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Middleton Muir 1 (Kerbed Cairn)

After a good look round Carnashach Wood I headed west staying south of the dry stane dyke on mostly dry land, wooded areas, jumping a couple of fences before reaching the heather of the Middleton Muir. Follow a fence as it heads north west, this almost leads to two cairns.

It must have been a large cairn at some point but after being well robbed it is now about 11m wide and 0.6m tall. Many kerbs remain in place, many turf covered, I counted 17 just about visible out of a 32 still in place.

Good views south including the Lomonds in Fife.

Visited 11/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st July 2020ce

Laganabeastie East (Cairn(s))

Laganabeastie Cairns can be found adjacent to the single track road to Lagafater Lodge, a large isolated holiday house in Dumfries and Galloway. The East & West cairns are located only 50 yards apart on the edge of moorland separated by a dry stane dyke.
Scant details of Laganabeastie East are available on Canmore ID 61900 (go to Links). It is described as “ a cairn, measuring 17.3m in diameter and 1.5m in height”.
The cairn has been heavily robbed on the S side leaving an excavated hollow and scattered stones behind. It measures approximately 20 yards on the EW axis by 2 yards high. It is still recognisable as a cairn despite the desecrations.
Directions: Take the un-signposted single track road 400 yards N of the Innermessan Junction on the A77 to Stranraer. Continue for 5 miles across moorland until you reach Penwhirn Reservoir and Filter Station. Take the next L across a bridge just after the Filter Station. This is a dead end single track road leading to Lagafater Lodge. Follow this narrow road for 2.5 miles until you reach an exposed stone bridge. Park in the next passing place. The Laganabeastie Cairns can be seen on the R in a rough pasture surrounded by a dry stane dyke. If you reach a Private Road sign you have gone too far. Turn around and the cairns will be on your L after around 500 yards.
Posted by markj99
20th July 2020ce
Edited 25th July 2020ce

Laganabeastie West (Cairn(s))

Laganabeastie Cairns can be found adjacent to the single track road to Lagafater Lodge, a large isolated holiday house in Dumfries and Galloway. The East & West cairns are located only 50 yards apart on the edge of moorland separated by a dry stane dyke.
Laganbeastie West is an undisturbed cairn listed as Canmore ID 61881 (go to Links). It is around 20 yards EW axis by 2 yards high , however, it is covered in grass with stones only visible on the summit. It’s possible that Laganabeastie Cairns East & West would been twins in the prehistoric landscape.
Directions: Take the un-signposted single track road 400 yards N of the Innermessan Junction on the A77 to Stranraer. Continue for 5 miles across moorland until you reach Penwhirn Reservoir and Filter Station. Take the next L across a bridge just after the Filter Station. This is a dead end single track road leading to Lagafater Lodge. Follow this narrow road for 2.5 miles until you reach an exposed stone bridge. Park in the next passing place. The Laganabeastie Cairns can be seen on the R in a rough pasture surrounded by a dry stane dyke. If you reach a Private Road sign you have gone too far. Turn around and the cairns will be on your L after around 500 yards.
Posted by markj99
20th July 2020ce
Edited 25th July 2020ce

Carnashach Wood (Cup Marked Stone)

The first major hike after the easing of the lockdown for us sheltered types in Scotland found me in Perthshire getting permission to park at Middleton Farm.

Walk through the farmyard and onto the Cateran Trail, at the first corner there is a gate which goes onto a long disused track. Follow this until the trees at the top of the hill are reached then head west. The stone is sheltered by a large tree.

The large slab has 12 cup marks, the biggest of which are 6cm wide by 1.5cm deep.

Visited 11/07/2020
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2020ce

Pitscurry (Cairn(s))

The Pitscurry Cairn is situated on top of the hill overlooking the Glenlogie and Pitscurry farms. The Pitscurry farm is now uninhabited.

I parked near the Damhead Quarry and walked north west on the track towards Glenlogie Farm, this follows the old railway line. Just before the farm I headed uphill following the dry stane dykes at the edge of the fields. Once over the dyke you make your way through trees and head high ferns until a clearing, of sorts, is reached. At least you can see north.

The cairn does remain in place. It is 6m wide and 0.5m high. There also appears to be a couple of kerbs on the east side. In amongst the ferns cairn material can be seen on top the site. Great views of Bennachie, in particular Mither Tap can be glimpsed between the trees to the south.

Great site for a cairn, winter time visit required.

Visited 4/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2020ce

South Balnoon (Cairn(s))

The Balnoon area near the Glendronach Distillery (a sacred place to us Turriff people) has had a lot of cairns removed due to agriculture and forestry. However one cairn does remain on the Drumblair Hill which neighbours the Hare Moss (home to the remnants of a stone circle).

Take the minor road marked South Balnoon on the B9024, this overlooks the distillery, and head south east until the first wood on the east. There is enough room to park a car on a down slope.

Follow the track uphill, this is quite steep, until a small gap in the trees, at the this point leave the track, head through the trees, jump a wee ditch and the cairn is in front.

As usual Mr Shepherd's descriptions are very short in Canmore. The cairn is just over 6m in width being 0.75m high. It is turf and heather covered but appears to have a bit of houk damage. Also there appears to be a ditch to the north and west sides. It also has a clear view over to the Raich Four Poster.

Not much to look at, at least the site hasn't vanished altogether.

Visited 27/06/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2020ce

Elliot Water (Promontory Fort)

After leaving the rain soaked Kirkbuddo Cairn we headed further east following the B9127 until the sharp corners at the Black Den bridge. The Black Burn flows under the bridge and it meets the Elliot Water nearby, both were bursting their banks.

For some reason I got completely lost by following a track which eventually vanished, however after finding a well built wall I found myself near a folly / temple overlooking Elliot Water. This made life easier, by sticking to ridge overlooking the burn and heading east I headed straight into the promontory fort.

An earthwork or rampart defends the west side of the fort stretching for about 52m being almost over 1m high in most most places. It is crescent shaped. Nature provides the rest of the other defences with steep slopes going down to the two burns.

Sticking to high places overlooking the Black Burn and following a type of track we made our way back north towards were I had parked the car. If anybody finds car keys here, they belong to me.

Visited 14/02/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2020ce

Barclye Cairn (Cairn(s))

Visited 11.07.20

Barclye Cairn is described in Canmore ID 62933 (go to Links). It is a robbed out cairn 20m across by 1.5m high. There are two earthfast stones which may be the remnants of a cist.

Directions: Take the A75 turn off to Newton Stewart at the large roundabout. Follow the town centre to the end of Victoria Street & bear left across the Cree Bridge. Turn L about 50 yards from the end of the bridge into Minnigaff. After 0.5 mile you will see a war memorial on your R.
Take the next L turn after 100 yards. This is a narrow country lane headed to Cree Woods. Follow this lane past Minigaff Parish Church, Boreland Wood and Boreland Farm. Around 0.75 mile after Boreland Farm there is a gate at NX 389 686 (approximately) on the R. There is limited parking here so I chose to go onto Barclye Wood Parking (NX 38604 69482) around 0.5 miles along the lane.
Having walked back to the gateway, I headed N up a slope for 300 yards to a hilltop where Barclye Cairn is prominent.
Drumwhirn Cairn & Barclye Cairn are close together so they can easily be achieved in the same trip.
Posted by markj99
12th July 2020ce

Drumwhirn Cairn (Cairn(s))

Visited 11.07.20

Directions: Take the A75 turn off to Newton Stewart at the large roundabout. Follow the town centre to the end of Victoria Street & bear left across the Cree Bridge. Turn L about 50 yards from the end of the bridge into Minnigaff. After 0.5 mile you will see a war memorial on your R.
Take the next L turn after 100 yards. This is a narrow country lane headed to Cree Woods. Follow this lane past Minigaff Parish Church, Boreland Wood and Boreland Farm. Around 0.5 mile after Boreland Farm a green lane protected by a deer gate starts at NX 39089 68355 on the R. There is limited parking here so I chose to go onto Barclye Wood Parking (NX 38604 69482) around 0.5 miles along the lane.

Having walked back to the green lane I found the gate immovable so I had to climb the high style beside the gate. Follow the green lane uphill for 300 yards, bearing R at a fork then reach another deer gate 150 yards later. I opened this gate with some difficulty (it was heavy and stiff) and followed the field perimeter NE for around 150 yards to another deer gate. Look L to see Drumwhirn Cairn, a significant pile of stones in the adjacent field around 300 yards away. After another deer gate workout there is a stream to cross on stepping stones before reaching the field. Drumwhirn Cairn is impressive on approach however closer inspection shows significant stone robbing. The summit has been excavated leaving a dirt filled hollow behind.

Drumwhirn Cairn is on a highpoint with extensive views all round. It is around 30 metres across and 5 metres high. It must have been spectacular before Man started messing with it.

Further details of Drumwhirn Cairn can be found at Canmore ID 62929 (go to Links).

Drumwhirn Cairn & Barclye Cairn are close together so they can easily be achieved in the same trip.
Posted by markj99
12th July 2020ce

Rush (Chambered Tomb)

There are some sites that hold an enduring fascination, even though, because of their ruinous condition, they are well past their sell by dates. It could be their location, or the tantalising tales of what once was, or it could be a je ne sais quois, a more regular feeling about a lot of these places. It could also be the grim determination that one feels, that no matter what remains and no matter how insubstantial it is, we will bear witness, gripped as we are by endless curiosity, nagging impulse and barmy nerdishness. It could be any, or all, like Rush today, of these.

Drive or walk north out of Rush village (now an ever-expanding town) on the Skerries road and the first turn on the right is Six Cross Lane. This leads down to the north beach of Rush with its caravan parks and holiday homes. Take this, the more adventurous route, to access the site (There is a track 150 metres further north that leads to an easier route, but it was waterlogged and muddy today and was only suitable for wellies, not my cheap Lidl walking boots).

From the north beach, walk north towards the promontory where the remains lie, rounding a small headland and fording the stream that flows through the deep gully. You can ascend, with mild difficulty, the path where the stream meets the beach. Follow the track past the cabbage fields, east onto the promontory and skirting the cliff-edge and there you have it.

It’s true that keeping one’s expectations low seldom leads to disappointment, and from reading the various sources, I wasn’t expecting much. There are more remains here than I have read about in any of the mentions I’ve found, but when one reads that this was a conical mound, thirty metres in diameter with a ten metre long passage and a 2.4 metre long chamber, one realises that these remains are scant indeed. But today is really about location and sensation and determination and relief.

Three contiguous stones still stand in the undergrowth and cairn rubble that separates the penultimate field of the small promontory from the field beyond. They look like kerbstones. It’s not much to hold on to, they’re not mentioned anywhere else, but there they are. Just over the rubble in the corner of the last field, beside the track, lies a large, loose boulder, said definitively to be from the the tomb. Were this all that remains, other than the written words of what once was, disappointment may have sunk in, but no – what is here ought to be examined and preserved, but probably won’t.

I’d been up the road in Skerries earlier and had gotten lashed on. The two sites I’d visited there deserved more attention than I’d managed, but here the sun had emerged. I’d almost given up when I’d seen the waterlogged, muddy track, had returned to the car and started to head for home. Then the pull kicked in. Fuck it. I turned the car around and sought another route, not fully believing there was a way, but there was a will.

Herity says that the mound “had been more than half-destroyed when W.P. Newenham saw the site in 1838.” I’ve driven past the location many a time and wondered was the whole thing just wiped away, pulled apart and ploughed into the ground. Well not all of it. There are traces still, tantalising, like the sensation one has looking across to distant, private Lambay, just out of reach but still possible. The colours of the day were emerging from the greyness that has dominated this last four or five weeks of this unique pandemicked summer. Sun was breaking through as the rain fled across the Irish sea and I didn’t want to leave but had to.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
12th July 2020ce

Langholz (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

At the eastern edge of the forest, about 500m north of Langholz, the Dolmen of Langholz is situated, a megalithic chamber running in a north-south direction. The site, which is part of the Megalithic Routes of Schleswig-Holstein, is in good condition since it was restored in 1977.

It is an extended dolmen, the approximately 2 m × 1 m large rectangular chamber is made of five supporting stones, in the south there is a low entrance stone. It is covered with a capstone, its dimensions are approximately 1.8 m × 1.5 m.

The site was originally covered by a heaped up mound. In the "Atlas of Germany's Megalithic Tombs" by Ernst Sprockhoff, the dolmen is still described as almost completely destroyed.

To visit the site, drive through Langholz on the road Ostseestraße. At the street fork, stay on the Ostseestraße (left) and after about 300 m you'll reach a small car park on the left. Park you car here and walk along the road for another 130m until you come to a small crossing. Turn left here into the road Seeblick. Walk along the road in a northwest direction, after 100m the road turns into a field track. Follow this track for additional 400m until you reach the forest. The tomb is signposted here and is situated in the wood on the left 70m from the track.

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
8th July 2020ce

taken from the on-site Megalithic Routes in Schleswig-Holstein information board:

Megalith chamber of Langholz

This free-standing megalith chamber, restored in 1977, was part of an covered megalithic tomb. The construction is known as an extended dolmen, an early form of a large stone grave. The term describes a burial mound with a burial chamber made of at least three supporting stones, which hold at least one stone on top.

Weighty business
Without doubt, the stones in front of us are mighty. So the question is, how did they get into this position? The site is so complex that it required a certain amount of planning. In preparation for transporting the stones, logs were collected and processed so that they could be pulled on them. The production of enough ropes as a pulling aid also probably took a few weeks in advance. The tons of stones could only be moved with enough human or animal traction, the leverage of additional wooden poles and the rolling woods underneath. If the supporting stones were aligned with a lot of strength in the pits prepared for them, the even heavier capstones were placed on them using earth ramps. How long all of this may have been can only be guessed. In any case, a huge amount of work can be expected.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
8th July 2020ce

Lehmberg (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

When I visited Lehmberg in June 2020, the crop was already very high and was also soaking wet from the rain last night. Since there was no access path and I didn't want to trample down the crop, I just took a zomm shot of the tomb from the field edge.

As there are many tombs in the middle of fields in this area, a visit in winter / spring makes more sense. I am therefore planning my next visit rather in these seasons and will surely stop by again here.

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Not visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th July 2020ce

Karlsminde (Long Barrow)

This site is a well-preserved, west-east orientated long barrow (in German Hünenbett oder Langbett). There are three dolmens on the southern long side.

Under the supervision of the State Office for Prehistory and Early History, it was examined and restored between 1976 and 1978 by the working group Arbeitsgemeinschaft Vor- und Frühbeschichte of the Heimatgemeinschaft Eckernförde e.V.. Much of the 108 enclosure stones of the rectangular long barrow were preserved. The foundations of missing stones had to be localized by their foundations. Some stood in situ on the south side. Most of the curbs, however, were tilted outwards and were covered by the spreading hills. After the restoration, the dimensions of the site were 60 x 5.5 m, with a height of up to 2.5 m.

The 3 dolmens lying across the long barrow are all on the southern long side. The middle dolmen was only discovered during the restoration work. It was found that the dolmen was originally in a round hill, which was later integrated into the long barrow.

From Eckernförde you drive the Waabser Chaussee road towards Waabs. After about 5 kilometers, turn right towards Karlsminde.
The site with its own parking lot is located after 500 m directly to the left of the street.

Highly recommended, if you are in the area!

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th July 2020ce

taken from the on-site Megalithic Routes in Schleswig-Holstein information board:

The restored long barrow of Karlsminde

This burial site was restored in 1976-1978 by the working group Arbeitsgemeinschaft Vor- und Frühbeschichte of the Heimatgemeinschaft Eckernförde e.V. with a lot of voluntary support. Cooperation with archaeologists and conservationists made it possible to carry out an exemplary project to preserve a megalithic tomb. The goal of the restoration was the exemplary reconstruction of a possible condition of long barrow in the Neolithic period.

Landscape shaping
Schleswig-Holstein: the flat north of Germany? Not everywhere! The ice ages shaped Schleswig-Holstein's surface. As flat as the marshland in the west is, the hills in the east are wavy. However, some minor elevations were not caused by the ice ages. They do not easily fit into the natural environment. But once the search is known, it is recognizable everywhere in the landscape: they are megalithic tombs. In many places they are also clustered in groups. Some are elongated, others are circular. Their stand positions in well-exposed places like here are also outstanding. This place was also unmistakable in the Neolithic period. So graves became markings of areas of influence of the burying group. As obvious landmarks, the megaliths were later used as landmarks. For example, Bronze Age trails, such as the Ox Trail, and burial sites are often close to the megalithic tombs of the Neolithic.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th July 2020ce

Kirkbuddo Cairn (Cairn(s))

The Kirkbuddo or Gallows Hill Cairn is a very easy site to find sitting on an easily spotted mound next to the B9127 near Kirkbuddo House. I asked permission to park and visited the site in the pouring rain. Thankfully it's a short walk.

This must have been a huge monument, it still stands at 25m wide being almost 4m high. However it has been severely damaged. Obviously at some point a few people have had their lives ended here also.

Water tanks and related buildings have been built into the site, ironically the remains of the cairn look much better than the efforts built in 1905.

Still, a worthwhile visit.

Visited 14/02/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
29th June 2020ce

Strone Hill East (Cairn(s))

Once finished with the multiple sites at the west side of Strone Hill it's time head over the top of the hill to the site on the east. This a gentle climb amongst grass and heather, nothing serious. The walk is only halted by a fence next to the field which houses the cairn.

Sadly this well sized cairn has had a fair amount of field clearance dumped on top of it as well as a bit of houking. However several kerbs remain place around the edge of the 14m wide site, standing at just below 1m.

By this time it was getting dark, Brankam and Welton Hills will have to wait for another day.

A fine end to a fine day.

Visited 4/01/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
29th June 2020ce

Strone Hill (Stone Circle)

Certainly one of the smallest stone circles I've seen but also one of the best for being surrounded in prehistoric sites. In this case you practically trip over them.

From Mid Strone head North west into the centre of the plateau. One stone barely stands, the other three appear to have fallen.

Visited 4/01/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
29th June 2020ce

Goosefeld

The megalithic tombs at Goosefeld are four graves of the Neolithic Funnel Beaker Culture near Goosefeld in the district Rendsburg-Eckernförde in Schleswig-Holstein. They have the Sprockhoff numbers 75–78.

The tombs do not form a coherent group. Goosefeld 1 lies west of Goosefeld in a meadow. Goosefeld 2 lies east of the village and 980 m east-southeast of Goosefeld 1 in a field. Goosefeld 3 lies 1 km south-southwest of Goosefeld 2 and west of Lehmsiek. Goosefeld 4 is 760 m southeast of Goosefeld 2 and north of Lehmsiek.

Groß Wittensee is located 770 m south-west of Goosefeld 3.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th June 2020ce

Goosefeld 4 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Wow, this must be one of the most beautiful dolmens in northern Germany. Shortly after Lehmsiek towards Eckernförde this prototype of a dolmen is on the right hand side on a hill overlooking all of the surrounding scenery. You can't place a dolmen nicer, the view in every direction is fantastic.

The tomb has an east-west-facing burial chamber, which is the rest of an extended or a large dolmen. There are still two support stones on the north and one on the south long side. A capstone 2.5 m long, 2.2 m wide and 1.1 m thick rests on them.

Goosefeld 4 lies in a field just beside the road from Lehmsiek to Eckernförde, when you come from Eckernförde it is on the left side just before you reach Lehmsiek. Parking is a bit tricky and be aware that the electric fence might be in operation, at least it was during my visit.

This is a must see site in the area around Eckernförde, highly recommended!

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
27th June 2020ce
Edited 28th June 2020ce

Goosefeld 3 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

South of Goosefeld about 100 m from the road Profiter Weg between two fields lies Goosefeld 3, a long barrow with once 3 tombs, only one of which is still visible at the northwestern end.

The northwest-southeast orientated long barrow is about 41m long and 7m wide. On the long sides, several stones of the enclosure are still preserved. The dolmen or stone cist in the north west of the long barrow seems to be partly destroyed lately, as in older photos there is still a capstone visible.

Although the site is part of the Megalithic Routes in Schleswig-Holstein, I found it to be rather "neglected" or not very well "maintained". The site was quite overgrown, so I would recommend a visit in winter or spring to see the structures much better. There are also signs that point to the site, but no longer in the immediate vicinity of the tomb, so that it is not so easy to find.

To find the site drive on the road Eckernförder Straße from Haby northwards to Eckernförde. Just behind Lehmsiek and just before Goosefeld 4 comes into view, turn left into the road Hexenberg. When you come to a T-crossing, turn left into the road Profiter Weg and park on the right after about 100m, where a field track starts in a western direction. Follow this track along the edge of a field for another 100m and you'll find the site on the right.

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
27th June 2020ce

taken from the on-site Megalithic Routes in Schleswig-Holstein information board:

A long barrow in Goosefeld

This impressive long barrow was restored in 1980, but the stone enclosure has not been completely preserved. The removed stones were often used as building material for building houses and roads. Some stones still show the signs of dismantling. In the 19th century in particular, many megalithic tombs were massively destroyed.

Archaeocosmetic treatment
This site is one of the earliest man-made monuments that have been preserved for thousands of years. They are the first architectural masterpieces and the oldest visible monuments above ground in Schleswig-Holstein. But not every stone stands exactly as it did in the Stone Age. Besides to the natural decay and violent interventions, many modern people had their own ideas about the appearance of the old graves and "improved" them. At the end of the 20th century, the worker at the time jokingly mentioned the carrying out of an "archaeocosmentic treatment" in the area around Goosefeld in the monument files belonging to this grave. What is meant is an intervention that is not absolutely necessary from a scientific and monument preservation point of view in order to superficially bring the system closer to its originally assumed state. In many places, it is not clear whether the interventions are based on scientific studies of the tomb to be restored. So some enclosure stone circles were created only for visual reasons and are therefore purely fictitious. This tomb is under a preservation order since 1967 which does not allow changes.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
27th June 2020ce

Goosefeld 1 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Goosefeld 1 is located west of Goosefeld at the farm Katzheide close to the B203 between Groß Wittensee and Eckernförde. It is one of a total of 15 stations of the Megalithic Routes in Schleswig-Holstein.

Remains of an almost east-west-oriented burial chamber are still preserved from this site. Eight stones are still available, but do not allow any conclusions to be drawn about type of the chamber.

P.S.: The image stabilizer on my camera didn't work properly on this tour, so some of my images are unfortunately out of focus. Sorry for that.

Visited June 2020
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
27th June 2020ce

taken from the on-site information board:

COMMUNITY GOOSEFELD
- Passage Grave -

Megalithic tomb of the rural Funnel Beaker Culture (around 2500 BC) in a mound of earth delimited by a stone circle that is not preserved today. Seven support stones and the entrance stone are still visible from the passage grave, the capstone and the support stones in the northeast are missing.
Internal dimensions: length about 5.75m, width 1.50m.
On the partially disturbed pavement of the burial chamber were still grave goods from the Funnel Beaker Culture: amber (5) and an arrowhead (6). In a subsequent burial of the individual grave culture around 1800 BC there were two battle axes (1 and 2) and two cross axes or adze (3 and 4).
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
27th June 2020ce

Strone Hill Ring Cairns

Once at the Mid Strone Cairn look north and west and you'll see plenty of prehistoric sites. These are the ring cairns.

NO29181 56740
A very small ring cairn, perhaps a double kerb. One of the outer kerbs has fallen.

NO29172 56753 One larger outer kerb and an inner circle of small stones.

NO28995 56752 A small ring cairn 5m wide.

NO28976 56776 A nice ring cairn sitting at over 6m wide, some decent kerbs amongst the turf.

Visited 4/01/2020
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
23rd June 2020ce
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