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Noon Hill (Cairn(s))

[Visited 18/02/18] I've been looking for an excuse to pop up here for a while, so a power walk bit of exercise seemed perfect. I went up the side of winter hill hoping to spot the small cairn on the north edge of the top, but I wasnt sure which of the humps qualified. This one didn't have that issue...

This is a large cairn still clearly defined, with the remains of a kerb on the southern side. The builders making use of a natural knoll to make two sides appear much bigger. The modern pile of stones on top has been flattened slightly since the earlier photos on here and I think is just spoil from the robber or excavation pit in the centre. I had a close look at the possible cups on the large stone nearby, I'm thinking natural due to lack of definition and irregular shape, but the light was very poor. If the stone was standing I think it's been flat for a fair while.

All in all a nice barrow, worth the effort. Access would be easiest from the old road which goes round the bottom off the hill following easily navigable paths.
juamei Posted by juamei
21st February 2018ce

Coed-y-Caerau (Enclosure)

Visited 17.2.18

This month's YAC meeting involved trying to locate several 17th C boundery stones. The event was run by Mark Lewis (who works for the National Museum of Wales) who gave us a running commentry of all the things of interest during our walk. One of the first things he pointed out is the camp/enclosure at Pen-toppen-ash. This was easily seen from the lane which runs along its southern side. Mark said that although the site was built over by the Romans it is of an Iron Age, possibly Bronza Age origin. Mark added that limited excavation work had taken place at the site which showed that the stone walls are very well preserved beneath the turf. The turf covered ramparts of the Roman site were easy to make out.

COFLEIN states:
Site Description There are three co-joined earthwork enclosures at Coed-y-Caerau, Pen Toppen Ash. They are set along the summit crest of a steep ridge above the left bank of the lower Usk. The south-western enclosure is roughly oval, about 84-94m in diameter, defined by a single bank, with an apparent inturned entrance, having traces of an outer circuit on the south and south-west. The central enclosure is sub-circular, about 74-80m in diameter, defined by what appears to be a partially spiralling bank, within a roughly concentric outer embanked enclosure, that springs from the south-west enclosure circuit, about 136-142m in diameter, counterscarped on the north-west and having inturned entrances on the south-east and north-east.

The north-eastern enclosure is possibly a Roman fortlet, though an Iron Age date seems more likely given its association with the other Iron Age features. It is rectangular, about 96m north-east to south-west by 108m, and defined by a single bank with rounded angles. An outer, roughly concentric circuit, generally 166m square, appears to respect the central enclosure
Posted by CARL
18th February 2018ce

South Ythsie (Stone Circle)

17/02/2018 - Must be well over ten years since our last visit. The reason for our trip was the Prop of Ythsie. Neither of us could remember if we had been there last time (the old memory is going).

What a lovely day yesterday was. Little wind, sunshine and blue skies. A good time of year to visit the stones with everything died back. The circle was a little bigger then I remembered, I had it in my head as just a little thing.

It looked just lovely in the sunshine today. We stood in the middle for ages, looking at the stones and then trying to spot skylarks singing high above against the clear blue sky. Magic visit.

The piece from the split stone seems to have gone. Anyone know anything about this?
thelonious Posted by thelonious
18th February 2018ce

Thomastown (Passage Grave)

If this is what they say it is – the remains of a passage grave – then it is of the undifferentiated variety, and diminutive at that.

From the very small road and over the fence, south about 150 metres into the field and very visible is a hillock, about 3 to 4 metres tall. This is very possibly man-made. Exploring around it's top there seems to be cairn rubble remaining. Maybe, when the excavators realised that they had disturbed an ancient grave, they had second thoughts and stopped their handiwork. But not before they had scooped out a sizable chunk of the southern side of the mound, revealing the chamberless passage.

What's left of this speculative passage are about 12 stones, most in an alignment onto cairn T in Loughcrew, with the most south-easterly pair forming an 'entrance'. Alas, were this an entrance, the alignment of the tomb would face away from Cairn T which would be behind the tomb to the north-west. So quaint theories may be just that, quaint but wholly incorrect.

All of the tombs on the hills of Loughcrew either align with other tombs to the east, or with the equinox sunrise in the east, so this ones orientation doesn't exclude the possibility that this is a Loughcrew outlier, along with the mound at Bobsville graveyard with its megalithic art another kilometre to the south.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
17th February 2018ce

Newtonmore (Cairn(s))

From Biallidbeg we walked the couple of miles north east following A86 back to Newtonmore. Sites to the west of Biallidbeg will be explored later this year but today was all about walking around the Newtonmore area.

Cross Calder Bridge and immediately head south to the clump of trees which houses the cairn. Next to this is the home of the famous Newtonmore Shinty Club, scene of some stunning sporting achievements and some other types of achievements by spectators - not today.

The cairn is situated just above the corner were the Rivers Calder and Spey meet with some glorious mountainous scenery. It stands at well over 13 m wide and is well over 1m in height. Tree roots look like giant spiders climbing over cairn material and kerbs.

Beautiful place, I just wonder why I've never spotted it before!

Visited 30/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
17th February 2018ce

Eston Moor Carved Stone (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art)

The front door closes...my new fiancee off to Barcelona with daughters for a girlie minibreak....right, where's the nearest archaeology to her place? Atop the Eston Hills, that's where. Pfft... I scuttled off, parked at Flatts Lane Country Park and made my laborious way up the slippery, icy and muddy path up the scarp towards the Nab and its hillfort. Boy, was the see for miles view over Teeside worth it. One hell of a panorama. The rock art was my prime aim, but I couldn't resist a detour to Mount Pleasant round barrow, with its view to Roseberry Topping en route. Retracing my steps to the scarp path I head for Carr Pond. I know from TMP that my goal is nearby, but, without GPS, finding it in two foot high heather was a swine. On the point of giving up after aligning myself with a photograph from four years previously and coursing to an fro I at last saw what I had come to see off to my right. Worth the hunt, close to two metres and plenty of cupmarks. A trig mark too, but so be it. Still well worth the effort. For those who may want to follow - have I really been the first since Fitzcorraldo fifteen years ago? - simply skirt round the eastern edge of Carr Pond. A reasonably clear path, not on OS, becomes visible. Follow it for about a hundred metres till you reach a patch of tall gorse on the paths right hand side. On your left there will be some nearby silver birch saplings. Leave the path and walk past them through the heather, aiming for a grassy patch beyond. The stone is 22 paces from the path. Simples. There are over thirty other examples of rock art lurking up here, apparently. Good luck. spencer Posted by spencer
13th February 2018ce

The Devil's Arrows (Standing Stones)

A year ago I spent a fruitless hour in the gloaming driving up and down trying to find these giants and felt quite embarrassed by that failure...then a visit to these parts was an extreme rarity, but now, my life unexpectedly changed, I drive up and down the A1 by them several times a week ...funny old world. After finally spotting one recently after several attempts at rubbernecking while driving south to work, an opportunity to finally visit was not to be missed. For those without OS or GPS, all you have to do is turn on to the Roecliffe road in Boroughbridge and park where the new housing on the right side of the road ends. The southernmost stone, behind a gate with a blue plaque inset into a stone in front of it, will be in your left, while the other two can be seen over the hedge on the right side of the road. An ungated field entrance provides ready access. The field they are in was planted with beet when I visited, this being protected by a electric fence. Hi ho...however a walk round the field edge was still possible. Then, thankfully, a section of fence which had dropped to a height which would not cause injury to my most precious possessions and the realisation that the crop around the perimeter had been damaged beyond saleability spurred me to cross and inspect the beasts basking in the late afternoon sun at close quarters. OK, not Rudston, but still, standing next to one and cast your eyes upwards is a hugely impressive experience...plus there are cupmarks aplenty. The traffic noise from the A1 and the presence of new housing nearby cannot marr what still remains a must see site. Go if you can. spencer Posted by spencer
13th February 2018ce

Bryn Celli Ddu Gorsedd (Natural Rock Feature)

The shadow of the gorsedd is to me more important than the gorsedd itself. Visiting the site at the correct time is essential to see this phenomena.
Bryn celli ddu is an exact replica of the gorsedd shadow when the sun is behind you as you look towards the monument itself.
Similar to maes howe, new grange and stone henge the ancients have this way of perfecting light trickery..
Do not miss this when visiting it adds another dimension to an already facinating site..????
broen Posted by broen
10th February 2018ce

Coldrum (Long Barrow)

I don't know why, but Coldrum was a site that to me always looked a little...well, somehow dull and uninviting, from previous pictures. Visiting on a lovely cold and bright February morning, helped win me over though.
I slipped along the frost and mud path, watching white-rumped Bullfinches zip overhead, catching flocks of Fieldfares & Redwings chattering in the trees. Even the tree with the bright ribbons and trinkets was pleasing to the eye in this glorious sunshine.
What a brilliant site this is. Peaceful, and set among open countryside. It reminded me of a 'fatter' Wayland's Smithy. I hadn't expected so many of those big stones to still be there, and the barrow was more defined that I thought.
A chunky, solid place.
Posted by ruskus
6th February 2018ce

The Barmkyn (Hillfort)

04/02/2018 – Not been here before and you know what, I really liked it. Way up is short but a little gorsy and a bit of windthrow to get round. The fort sits in a lovely clearing. Nice size outer wall, very tricky to see any inner wall. After a rainy start to the day, the sun came out whilst we were there which made our visit. Well worth a trip if you are visting Old Keig RSC. thelonious Posted by thelonious
5th February 2018ce

Satter Hill (Cairn(s))

04/02/2018 - Been over Satter Hill a few times but didn't remember the cairn. Made sure to have a look for it this time. Same route as Drew's. Old maps list it as 'a pile of stones' and it's hard to argue with that. Not much to see but the view and walk was nice. A little rainy first thing but nothing too bad and a very light dusting of snow on top. thelonious Posted by thelonious
4th February 2018ce

Biallidbeg (Cairn(s))

After a good nights refreshment in Kincraig I awoke bright and hazy ready for a good hike. Wee B was in good form so we were taken south and dropped off at Biallidbeg Farmstead on the A86.

We jumped the gate and headed up the small slope then headed north east. This is an area covered in cairns and hut circles, the biggest cairn was our aim. It stands at well over 10m wide and is almost 1m high. The remains of a long robbed cist can be seen in the centre of the cairn. An impressive tree also seems to trying to protect and keep the site warm.

A stunning start to the day with impressive views to the Cairngorms and Strathspey. Also a return visit to this place is needed. Roll on the warmer weather.

Visited 30/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd February 2018ce

Kincraig (Chambered Cairn)

Just before heading into Kincraig for some light refreshment and rest there was time to visit the chamber cairn near the village. From Loch An Eilein car park we took the road back to the B970, a very twisty road indeed through Feshie Bridge until the first minor road heading west. This follows the northern shore of Loch Insh to Kincraig. Head through the village to the B9152 turning north. Take the first subway underneath the A9 and park near the group of small farm buildings, the cairn is a short distance behind. There is plenty room to park.

All that remains of this once massive cairn is the chamber, split into two and the scant outline of its former surroundings. This had been over 17m at some point. Some kerbs still remain.

Canmore's description 'This heavily robbed chambered cairn is situated at the upper limit of improved pasture roughly midway between the newly constructed blacksmith’s shed and a small coniferous plantation, some 425m to the ENE of Kincraig House. The cairn lies on relatively flat ground and appears to have been terraced on the S, with the ground rising gently to the N and W and a tongue of natural outcrop extending out to the SE. Oval on plan, it measures 17m from ENE to WSW by 14.8m transversely, and is defined by three kerb stones on the SW, S and SSE, and another that appears to have fallen outwards on the ENE. On the N and NW the outer edge of the cairn has been reduced to a low stony bank. Loose stones lie across the interior and several large angular blocks are still visible on the SE. The chamber, orientated ENE to WSW, measures 3.2m by 0.9m internally and is divided into two compartments by a low septal slab. The innermost compartment survives as two upright stones on its S side and a back-slab, the latter the tallest of the chamber standing 0.68m in height. Two displaced stones immediately behind these may be capstones or corbels from the roof of the chamber that have slipped backwards. The second compartment comprises a pair of upright stones and another adjacent to that on the N set just outside though not overlapping. A further 0.7m to the E there is another earthfast stone which may also belong to the chamber but now appears to be displaced.'

Just before leaving I looked south towards Newtonmore and Kingussie. The next day would see a lot of miles walked.

Visited 29/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd February 2018ce

Dundee Law (Hillfort)

28/01/2018 - Heading back from Edinburgh to Aberdeen on the train we decided to stop off at Dundee for a walk. We didn’t pick the best of weather days for it. Got off the train just after nine and 10 minutes later the rain started and didn’t really let up for the rest of the walk.

Very quiet Sunday morning streets as we headed first to Balgay Hill. Nice hill with an observatory on top. Don’t think there is anything old here but it look a good place for a bit of megalithic.

Heading east we moved on to Dundee Law. Easy to get a little lost in the streets between the two but nothing too bad. A short climb first through allotments and then steps got us to the top. I guess the views from here are great on a sunny day but today the low cloud and rain put paid to that.

Hard to see if we were looking at any bits of the original fort as we walked around the top. Impressive war memorial and trig there as well.

We headed south back down through the streets to the train station. Overall a nice quiet walk to visit Dundee Law hillfort. Worth going on a clear day just for the views.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
2nd February 2018ce

Edinburgh Castle (Hillfort)

27/01/2018 – After a very windy walk round Arthur’s Seat in the morning we made our way up the Royal Mile to Edinburgh Castle.

Our siege on the castle was quickly halted at the entrance by a very nice woman who informed us that our rucksacks were too big to take in (44L size in case you were wondering, pack small if you visit). With our attack thwarted so quickly we made the slow walk back to where we were staying to regroup.

One hour later we were back. Travelling light we made it past the guard this time and into the castle. Our second assault again came to an abrupt halt. This time by a long snaking chain of people. Quickly realising this might work to our advantage and offer us a way through we joined the queue and tried to blend in. What seemed like hours later (probably nearer 10 minutes) we reached the head and another nice person to deal with. This time we made it past first go though not unscathed, my wallet took a direct hit on the way (£34 for the two of us).

Finally we made it into the main areas, we went into full tourist mode and started taking photos of anything and everything so not to draw attention to ourselves. High point is a little debatable but I liked the rock outside St Margaret’s Chapel though I felt a little silly standing there for the obligatory photo. Views from the castle are wonderful and it’s such a good location with a history that stretches back through the mists of time.

We thought our ruse of acting like tourists had been rumbled when a loud bang nearly gave me a heart attack. A quick scan of the map we had been given informed us it was just the one o’clock gun firing and they do it every day. Relieved we headed further inside and went to look for the Scottish Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny. The security was tight and my belly was starting to rumble so we left empty handed and made for the cafe. Turns out we weren’t the only folk looking to get their hands on plenty of loot, nice food though despite the price.

With happy belly again and all batteries walked we made our way out. I sadly resisted the urge to sit on a cannon for a photo as the oldest person doing so looked about 5 years old and I didn’t want to draw attention to myself (bit rubbish getting old, I should care less what people think but I like to stay hidden in life).

Yes it's a bit of a dear do to enter and nothing megalithic to look but there’s a wonderful sense of a continuing history to the place as you walk around. It’s well worth a visit.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
1st February 2018ce

Creagan Ruighe Dhughaill (Cairn(s))

Just to the south east of Creag A Chait over some treacherous underfoot conditions is another large cairn. The site at Creagan Ruighe Dhughaill is in a small glen which blocks the view of Loch Gamhna. Views of Loch An Eilein can just about be glimpsed through the trees.

Some large blocks are near this cairn making it relatively easy to find. A small ditch can just about be seen surrounding the site. It is an odd shape for this area being rectangular, 11m by 7m sitting at 1m high amongst some trees. Just like the nearby Chait the scenery of the mountains is spectacular.

After a good look round it was back to the shores of Loch An Eilein via the southern shore of Loch Gamhna, sadly the crannog was covered in water so, happily, another trip needed. The path back to the car park on the southern shore is varied to say the least. Sometimes good, sometimes terrible and sometimes invisible.

Still its a good way to explore which is what we spent the day doing for a few hours before heading to the cairn at Kincraig.

Visited 29/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
1st February 2018ce

Creag A' Chait (Cairn(s))

On a cold misty but dry morning we started walking from the car park at Loch An Eilein Gate. To reach here take the B9152 from Coylum Bridge/Inverdruie (great name) and head south. Take the first minor road heading south east that ends at the car park.

Follow the track south to the beautiful shores of Loch an Eilein, which was mirror calm, with its medieval castle still standing proudly. Keep going until a junction in the track near Loch An Eilein's south west shore. We headed or attempted to head straight south. This short cut ended up being the longest route as we climbed over Kennapole Hill, which provided stunning views of the snow covered surrounding mountains. Eventually after a few bumps and scrapes we found the site. A difficult place to reach.

The large cairn, being over 20m wide, is covered in heather but glimpses of turf reveal cairn material. Several large stones also surround the site well hidden amongst the vegetation. Only when standing well back can the height of the cairn be seen, it is well over 2m in height. To the east is Loch Gamhna obscured by a small hill. To the north the southern shores of Loch An Eilein and the snow covered Ord Ban.

A beautiful place!

Visited 29/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
30th January 2018ce

Delfour (Clava Cairn)

Totally agree with G, G and Vicster. This is a fantastic site with fantastic views. Sadly, on this visit, bits of farm waste was dotted about the site. I tidied up what I could by throwing it over the fence into a field with more rubbish in it.

Directions.

Take the B9152 from Coylum Bridge and head south. When the Alvie Gate Lodge is reached head west under the first subway. If coming north from Kincraig its the second subway. Follow the signposts to Easter Delfour, which will lead straight to the site.

Handy thing these subways!

23/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th January 2018ce

Creag Mheadhonach (Cairn(s))

From the Milton cairn head uphill, this is very steep in places, in a southish direction. We forced our way through bogs, trees, scattered rocks, holes and streams. Somehow major injury was avoided and we finally found the cairn. Near the top there is the remains of a small loch, the cairn is on the south west side on a slight uphill.

Nothing much remains just a small mound around 6m wide being no more 0.5m high. The cist stone can be felt underfoot as can other stones. Sadly almost impossible to photograph. The views on the other hand are tremendous looking down on the Spey Valley. Cairns to the east have gone thanks to forestry.

On our way down, meaning straight down, we took an interesting route almost copying the Dun Dearduil uphill route. We headed west looking for a track which we eventually found. Once back into the trees the climb down is very steep, on a couple of a occasions I used my backside to get down some of the way. Some deer passing nearby obviously had a good laugh at my antics. At the bottom is the Milton burn which this time was waded and jumped. From there it is a fairly gentle climb to the track. We had every intention of heading to a nearby dun but the weather was closing in, therefore Delfour entered the agenda.

Love this area, the dun will be found when the snow goes.

23/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th January 2018ce

Clune Wood (Ring Cairn)

Visited: January 20, 2018

I have visited Clune Hill and its Recumbent Stone Circle more times than I can remember over the years. When time is limited, the forest walks surrounding this site provide atmospheric short excursions. But what seems to have escaped the notice of most contributors to TMA is the ring cairn immediately adjacent to the east of the RSC. A couple of photographs of the cairn do appear on the RSC page, but surprisingly, this site has hitherto received no fieldnote.

Clune Hill Ring Cairn extends some ten metres in width and rises to around ¾ metre in height, but because of the uneven nature of the terrain here—covered with tussocks of grass and heathery hummocks, not to mention the ever-encroaching bracken—only the neat central chamber catches the eye: the edges of the cairn are ill-defined and there is no outer kerb to be seen.

There is a fine image from 'Greywether' which shows the central chamber of the Ring Cairn in 2005 when it appeared to have recently been cleared of vegetation.

This chamber, largely overgrown by heather and bracken, particularly during the summer months, has been built of irregular, rounded stones, which are particularly prominent in the northeast quadrant. The almost continuous kerb consists of graded boulders which increase in size and height towards the southwest: the tallest kerbstone, at 0.8 metres in height, stands on the SSW and the smallest on the NE. There is a gap in the kerb towards its south, about three metres from the nearest stone of the RSC (orthostat No 4), but Aberdeenshire Council's website describes the ring cairn as 'incomplete', and states that there is no evidence for a passage leading to the cairn edge.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
24th January 2018ce

Dumbarrow Hill (Stone Fort / Dun)

Dumbarrow provided its builders with three sides of natural defences. The north side is very steep and during our visit being attacked by marauding sheep, the south slightly less steep and the west, once again slightly less steep. The west also appears to have an entrance not noted by Canmore. However the main entrance is in the east with facing stones clearly marking the doorway. Once again I disagree with Canmore. I think the east had defences natural or man made. The farmer at nearby Dumbarrow Farm confirmed that many dry stane dykes in the area had been built from stones from the dun and nearby long gone cairns.

One thing that cannot be disputed is the impressive views in all areas especially the snow covered mountains to the west glistening in the distance. Myths of King Nechtan (see folklore) and famous battles surround this area. Certainly at the time when we visited, fast approaching darkness, the dun had an atmosphere of otherworldliness.

From Friockheim we headed south on the A933, then the B961 west, take the minor road north west at the first crossroads, go over Dumbarrow bridge, past Dumbarrow Farm and take the road north east to Hillkirk. We were given permission by the farmer to park who told us about the destruction of nearby cairns and the removal of stones during the 1800s. The dun, in its wonderful location, is to the north east of the farm buildings.

Visited 28/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
23rd January 2018ce

Red Hill (Cist)

20/01/2018 – It had been over ten years since our last visit to Benaquhallie. Don’t know why really, it’s just a short drive away from where we live and it’s a nice quiet walk with good views. High chance of avoiding humans all day as well which is always a good thing. Guessing most folk start from the south but to make more of a day of it we started near Tillyfourie, to the north. Good parking at the start of the forest track (NJ 6390 1262).

Main point of the day was to revisit Benaquhallie via Red Hill (couldn’t really remember if I’d been there last time). The night before I’d had a look on the internet and found two cairns marked on the old OS maps. One just south of the trigpoint on Benaquhallie at NJ 6070 0859 and the other to the north in Culthibert Wood (NJ 6217 1122). Aberdeenshire SMR also had two possible cist burials on Red Hill at NJ 6182 0999 and NJ 6194 1003. So the day was planned - Tillyfouire to Benaquhallie via Red Hill and back, with a look at two cairns to see if they might be old and two possible cists. Sounded good to me.

Very cold start to the day, 6 below and it never made it back up to 0. Easy walking along the track to its highest point (NJ 6255 1028) where we left it to head SW to Red Hill. The trees had been felled since our last visit so the views were great on this cold, clear and sunny day.

Finding the cists was a little tricky as the heather is deep here. First one (NJ 6194 1003) all we could find was a single stone. It could have been anything and nothing. Second one (at NJ 6182 0999) was much better and really looked like a small cist to me.

We walked on to the cairn near the trigpoint for a brew and a bite to eat. It’s a large modern cairn and although there is a hint of a bigger footprint, my guess would be not old.

Heading back we skirted round the south side of Red Hill and then headed back the way we came. Nice views down to Old Kirk of Tough stone circle from here.

Back along the track through Culthibert Wood we took a detour off to see the cairn at NJ 6217 1122. Very small lose pile of stones. Though it’s been there a few hundred years, my guess is it’s not much older than that.

It had been a good day out (apart from a blister on my foot, which was annoying as I never get blisters). Fine hill and an interesting walk. The cist looked good to me, if a little worse for wear and it was good fun trying to find.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
21st January 2018ce

Bruce's Camp (Hillfort)

13/01/2018 - Earlyish start, least it felt like it as the lazy sun is still having a bit of a lie in at this time of year (I can't wait for the longer days). We started from Port Elphinstone and walked the Old Kemnay Road which is a nice beech tree lined track nowadays. Good views down to the River Don and Bennachie in the distance along here.

The track took us to Duncan's Forest and then we made a similar climb to Drew's, up to Bruce's Camp. No problems really access wise, it's pretty open woodland to the top.

In fact everything was going OK until near the top when about 30 seconds after mentioning Drew's fence problem from his fieldnotes to Mrs T, Bruce’s Camp decided to claim another TMAer. All I will say is that there was barbed wire and blood! There’s a curse on this hill, I tell ye.

We did make it to the top which is a nice open area. The ramparts are pretty overgrown.

I forget to look for the cup marked rock which is a little annoying. I’ll have to go back sometime which is OK as it was a nice walk.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
13th January 2018ce

Lansdown Barrows (Round Barrow(s))

Visited yesterday. The larger barrow is extremely overgrown with brambles and several small trees. It is difficult to see where it begins, but I would estimate around 30-40 feet in diameter. At the centre it reaches a height of 5-6 feet. I remember it being a much more impressive feature a couple of decades ago, very visible from the road when driving past, before it became as scrubbed over as it is now.

There is a drawing of this barrow from 1783 on the British Library website, just behind Rose Cottage with a large ash tree growing on it. http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/topdrawings/a/largeimage85779.html

The tree is also visible on the Harcourt Masters Turnpike map of 1786/7, where mound is shown as a very prominent feature. The other two barrows are not shown on the map.

The largest of the confluent round barrows in the field is around 3 feet in height, the smaller one to the NW is around 2 feet.

The field is marked on the 1841 tithe map as 'Fair Close', presumably this was where the Lansdown Fair was held.
Posted by swallowhead
11th January 2018ce

Cairn Knap (Cairn(s))

After taking our time and absorbing the wonderful cairn and views at Guthrie Hill we moved on further south near to the small town of Friockheim. We parked at the towns cemetery and walked south on a decent track into Friock Wood. Follow the track to the southern border of the wood, the cairn is in the middle of the field. Easy to get to with no climbs and no fences.

The cairn is surrounded by a dry stane dyke, which sadly, has fallen a little on the north west. This allows access to the cairn. Like Guthrie it has taken a battering, unlike Guthrie it has managed to retain its shape. Described by some as a round cairn it has been quarried, houked and excavated but still remains 30m wide and 3m high. The excavations also show quite a lot of cairn material allowing us to see how the site was built. It also revealed two cists that contained human bones.

Trees have also fallen giving an extra sense of age. It is good that even in an agricultural area sites like this still survive. Excellent place!!

Visited 28/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th January 2018ce
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