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Creag Nan Uamh (Cave / Rock Shelter)

https://bellacaledonia.org.uk/2018/11/03/creag-nan-uamh/

From Bella Caledonia, the thoughts of the brilliant Dougie Strang
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th December 2020ce

Dundarg (Cliff Fort)

There can be little doubt that this fort was the "cathair" of Abbordobor which the Mormaer Bede the Pict made over to St Drostan, on his arrival at Aberdour in the 6th century AD.

Book of Deer
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th December 2020ce

Knowe of Lairo (Chambered Cairn)

From "Wisdom of the Ancients" by Neil Oliver

Rousay locals have mostly never been inside the tombs. They say when you grow up surrounded by them, the tombs are of no more interest that the ruined, abandoned cottages that also dot the fields. I think this is just what they say to strangers. I think it is more likely those folk were raised to respect the tombs, maybe to fear ghosts so kept their distance. As recently as 1911 an Orkney farmer reported how he had been digging into a burial mound on his farm when there appeared beside at his side an old man, grey-bearded, in tattered clothes. He had a warning for the farmer:

“Thou are working thy own ruin, believe me, fellow, for if thou does any more work, thou will regret it when it is too late. Take my word, fellow, stop working in my house, for if thou doesn’t, mark my work fellow, if thou takes another shuleful, mark my word, thy will have six of thy cattle dying in thy corn-yard at one time. And if thou goes on doing any more work, fellow – mark my word, fellow, thou will have six funerals from the house; does thy mark my word: good-day fellow."

According to the tale, the deaths of six cattle duly follow and the funerals of six members of the household.
tjj Posted by tjj
2nd December 2020ce

Heaven Stone (Holed Stone)

I don’t own a copy of Ecclesiological notes on some of the islands of Scotland (1885) by TS Muir. I would hazard a guess that not many people do. However, the book is used as a reference in Canmore ID 10939 (go to Links) for Trumpan Church in Skye.
Therefore I would like to acknowledge Malcolm H Jones for a quote from pages 270-1 posted on MyCanmore Text in Canmore ID 10939. Canmore does not mention the Heaven Stone in its account however Muir has an account of the stone and its tradition.
Muir describes it as "a rude undressed pillar called 'The Trying Stone,' to which, according to local tradition, accused persons were taken, and there, through a venturesome appeal to the object, made manifest their innocence or their guilt. It is a massy whin, 4 ft. 8 in. in height, with a downwardly-bent cavity of an inch and a half in diameter near to its top. As the story goes, the appellant was placed within a certain distance of the stone, and then, approaching it blindfold, established his innocence only by unerringly putting his finger into the cavity."
Posted by markj99
28th October 2020ce

Giant's Grave (Sma' Glen) (Standing Stone / Menhir)

'Near to the entrance to the Glen were the grassy embankments of a Roman Camp, but a feature of the valley that interested me more than this relic of the dim past was a great boulder about a mile beyond. It stood a little aside from the highway, and a much used path leading to it was evidence that it had many visitors. What the attraction was, I could not have conjectured, had I not heard its story previously. It had a smooth, rounding top, and rose above the ground to a height of seven or eight feet. At its base lay three heavy stones, the largest about the size of a peck measure.
It was a common custom among travellers who happened into Glen Urtach to try 'Saddling the Mare' that is, to attempt putting the stones up on the boulder. They slid off with surprising ease, and few persons had the strength or cleverness to lodge all three. Still it was allowable to boast, even if you only succeeded with the two smaller ones. That the sport was a popular one was attested by the battered whiteness of the top of the boulder.' The Land of Heather. Clifton Johnson (1903).

The above quote attests to the tradition of Saddlin the mare when passing through the Sma' Glen. There were three stones of increasing weight to place on the top slope of the stone without it falling off. The route through the sma' glen was a drovers road so the tradition may derive from ancient times.
There is a moderately sized stone at the base of the rock so it may be one of the original 'saddles'. It is interesting that a stone is 'saddled' on top of the rock in Andy's pictures so the tradition appears to be continuing.
Posted by markj99
24th October 2020ce

The Muckle Stane (Monkton) (Natural Rock Feature)

At the Cross is The Hare Stane, moved here from its original site in a field off Charles Avenue. The boulder had a long tradition of witchcraft and evil spirits associated with it, but in 2000 it was moved to its present position and a sealed "Millennium Box" placed beneath it.

The above quote is taken from P.232 Ayshire: Discovering A County by Dane Love (2003).
Posted by markj99
21st September 2020ce

Dun an Sticir (Broch)

Dun an Sticir, North Uist
In about 1600, Hugh Macdonald sought refuge on this fortified island after a plot to overthrow his cousin as chief of the MacDonalds of Sleat was exposed. He held out for a year, living in a stronghold that was built on a 2,000-year-old broch on a tidal loch. The only way to get at him was along two stone causeways that are exposed at low tide. The name Dun an Sticir - fort of the skulker - probably comes from this episode.



There is no happy ending. Macdonald was betrayed and captured. He was taken to Skye and thrown into the dungeon under Duntulm Castle where a grisly end awaited him. Given only salt beef to eat but no water - his captor kindly provided him with an empty jug - Macdonald died of thirst.

Steve Farrar
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Dun an Sticir

An Iron Age broch situated approximately 9.5 kilometers north of Lochmaddy in a lake on North Uist in the Scottish Outer Hebrides. A building was erected on the site in the late medieval period. Hugh MacDonald of Sleat inhabited Dun Sticir in 1602. In 1586 he hatched a plan to murder his cousin, Donald Gorm, 8th Chief of the Macdonalds of Sleat. After his plan was discovered, he fled to Dun an Sticir

De Tha Tol
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Turin Hill (Hillfort)

Conall Corc and the Pictish Dreamtime

The circular homesteads on Turin have similarities with others in Perthshire and one authority has likened these to Irish structures and linked to an incursion of Gaelic speakers into the region between 500 and 800 AD. There is, remarkably, an ancient Irish tale which may be linked to the site which would suggest this is true and push back the Irish link to the earlier part of this date range, if not before it. I have fancifully called this the Pictish Dreamtime, though this is an unforgivably romantic description of the period just beyond the Pictish historical horizon. I summarised the tale of the possibly 4th century Corc in an earlier post (which can be fully read here ). His story is contained in the Irish legend of 'The Finding of Cashel'.

Conall Corc, from the Eoganáchta people, was the son of King Luigthech and Bolce Ben-bretnach (“the British woman”), which suggests there may have been even earlier contact between Munster and North Britain. Conall was later adopted by another ruler, his cousin Crimthann, but when he rejected the advances of Crimthann's wife he was sent in exile to the Picts in Britain. In this foreign land, Conall almost perished in a blizzard, but he was saved by the bard of the local Pictish king. The bard also noticed a magical message written on Conall’s shield at the behest of his father. The message directed the king of Pictland to kill Corc. But the poet changed the words to request the king to give Corc every assistance he could and even give his daughter to the Irish immigrant, which is exactly what happened. Prince Corcc remained in Pictland until he had seven sons and an immense fortune. One of his sons founded the Eoganacht kin-group of Circinn, and was possibly the ancestor of the Pictish king Angus mac Fergus.

Several sources name Mongfinn’s son Cairbre, while the Book of the Hui Maine says the son was Main, but there were three other sons attributed to Corc and Mongfinn, all born in Alba. The full name of Feradach’s daughter was apparently Leamhain Mongfionn, and she had by Corc, Cairbre Cruithenechán of Circinn and Maine Leamhna. The latter was ancestor of the Mormaers of Lennox, around Loch Lomond.


What has this to do with Turin? Corc ended up apparently at the fortress of a Pictish leader named Feradach. The stronghold was named Turin brighe na Righe. The name may be coincidental, but it is still impressive. Corc married Mongfinn, daughter of the Pictish king, stayed ten years sojourn in Alba, and had three sons. In three manuscript versions of the descendents of Eber in the Psalter of Cashel, one of these says that Cairbre Cruithinechan (“Pict Sprung”) was ancestor of the Eoganacht of Magh Circinn.



Whether or not the tales hold water, they are nevertheless intriguing, and ultimately perhaps unprovable. I have provided Vernam Hull's full translation of one version of the tale of Corc below for anyone interested. The first part of the tale is mission, but the story is interesting all the same.

The Exile of Conall Corc

...Dublin and saw the ships going over the sea. He went with them eastwards over the sea and perceived the mountains of Scotland. They let him go onto the land. He went to a mountain in the west of Scotland. Much snow descended on him so that it reached his girdle. For five days he was without drink and without food until he cast himself down in a dying condition in a glen.
Gruibne the scholar, the poet of Feradach, king of Scotland, came, twelve horsemen strong, into the glen to seek his pigs. He beheld a lap of his mantle above the snow.

"A dead man!" he said. He saw that his body was [still] warm. "Frost has done that to the man," said the poet. "Kindle a fire around him in order that his limbs will be able to rise."

That was done so that he steamed. Suddenly he arose.

"Steady, O warrior," Gruibne said. "Do not fear anything."

Then, on beholding his countenance, Gruibne spoke as follows:"Welcome, O fair Conall Corc who took each land in the west beyond the region of the sea. Here, the ocean confused you so that sleep stretches you out. A host with silent troops of valor uttered a heavy cry for nine hours so that you were unable to find a word. Good [is] the meeting to which I am destined, [namely], that you came upon me [and] that you did not abide upon the surface of another land. [It was] a plan of sin that sword-ends were brought for your betrayal over the flatness of your body. ..of Lugaid mac Ailella. With honor he was honored. . . O mighty Corc about whom firebrands raise a cry,for fair Cashel protects you so that it will be over Femen that you will rule with fine feasting. Well will you suppress bad weather. In Munster-of the-great-hosts you will receive hostages so that you will be the lion of Loch Lein. Your fame will fill Ireland's vast plain and the race of Oengus above the surface of each land. The adze-heads will come over the sea's ocean with hooks of crooked staves." Actually the poet who had recited the poetic composition was one of the two captives whom Corc had protected from the Leinstermen. Then he put both his arms around him."It were indeed fitting for us," he said, "to welcome you. Who," said he, "saw to your advantage by means of the Ogham writing which is on your shield?" It was not good fortune that it indicated."

"What is on it?" said Corc.

"This is on it: If it be during the day that you might go to Feradach, your head is to be removed before it were evening. If it be in the night, your head is to be removed before it were morning. Not thus will it be."

Afterwards, he bore him with him to his own house, and a hurdle [was] under him, and eight men [were] under the hurdle. On that day a month later, he went forthwith to speak with Feradach, and he left Corc outside. He related to him his whole story, namely, how he went to seek his pigs, and he said that he had intended to kill the man. When he saw the Ogham writing on the shield, he was loath to slay him, for this was on it: "A son of the king of Munster has come to you. If it be during the day that he might come, your daughter is to be given to him before evening. If it be in the night, she is to sleep with him before morning."

"The news is bad," said Feradach. "Anyone would indeed be sad that you have brought him alive."

"Gruibne bound his equal weight in silver on Feradach and brought him in. That one offered him a great welcome. But the daughter was not given to him, for Feradach said that he would not grant his daughter to a hireling soldier . . . from abroad. This availed him hot, because the couple had intercourse with each other so that the woman became pregnant by him, and she was brought
down, and bore him a son. She did not admit that it was Corc's. They intended to burn her [and] the men of Scotland came for the burning. It was formerly a custom that any maiden who committed fornication without bethrothal was burnt. Hence, these hills are [named] Mag Breoa, that is Mag Breg. Then the men of Scotland besought a respite for the girl to the end of a year until her son
had assumed the form, voice or habit of the sept.

At the end of a year they came to burn her. "I will not bring your son to you," said she.

"You shall, however, bring him," said he, "into the presence of Feradach."

When, then, she was about to be burned, she brought him before both of them.

"O woman," said Feradach, "does the boy belong to Corc?"

"He does," said the woman.

"I will not take him from you," said Corc, "for he is a bastard until his grandfather gives him."

"I do indeed give him to you," said Feradach. "The son is yours."

"Now he will be accepted," said Corc.

"Go forth, O woman," said Feradach, "and you shall have no luck."

"She shall, however, not go," said Corc, "since she is not guilty."

"She is, nevertheless, guilty," said Feradach.

"But she is not guilty," said Corc. "To each son [belongs] his mother. On her son falls her misdeed, that is, on her womb."

"Let the son, therefore, be expelled," said Feradach.

"He shall indeed not be expelled," said Corc, "since that youth has not attained manhood. For the son will pay for her offence."

"You have saved them both," said Feradach.

"That will be fortunate," said Corc.

"Well, O Corc,"said Feradach, "sleep with your wife. It is you whom we would have chosen for her, if we had had a choice."' I will pay her price to the men of Scotland."

That was done. He remained in the east until she had born him three sons.

"Well, O Corc," said Feradach, "take your sons and your wife with you to your country, for it is sad that they should be outside of their land. Take the load of three men of silver with you. Let thirty warriors accompany you."

That was done. He came from the east, thirty warriors strong, until he reached Mag Femin. There, snow descended upon them so that it led them astray at Cnocc Graffand. His father was infirm.That brought them northwards into the north of Mag [Femin].

On that day, the swineherd of Aed, the king of Muscraige, was tending his pigs. That night, he said to Aed: "I saw a wonder today," said he, "on these ridges in the north. I beheld a yew-bush on a stone, and I perceived a small oratory in front of it and a flagstone before it. Angels were in attendance going up and down from the flagstone."

"Verily," said the druid of Aed," that will be the residence of the king of Munster forever, and he who shall first kindle a fire under that yew, from him shall descend the kingship of Munster."

"Let us go to light it," said Aed.

"Let us wait until morning," said the druid.

[Thither] then came the aforesaid Corc in his wanderings.He kindled a fire for his wife and for his sons so that Aed found him on the following day by his fire with his sons about him. He recognized him then, and he gave him a great welcome, and he put his son in surety under his custody. When,
now, after the death of his father there was contention about the kingship of Munster, then Corc came. Thereupon, a residence was at once established by him in Cashel and before the end of a week, he was the undisputed king of the Munstermen.

The surety of the Muscraige is the first surety that a king of Munster ever took, and, afterwards, they were freed, and a queen of theirs [was]in Cashel. Moreover, the swineherd who was found in Cashel, freedom was given to him and to his children by the king of Cashel, that is, without tribute and without exaction of king or steward. It is he, too, who raises the cry of kingship for the king of Cashel, and is given a blessing by the king, and straightway receives the garment of the king. Hence it is, then, that Corc's Cashel exists, and it is the progeny and the seed of Corc mac Lugthach that abides forever in Cashel from that time forth.

Angus Folklore
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce

Clogh Leabhrais (Natural Rock Feature)

An enormous glacial errartic “around which a lie must not be told for fear of the rock splitting in two.” ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th August 2020ce

Drumanone (Portal Tomb)

My grandfather James Carroll who lives in Spa Boyle told me the following story about the Druids altar. There is a Druids altar in Tinnecara to the north side of the railway in Thomas Ballintinels land. The altar is made of three large stones two uprights and one over head. Each stone weighs about ten tons weight. The druids used to come home from Knockadoo and swim across Lough Gara to worship their god at this altar.
Recorded as part of the Schools Collection in the 1930s, and online now at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
14th August 2020ce

Brewell's Hill (Stone Circle)

There is another stone circle on "Brewel Hill" known as "The Piper's Stones.
The tradition about these stones is A lot of maidens were tempted to dance on an holy day, while a piper played for them. Like a flash of lightening they were all changed into stones.
Collected as part of the Schools Collection in the 1930s, and now online at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th August 2020ce

Crehelp (Standing Stone / Menhir)

There is a standing stone in Cryhelp about three miles west of Dunlavin. It has a hole in the top of it about nine inches long and four inches wide. There is an old tradition about it, that it was not aways in that place, it was moved to mark the grave of Harold, chief prince who was killed in the battle of Glen Mama.
The corner of the field in which the Cryhelp stone is standing is said to have been a cemetery a long time ago, covered with trees. Near at hand is a nettle-covered hollow, which was at one time opened; there is an underground passage leading to a mound not far away. It is not said that this hole was used to cure anything.
Recorded as part of the Schools Collection in the 1930s, and now online at Duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th August 2020ce

The Split Rock, Killeenduff (Natural Rock Feature)

This rock is probably over 300 tons in weight and is in a field beside Killenduff National School. It is split in two as if it were hewn by a saw. This is the tradition connected with it:-
Ages ago two fierce giants lived on the Ox Mountains. They argued about their respective strengths and what they could do. They agreed to put the argument to a test by throwning a stone. They selected two large stones of similar size, several tons in weight. The idea was to see who could throw the stone from the Ox Mountains to the sea, five miles distant.
The first took up the stone, flung it, and it fell into the sea. The second took his throw and it fell about half a mile from the sea in its present position. The second giant's rage was so great seeing that he had failed in his attempt that he seized his sword, ran towards the rock and with one fierce cut, split it in two.
Collected from Peg Judge in Croagh, and recorded in the Schools Collection of the 1930s (view at Duchas.ie.

Also in the Collection:
The tradition says that any body who walks through the Rock three times shall surely meet their doom. I have never heard of any body to go through it three times.
The DromoreWest website suggests your doom might come a bit quickly, as the rock will slam shut on you.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th August 2020ce

Tober Grania (Wedge Tomb)

The floor of the chamber is covered with a deposit of mud. The tomb is locally considered to be a holy well and offerings of coins, some quite recent, medals, broken glass, etc., lie on the lower roofstone. The interior of the chamber is littered with broken glass.
From p128 in 'Survey of the Megalithic Tombs of Ireland, vol 1 - County Clare' by Ruaidhri de Valera and Sean O Nuallain (1961).

In an article called 'A Folklore Survey of County Clare' in Folklore v22, 1911, it says, "The mud of the dolmen or "well" of Tobergrania at Ballycroum cured sore or short-sighted eyes."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
8th August 2020ce

Templand Mains (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Canmore ID 65264 (go to Links) states that Templand Mains standing stone is the "remains of a stone circle which gives its name to the farm "Temple-land" on which it stands (Scots Mag 1806). Two of the stones were still standing in 1806 (R M F Watson 1901) and one in 1913." Posted by markj99
25th July 2020ce

Emain Macha (Henge)

Easier to add the links :-)

Curse Of Macha


https://visitarmagh.com/stories/live-our-celtic-myths-legends-in-the-ancient-site-of-navan-fort/the-curse-of-macha/

Story of Emain Macha

https://visitarmagh.com/stories/live-our-celtic-myths-legends-in-the-ancient-site-of-navan-fort/the-story-of-emain-macha/

CÚ Chulainn& The Cattle Raid Of Cooley

https://visitarmagh.com/stories/live-our-celtic-myths-legends-in-the-ancient-site-of-navan-fort/cuchullian-the-cattle-raid-of-cooley/
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
16th July 2020ce

Burren (Central, W) (Wedge Tomb)

Tullygobban (Tulaigh an Ghobáin) is though to be named after the Gobán Saor, the master craftsman of Irish folklore. His wife and child are thought to be buried on this hill. ryaner Posted by ryaner
8th July 2020ce

The Three Brothers (Natural Rock Feature)

On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called "The Bride's Chair" was resorted to on the day of marriage by the brides of the village; and in this seat they were enthroned with due solemnity by their friends; but the origin and the object of the custom, which has now fallen in disuse, are unknown.

Not far from Warton Crag are three rocking-stones placed in a line, about forty feet asunder, the largest stone lying in the middle.

A cave is also mentioned by Lucas, named "The Fairy Hole", where dwarf spirits called Elves or Fairies, were wont to resort.
Lancashire Folk-lore: Illustrative of the Superstitious Beliefs and Practices, local customs and usages of the people of the county Palatine. By John Harland and TT Wilkinson, 1867. Online at the Internet Archive.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
21st April 2020ce

Loughanleagh

The name Loughanleagh is derived from the Irish language Lough an Leighis – the lake of the cures. Immediately west of this panel there was a small lake until fairly recent times. Sadly, it has since dried up and is surrounded with forest. Reputedly, this lake had healing waters and mud, a tradition that dates back to pre-christian times. It may have been a sacred Celtic pool and in later times was regarded as being a potent cure for scurvy and skin diseases.

...

Ancient folklore dictates that there was a Cailleach (a goddess) who dropped stones out of her apron that form the cairns on the mountain. Apparently, she was a ferocious being who could take on the appearance of a beautiful maiden. In one infamous encounter it was said that St. Patrick struck and killed the Cailleach.

...

Yet another story has it that the mountain was home to a resident hare who had a big red eye. The hare of Loughanleagh could leap into the lake and return to the otherworld. Hares are today common around the area.

From the Coillte notice board.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
2nd March 2020ce
Edited 8th March 2020ce

Mullynavale (Cairn(s))

The Tomb of Bith

From the archaic strata of Irish myth concerning the original settlement of Ireland, as recorded in 'Lebor Gabála', the first man and woman to land were Adra – The Ancient (alias Ladra) – and his sister Cesair, with their father, Bith, together with a number of subordinate women.

Bith traveled north through Ireland from the Munster landing place and then died at Slieve Beagh, on the Ulster mountain named after him. There the "seventeen magnificent maidens" who accompanied him on the journey to the northern province buried him under the mountain-top cairn they constructed, the Carn More or Great Cairn.

The Irish word 'bith' means "cosmos, world, eternity, everlasting, being and existence." Thus his name, his body, and his cairn carry the load of the entire universe. He brings a truly cosmogonic myth to the southern fringe of Ulster.

From "Ireland, A Sacred Journey" by Michael Dames (Element Books 2000), first published as "Mythic Ireland" by Thames and Hudson, 1992.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th February 2020ce

Skipsea Castle (Artificial Mound)

‘Skipsea, an out of the way Yorkshire village, on the sea-coast between Bridlington and Hornsea, is celebrated for one of the most enduring apparitions on record. ” The White Lady of Skipsea,” as this phantom is styled, has haunted the old castle, of which, now-a-days, little more than the foundations remain, ever since the days of William the Conqueror.

This Skipsea ghost, whose local habitation no native of the place would venture near after nightfall, is described as haunting the Castle mound, and its vicinity, in the form of a beautiful young woman, of mournful aspect, attired in long white drapery.

Occasionally she may be seen flitting about the intrenchments or slopes of the Castle mound, and at times, even in the daylight, she is seen wandering about the precincts of what was formerly her home. No ill effects are reported to follow the appearance of this apparition, whose story is detailed by Mr. F. Ross in his interesting ” Yorkshire Legends and Traditions,’

John Ingram, ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ (1897)

My own thoughts: Traditionally, the White Lady is supposedly the spirit of the wife of Drogo de Bevere, one of William the Conqueror's knights, who was granted the surrounding lands by the new king. She was also the Conqueror's niece, so when Drogo murdered her, he fled to Flanders before he could be punished. Her ghost has been seen ever since... but I'm wondering if she's been around a long time before that!

(as an aside, during the 1970s and 80s I grew up nearby in Hornsea, and a girl in my class at secondary school who lived in Skipsea once claimed to have seen the White Lady "come out of a hedge" and walk across the road which skirts the bailey earthworks before vanishing. She was a bit of a hard-nut, not the sort you'd expect to be up on her medieval legends, but she was adamant about it!)
Posted by Johnnyboy
16th February 2020ce

Ruborough Camp (Hillfort)

It is traditionally supposed that beneath the surface of this camp vast stores of gold and silver are hid in an iron castle, the door of which is guarded by spirits and can only be found at the full moon.

It is stated that many years ago some labourers dug there with the hope of finding the treasure, but were obliged to desist because of the mournful sounds they heard, caused no doubt, by the howling of the wind among the trees.

A story is also told of a Dr Farrer, who lived in the parish and was learned in books and who found out from them how to get into the castle. The day before the full moon he went over the field with a hazel rod, and when he came over the door, the stick stood upright in the ground. The doctor returned at night with his servant and tools for digging and also took his bible with him. He set his servant to work, giving him particular instruction that whatever he saw or heard he was not to utter a word for his life.

The man went on digging, and at last his spade struck on the iron door of the castle, when horrible groans and cries were heard, and spirits began to come out of the door. The man was so frightened that he forgot his master's instructions, and cried out "Lord, have mercy on my soul," when one of the spirits caught him by the leg and would have carried him off, but the doctor put the bible on his head and dragged him out with the other hand.

The pit was closed up, the door banged together, and its position was changed so that no one has been able to find it since.
ETNE.
In the Taunton Courier, 12th April 1958. It rather served him right, expecting his servant to do all the dangerous work. I have a vision a bit like 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'. Also, the castle being made of iron rather discounts the involvement of the fairies in this case.
There is a story told locally of two men, who, many years ago, lived on the Quantock Hills. One day, finding themselves in financial difficulty and not knowing where to obtain any money, they decided to go over to Ruborough Camp, Broomfield, to try to discover some of the money and treasure supposed to have been buried there. As soon as it was night-time they left their homes and with picks and shovels on their backs, proceeded on their way. As they entered the tree-covered lane leading to the camp, they walked with caution in case they disturbed the stags and foxes resting there, but all was well and at last they reached the Camp.

It was a clear moonlit night and no doubt they could see the old castle at Enmore and further away the town of Bridgwater. They found the mound of earth where money and treasure were supposed to have been buried and after removing their coats, started to dig. Suddenly the ground gave away from beneath them and they disappeared.

After some hours had elapsed their relatives at home became alarmed at their not returning and decided to go to look for them. On reaching the old Camp they discovered to their amazement two coats beside a very large hole, but there was no sign of the two men. Being superstitious people they hastily returned to their homes saying that the pixies had captured the two men, who were never seen again.

This story may not be true, but it was told to me by old people living in the district years ago.
A.H., BRIDGWATER.
In the Taunton Courier, 29th March 1958.
These stories seem pretty similar to the ones written down with even more elaboration by the Rev. J W Collins in 1857.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
14th February 2020ce

Wincobank (Hillfort)

Reporter lays the Sheffield "ghost"!
Early to-day I learnt the truth about the Wincobank ghost - there isn't one! All the "ghost's" visitations, beginning eight weeks ago with "a white form standing rigid under a gas lamp," can be accounted for. The "apparitions," like the figure under the gas-lamp, are now declared to have been really live persons ignorant of the scare they were creating.

[...] The "ghost" that disappeared from the top of a banking or ridge on Newman road was undoubtedly a man who had been collecting some white flowers from a garden and had tripped on the banking and fallen backwards. There is not the slightest doubt that a man did fall in this manner at the same place where the "ghost" was seen, and at the same time, and some time later this same man was helped home by a friend. I talked this morning with some of the searchers, who were of the opinion that mysterious "objects" which they had seen were nothing more than the result of white smoke from a smoldering garden fire shimmering against the background of the trees.

[...] But Wincobank is a place with a history, and there are some who will never allow their "ghost" to escape them. If you talk to some of the oldest residents you will hear tales of the old Roman settlement and the ghosts of Roman soldiers which march up and down, and of ghosts of more recent days which are connected with old Wincobank Hall, which is said to have been full of secret passages and panels.
From the Sheffield Independent, 11th August 1937.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th February 2020ce

Cley Hill (Hillfort)

BUGLEY FAIR. - There was a very small attendance of pleasure seekers at this fair, which as usual was held on Cley Hill on Palm Sunday. It is to be hoped that next year a still smaller number will be present.
Straight from the Warminster Killjoy Association. The miserable beggers. Reported in the Warminster and Westbury Journal, 8th April 1882.

Whether a relic of Druidism, or whether merely the vestige of some observance of Roman Catholic times, it has been a well-known custom for many generations to hold certain festivities on Palm Sunday upon Cley Hill, Bidcombe Down, and other lofty elevations in this neighbourhood. Crowds used to assemble in times past on these hills upon this particular Sunday, and amuse themselves in a variety of rough sports, from backsword playing to harmless competitions in rolling down the hill. It may be well imagined that such proceedings were not always of the most orderly kind, and that they were not particularly desirable on Sunday of all days of the week. Fortunately of late years the observance has almost entirely declined, and though a few people still keep up the old custom by walking up the hill and walking down again, no harm is now known to result from their so doing. It was stated that the old observance was to be revived on Sunday last by the Salvation Army, who, it was understood, intended to hold an open air service of a very demonstrative kind upon the top of Cley Hill. It had been feared that such a proceeeding might have revived the old abuses of the day to a certain extent, and it is therefore probably a matter for thankfulness that the Salvation Army did not carry out any such intention.
Warminster and Westbury Journal, 24th March 1883. What's worse, riffraff or noisy evangelisers?


But
The usual practice of setting fire to various parts of Cley Hill on Palm Sunday was again observed this year. On the Warminster Downs, too, a fire was kindled in the afternoon, leaving a big black patch.
Bad luck, sounds like things got even more anarchic.
Wiltshire Times, 26th March 1910.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th February 2020ce
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