The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Cursuswalker’s TMA Blog

Post to the TMA Blog

Windover Hill

I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.

The Long Man of Wilmington — Miscellaneous

23.05.03ce
I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.

The Long Man of Wilmington — Images

23.05.03ce
<b>The Long Man of Wilmington</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

Windover Cursus — Images

23.05.03ce
<b>Windover Cursus</b>Posted by Cursuswalker<b>Windover Cursus</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

Windover Cursus — Fieldnotes

23.05.03ce
I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.

Windover Long Mound — Images

23.05.03ce
<b>Windover Long Mound</b>Posted by Cursuswalker<b>Windover Long Mound</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

Windover Long Mound — Fieldnotes

23.05.03ce
I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.

Windover Bowl Barrow — Images

23.05.03ce
<b>Windover Bowl Barrow</b>Posted by Cursuswalker<b>Windover Bowl Barrow</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

Windover Bowl Barrow — Fieldnotes

23.05.03ce
I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.

Hunter's Burgh — Images

23.05.03ce
<b>Hunter's Burgh</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

ce

ce

ce

The Long Man of Wilmington — Links

05.06.03ce
I am adding some sites on Windover Hill, the site of the Long Man of Wilmington. These photographs were taken nearly 4 years ago and I have only just dug them up!

The landscape above the Long Man is well worth a visit for those who don't mind shapes in the grass with no interesting rocks cluttering up the place. We don't really do rocks in this neck of the woods.

(See the Goldstone, in Brighton, for a notable exception. The only megalith to have had a football ground named after it!)

The fact that a large Neolithic Long Barrow and a large Bronze Age Round Barrow seem to be aligned with the space on which the Long Man now stands is something that I find intriguing. While the Naturalistic figure of the Long Man could only be Roman at the very oldest, I believe there to have been something on this site for a very long time. If only we could see what were the original designs on this hill.
Cursuswalker Posted by Cursuswalker
23rd May 2003ce
Edited 27th May 2003ce


Comments (0)

You must be logged in to add a comment