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
27th July 2021ce

Ballygilbert (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

We pulled into the parking place at the 279 metre contour along the Ulster Way on the road above Ballygally and Cairncastle. East-south-east from here is Knock Dhu with its promontory fort. Below its northern cliffs is a semi-permanent film set from the early episodes of Game of Thrones. The area is at the southern edge of the Glens of Antrim and the view east is fantastic.

We hadn’t planned on visiting Ballygilbert – we were on our way to Dunteige wedge tomb up the road – but I had Fourwind’s book with me and I asked my mate Thomas if he fancied a three kilometre walk to a surprisingly cool stone. He said yes and so off we set north along the way.

The way marked path crosses two peaks, rising first to Ballycoos at 361 metres, then down into a slight dip and back up to Scawt Hill at 378. I’d thought that once we’d gained Scawt we’d be almost there but no, there’s a steep descent north of the peak and the stone is another kilometre and a half further on. However, we had fantastic weather and the views were amazing and it was from the peak of Scawt that we first caught sight of Scotland, the Rhinns of Galloway visible on the horizon due east.

The ground is wild heathland and is farmed, mostly sheep but some cattle. Stiles allow you to traverse the walls and fences. We ploughed on, determined and blown away by the beauty of the views then gained the stone after about three quarters of an hour. And what a stone! It’s 1.6 metres tall, the top 60 or so centimetres a large bulbous glans. Fnarr fnarring aside this was well worth the effort. How a stone with this obviously phallic form has survived down through the ages given the religious bollocks (ahem) that has swept the land around here is one of megalithic Ireland’s happier tales. Awesome stone, awesome place.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
26th July 2021ce
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