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South Ayrshire: Latest Posts

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Ailsa Craig (Natural Rock Feature) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Ailsa Craig</b>Posted by markj99<b>Ailsa Craig</b>Posted by markj99<b>Ailsa Craig</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
24th April 2019ce

Ailsa Craig (Natural Rock Feature) — Fieldnotes

Visited 17.07.13

It was third time lucky on the MV Glorious out of Girvan. We were turned back by the waves on two previous trips but persistence rewarded me with around two hours on the rock.
The rock has a lighthouse, two foghorns, a ruined tower house and industrial remains on the shore. It is famous for Ailsite granite curling stones which are prized for their durability. Some unshaped stones can be found on the beach.
There is more vegetation than is apparent from a distance and the grassy summit is 338 metres above sea level.
Posted by markj99
24th April 2019ce

Garleffin (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Garleffin</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
6th April 2019ce

Ailsa Craig (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Ailsa Craig</b>Posted by spencer spencer Posted by spencer
6th October 2018ce

Lyonston (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

Drive by - 28.7.15

Directions:
A short distance north east of Maybole, along a minor road.


For a change (not) it was raining. It has rained so much this holiday I am now on my second pair of boots. I have had enough of rain for a while. I have had enough of being wet, walking in the rain etc.
A drive by it is then!


The boulder-type stone is easily seen from the A77.
It is on the high point in the field.

Canmore state:
A rounded granite boulder about 1.4m in height. According to historian Mr J Gray its local name is Lyonston - from which the naerby farm took its name.
Posted by CARL
28th July 2015ce

The Witching Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Miscellaneous

Drive by - 28.7.15

The stone is easy to see alongside the A77 but parking anywhere near is impossible. The stone stands in the middle of a recently ploughed field. It is approximately 1m high x 0.5m wide at the base. It has a pointy top.
The stone must be a considerable pain for the person who has to plough the field :)
Posted by CARL
28th July 2015ce

Garleffin (Standing Stones) — Fieldnotes

Visited 28.7.15

Directions:
South of the A77 along a minor road at Garleffin - a short distance south of the village of Ballantrae.


The stones are easy to spot in the garden of the end bungalow. One stone is in the front lawn, the larger stone is along the side of the house. The stones are approximately 1.5m high and 0.5m wide. The tops of the grey stones are covered in moss. The stones are very easy to see from the road outside the house.
Posted by CARL
28th July 2015ce

Craigs of Kyle (Rocking Stone) — Folklore

The Canmore site record calls this 'The Witch's Stone'.
On the top of the Craigs of Kyle there was, in former times, a chapel dedicated to Saint Bride. The only vestige of it now remaining is the well, which is still called Saint Bride's Well. No notice is taken of this ancient place of worship in Chalmer's Caledonia, or the Statistical Account of Scotland: but it is worthy of remark, from the existence of another remain of antiquity which has hitherto escaped the observation of topographical or antiquarian writers. This is a Rocking-Stone -- adding another to the many proofs, that the early propogators of Christianity invariably planted the Cross where the inhabitants had been in the habit of assembling under the Druidical form of worship.

The Rocking-Stone occupies the summit of the highest of the Craigs. It is an exceedingly large elongated block of granite, but must have been at one time much larger, as several pieces seem to have fallen from it through the action of the weather, being much exposed to the moisture and storms of the west.

We regret our inability to take an accurate measurement of the stone at the time of our visit, not having been aware of the existence of such a relic. Tradition is silen in reference to it, though it is pointed out as a curiosity by the people in the vicinity. There can be no doubt, however, of its Druidical character. Although it has now lost its vibrating power, being propped up by stones, the pivot is easily discernible.
From The Scottish Journal, 1848.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th May 2013ce
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