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Drumlohan (Souterrain)

Another of Waterford's amazing sites left in a disgraceful condition, overgrown with nettles and thistles. We approached from the west, through an open gate and down a farm track. I wasn't sure that we had found the right place until we were right on top of it, the substantial standing ogham stones hidden by the summer growth.

Once again I had a go at tidying the place up, giving the stones a bit of breathing space. The enclosure is in a large pasture field on a working farm and you would wonder had it had any visitors this summer. The monument is in state "care" but with the nearby Waterford Greenway now very popular, could this care not be more actual than theoretical?

Five stones stand at the edge of the cut of the souterrain, all former lintels or roofstones of the reasonably short passage. Steps lead down into the passage where more ogham stones line the sides. There are three unmarked roofstones remaining over the passage, two almost midway down the passage and one over the end of the souterrain. Most of the passage is made up of dry-stone walling.

Even with all the herbage, the power of this place couldn't be dimmed. I was affected by the stones here and the remnants of the souterrain more than I would be at a lot of the 'show' sites along the Tramore dolmen trail. Which is not to say that I'll be back anytime soon, if ever – but who knows?
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th August 2018ce

South Down Sleight (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery)

A scatterred group of barrows, including a group of three north of the military road from Warminster to Imber. The single one is actually on Summer down but this site name is already in use for a different place in Wiltshire so to avoid confusion I have added it here.
The group of 3 are listed as National Monument 10091 and the single as 10089. These were taken from a bus on one of the few days this area is open to the public.
formicaant Posted by formicaant
18th August 2018ce

Dun Kearstach (Stone Fort / Dun)

It is said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder... an oft-quoted axiom implying, I guess, that just about everything can be 'beautiful' to someone, somewhere, at some time or another. Depends upon your point of view... whether the sleek form of a fast car floats your boat (incidentally I'm with Pete Shelley here), that packed beach upon the Costa del Sol, or even the tribalistic shenanighans inherent in watching people kicking/carrying/whacking a ball around a field. To be honest I find the ideal of beauty much harder to pin down, to define. A nebulous, intangible concept seemingly spontaneously occurring during perceived moments of heightened awareness; of emotional fulfilment, perhaps? Those occasions when the senses appear to align, attaining optimal equilibrium. Or something like that. Arguably it is better not to attempt to define, but simply to experience? Suffice to say I know beauty when I happen to chance across it. My beauty.

A case in point, perhaps, is to witness dawn beside the chambered cairn at An Sithean, the monument presenting a breath-taking aesthetic vision harmonising with the elegantly sweeping profile of Beinn na Caillich towering above and beyond, the cloudless sky emphatically refuting Skye's 'Misty Isle' epithet. It is, in the absence of any more appropriate adjective, simply spellbinding. Yeah, a 'treasure so rare that even devils might care', to quote a certain Mr Ferry from '73. The moment can't last, of course, a passing bus highlighting the obvious dilemma intrinsic to current public transport solutions by emitting an all-consuming cloud of noxious diesel fumes choking both myself and the otherwise alacritous neighbourhood sheep. Yeah, clearly there is no simple answer to the conservational issues raised through simply 'getting around'.

The landscape is overwhelming in its sheer, naked grandeur as I approach Loch Slapin, passing beyond the reedy waters of Loch Cill Chriosd and nearby churchyard-cum-stone circle, the jagged skyline of Bla Bheinn and its gabbro cohorts rising majestically to the west presenting perhaps every child's vision of what a mountain should look like. Well, it certainly appeals to the child within me, illustrating the unequivocal truth that reality can be every bit as intense as fantasy. No need to indulge in fairy tales when travelling upon Skye, methinks. But I digress...

So... a little before Torrin a very rough single track road exits left to access the foreshore at Camas Malag, the environs popular with 'overnighters' possessing a, shall we say, more communal ethic than I? From the bay a track heads southward, hugging the coast toward the abandoned hamlet of Suisnish, presumably still standing mute testimony to the appalling enforced clearances of yore. It is a fine walk, worthwhile in its own right and, perhaps not surprisingly, reminiscent of another, some way to the west, accessing Rubh an Dunain from Glen Brittle. The route, otherwise defined by a pregnant silence highlighting the absence of those locals who once called this coastline 'home', is enlivened by several streams cascading into Loch Slapin upon abruptly running out of hillside, although it is the vistas across the loch which naturally hold the beguiled traveller's attention. Eventually the track swings to the left approaching light woodland and the bridge across the Allt Poll a'Bhainne; here, after refilling the water bottle, Dun Kearstach can be discerned upon a prominent moorland rise to the east, within Glen Boreraig. As Les notes, there is no path.....

For me, Dun Kearstach is a magical place, a miniature 'Lost World' plateau arguably too diminutive to support even one of Conan Doyle's giant sauropods. Exquisitely positioned, the coastal scenery, gazing across to Sgurr Alasdair, sentinel peak of the legendary Black Cuillin, is of the highest calibre... certainly when viewed under today's exceptional weather conditions. The location is highly defensible, too, the flanks of the little knoll falling sharply to the floor of the glen and thus accentuating the limited strength of the single drystone wall enclosing the summit. OK, not an awful lot of masonry courses remain in situ but, with clear evidence of an entrance to the west (facing the approach of least resistance), it represents more than enough archaeology to emphasise the point that the previous incumbents knew exactly what they were doing. And let's face it, what with the Allt a' Ghairuillt flowing immediately below to the north fresh water wasn't exactly going to be a problem, was it? All in all this must have been a pretty epic place to live.

As I lie back and take it all in... it becomes increasingly apparent that here, reclining recumbent upon this little grassy plateau overlooking Loch Slapin in the sunshine, I have (albeit with Les's help) chanced upon another obscure moment of sheer natural beauty upon this special island. Ultravox's 'Lament' - the video incidentally filmed around these parts - worms its way into my consciousness and it occurs to me that it is the perceived sense of melancholia, suggested, perhaps, by remnants of times past permanently set in stone within the landscape (whether funerary cairn, defensive enclosure or deserted clearance village) interacting with the haunting aesthetic of the wild mountains... that accords Skye its enigmatic, ethereal status. The human element. All the triumphs, all the tragedies, all the humdrum moments of everyday life.

Curiosity overtakes me and I clamber up the hillside to the east and I'm reminded of the lower settlement upon Foel Offrwm in far off Gwynedd. But, to be honest, Dun Kearstach is unique. I am reluctant to leave and break the spell, only eventually doing so in order to visit the two further duns guarding the northern aspect of the loch. As it transpires this is easier said than done - both the leaving and the subsequent visits, particularly that to the larger of the two fortified enclosures, Dun Mor - but there you are.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
18th August 2018ce
Edited 19th August 2018ce

Rimbeck - Warburg (Chambered Tomb)

The gallery grave of Rimbeck - Warburg lies northeast of the village Rimbeck and belongs to the Hessian-Westphalian galleries. To reach the site leave the B7 into Elisabethstrasse, after about 430m when the road bends to left continue straight ahead into Zur Märk. After about 250m there is a slight right bend and you are in the road Zum Weissen Holz. Continue on this road for about 500m until you reach the forest. Park here and use the middle forest track which goes uphill for about 450m, where a little beaten path leaves the main track to the left. You should notice the information board of the tomb from here.

The 12 m long and 2 m wide gallery grave is embedded in the ground. While the supporting stones are largely preserved, no capstones were found. The site originally consisted of a chambered tomb completely covered with stone slabs, which lay under a mound and only connected to the outside world by a short corridor with a Port-hole slab (German: Seelenloch) still visible today.

The large pieces of rock from sandstone, which served as the building material, do not occur at the site. They had to be brought over a distance of 3.5km.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hertingshausen (Standing Stone / Menhir)

The menhir of Hertingshausen is located on the edge of a small wood, north of the K22 between Baunatal and Hertingshausen. It is a strangely wedged shaped 2m high stone that looks like much of it has broken away and is now missing.

Like the Hünstein - Großenritte in Baunatal this menhir consists of quartzite, which was probably broken from the Hertingshäuser cliffs.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hünstein - Großenritte (Standing Stone / Menhir)

The Hünstein of Großenritte is now located at the Hünsteinplatz in the midst of a relatively new residential estate in Baunatal in the district of Großenritte. It is 2,75m high and weights about four tons.

It consists of a quartzite that is not present here. A material analysis showed that the Hünstein was probably broken from the Hertingshäuser cliffs, which are about 3.8km away.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg (Chambered Tomb)

The gallery grave Lautariusgrab (Gudensberg) lies about 500m southeast of the L3218 road between Metze and Edermünde. There is a car park (Gestecke) where a forest track to the tomb starts.

The tomb has a rectangular layout of 10m long and 5m wide, it is assumed that the tomb was not covered with stones, but with wood.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Taken from one of the (red) information board:

The Lautariusgrab is a prehistoric cultural monument from the Neolithic Wartberg culture in the Gudensberger city forest. The origin of the name is unclear.

The prehistoric site consists of an above-ground burial chamber with two open antechambers. The tomb is unique in northern Hesse because of its shape and the purely aboveground construction. Other plants of the Wartberg culture are the gallery tombs of Züschen and Calden, which were partially sunk into a slight slope or covered with a mound. The tomb has a rectangular layout with a length of 10 m and a width of 5 m. It was probably covered with wood. The processed stones are made of quartzite and basalt. The floor of the grave was paved.

Settlements of the Wartberg culture are less than a kilometer away on the Gudensberger Bürgel and Güntersberg.

In 1932 the tomb was first uncovered and examined. Only a few skeletal remains in the form of bone fragments, a few fragments of cups and two stone ax made of siliceous rock were found. This small number of finds is explained by the above-ground construction and the rapid decay after ritual use. It makes dating difficult, but it can be assumed that the grave dates from around 3500-3000 BC. Chr. The finds are today kept in the Hessian State Museum in Kassel.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Züschen I (Chambered Tomb)

Züschen I, classified as a gallery grave or a Hessian-Westphalian stone cist, lies east of Züschen and north of the road L3218 to Lohne. There is a small car park about 100m south of the tomb. According to Wikipedia the German term of gallery grave for a certain type of megalithic sites is derived from the French term Allée couverte.

The rectangular chamber is 20m long and 3.5m wide. It is built of rectangular sandstone slabs, which can't be found on this valley side of the Elbebach. Each long wall consists of a row of 12 slabs, one of which is missing. The narrow walls consist of a single slab each. Some of the stones (b1 and b2) contain some incised carvings, comparable to prehistoric rock art elsewhere in Europe.

Due to increasing vandalism, like the engraving of names and signs, the tomb was roofed and fenced in 1986. According to the display panel, it is still possible to visit the tomb from inside, a key can be obtained from the museum in Fritzlar located in the Hochzeithaus (wedding house).

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
16th August 2018ce

Ballynamona Lower (Court Tomb)

We visited Ballynamona on a drizzly, mid-August day, a day untypical of the sunny summer we've had this year. Ballynamona is deep in the Waterford Gaelteacht, a place where the usual bi-lingual signposting is dropped and everything is in Irish only. However, this convention in turn is dropped when you get to the end of the driveable track, where one neighbour has seen fit to post a "BEWARE, ATTACK DOG LOOSE" sign right next to the last, tree-lined track that leads to the field where the tomb lies. This is very intimidating, and it almost worked, but I reckoned I would never come back here and I really wanted to see Ireland's most southerly court tomb, so with a bit of convincing and coaxing of 9-year-old LM we opened the gate and headed up the track (in the end there was no attack dog to be seen or heard, signs like these judiciously used to put off the intrepid amateur archaeologist and the stoner hippy alike).

At the end of the track we reached a barley field that had been harvested quite a while earlier in the year and headed over to where the tomb lies. I had expected a fenced-in tomb in a clearing at the side of the field, judging from the shots here and elsewhere. What we found, eventually, was a bracken, gorse and bramble covered neglected mess. The fence is gone, or buried under the bracken, and the bracken and gorse has overgrown the tomb.

I was disheartened and disappointed. The gallery of the tomb was visible, but all the court stones were inundated. I took a few shots and started to head off, saddened by the neglect and seeming disdain. We reached the edge of the barley field and talked about how we'd probably never return - this is an isolated spot, not really on the way to anywhere. LM asked me why I bother and I said without the likes of us, these sites could be lost altogether (there was a faint track to the tomb from the barley field so someone does come here occasionally).

We turned back and headed through the jungle. Neither of us were dressed for the brambles but we persevered. Rooting around by the large stone on the western arm of the court I found the Bord Fáilte sign and its post, dumped there unceremoniously. I used this to tamp down the bracken around the gallery to give it some breathing space. I also found one of the staves from the fence which I used to bash back some of the gorse and brambles. I tamped down the bracken within the chamber/gallery of the tomb with my feet. And there it was, quite an impressive court tomb, with stones remaining on both arms of its court and a fairly complete gallery. Uncovered and opened out, the tomb regained a bit more majesty and we were grateful to the ancestors for leaving this place for us.

Leaving, I felt a certain sense of self-justification – this stone-hunting is not everyone's cup of tea, it's mainly the domain of eccentrics and, eh, stoners. It flashes into the broader consciousness occasionally when a spectacular like the recent stuff at Newgrange and Dowth makes the news. And then it's forgotten about once again, left to the likes of LM and me to uncover once again, attack dogs in our own right.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce

Hilgenstein - Werkel (Standing Stone / Menhir)

The menhir Hilgenstein is situated in the south of the village of Werkel, east of a development area in the street Am Hilgenstein.

The menhir is 1.5m high and 0.5m (base) respectively 0.3 m (top) wide. As there were no archaeological finds found nearby, it could not be dated beyound doubt. It is assumed that the current location is not identical to the original location.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

D47 Emmen (Angelslo) (Hunebed)

Like its neighbour D46 Emmen (Angelslo), D47 Emmen (Angelslo) has been swallowed by the city of Emmen some time ago. I'm not a big fan of 'urbanized' megalithic sites, as I always find that they lack atmosphere, which is, beside the site itself, also important for me. In the case of these two Hunebeds I have to admit, that the impacts of the surrounding residential settlements are not too disturbing.

D47 Emmen (Angelslo) is a mid size Hunebed (6.9 x 2m), consisting originally of five capstones. In a restoration in 1997, two random boulders were added but not noticeable in the meantime anymore. The supporting stones and end stones are all present and are located almost entirely below the ground level.

The 'official' (signed) approach by car is to park in Heesackers street (around house no. 27) , which is right in the middle between the two Hunebeds and walk to each site from here.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

D46 Emmen (Angelslo) (Hunebed)

Like its neighbour D47 Emmen (Angelslo), D46 Emmen (Angelslo) has been swallowed by the city of Emmen some time ago. I'm not a big fan of 'urbanized' megalithic sites, as I always find that they lack atmosphere, which is, beside the site itself, also important for me. In the case of these two Hunebeds I have to admit, that the impacts of the surrounding residential settlements are not too disturbing.

D46 Emmen (Angelslo) is a mid size Hunebed (9.5 x 3.6m), consisting originally of five capstones, the middle capstone is not present anymore. The supporting stones and end stones are all present.

The 'official' (signed) approach by car is to park in Heesackers street (around house no. 27) , which is right in the middle between the two Hunebeds and walk to each site from here.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen) (Hunebed)

D45 Emmerdennen is one of the most beautiful Hunebeds in The Netherlands. It is located on a small clearing in the woods, about 650m north of Scheper Zieckenhuis (hospital). Although the busy town of Emmen is nearby, the place emits a certain kind of tranquility and peace. The Hunebeds lies on a small hill, which also adds to the grandeur of this place.

It is one of the larger Hunebeds (18.5 x 4.5m), there are still six of originally nine capstones remaining (three capstone of the eastern section are missing) and two of the entrance stones. The eastern remaing capstone is remarkable large. From the originally 38 kerbstones only 13 are still present, 25 have disappeared.

Highly recommended!

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

Clerkhill (Broch)

Visited: June 26, 2018

About a kilometre north of Bettyhill on the north coast of Sutherland stand the ruined remains of Clerkhill Broch. The prominent mound where the broch once stood is now fenced in and is private property. Part of the mound on the east has been excavated, and a house built, while on the very summit now stands a rotary washing dryer.

Even Canmore has little to say about Clerkhill other than that it is:
" a possible broch in Farr, Sutherland, consisting of a turf-covered, quarried mound on the end of a ridge, the east half of which has been removed to make way for the outbuildings of a croft. On the west side is a part of the basal course of the outer wall of a broch-like structure forming an arc about 9.0 metres long."
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
12th August 2018ce
Edited 14th August 2018ce

Wotanstein - Maden (Standing Stone / Menhir)

The menhir Wotanstein is situated on the south-west corner of the village of Maden, east of the road K9, which leads from Maden to Obervorschütz. The site is signed, it is less than 50m from the road.

The menhir is 2.12m high, 1.2 m wide, and 0.55 m thick, it lies in a small clearing framed by hedges and trees.

Why a park bench with its back was set directly on the Menhir remains an eternal mystery to me. I would have placed it at a respectful distance and with a view on the menhir.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

taken from the information board:

The Wotanstein in Maden

The Wotanstein (also "Wodanstein"), is considered one of the most imposing megalithic monuments in Germany. As megaliths (from ancient Greek megas = "large" and lithos = "stone") one refers to large, often uncut stone blocks that were used as building blocks for grave and cultural facilities or erected as monoliths and positioned in stone settings. The Western and Northern European megalithic structures were all built in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The rite of setting up such menhirs (Breton: men = stone, hir = long) was taken over from present-day France.

The uniqueness of the Wotanstein is that it consists of non-local quartzite. This material can only be found again in the area of ??Borken, around 25 km away. It is believed that the foundling was brought here and placed in the 3rd millennium BC.

An early ritual or religious use is very likely due to the conspicuous accumulation of similar menhirs in the area between Fritzlar and Kassel. The stone was then later (from the 1st millennium before Christ) probably used by the Chatti in the sacral landscape Mattium as a place of worship of Wodan (also "Wotan", main deity in the Nordic-Germanic mythology).

The stone was first mentioned in 1407 as "the long stone at Madin". According to oral tradition, the stone has been excavated in the 7-year War (1756-1763) because treasures were suspected under him. But only the remains of human bones were found, and it was realized that it was as deep buried in the earth as it is above the earth.

According to legend, the devil wanted to smash the stone from the Lamsberg on the first Christian church of Boniface in Fritzlar, which had been built from the wood of the Donareiche. However, it bounced off the pre-occupied shield of the Archangel Michael and drove to the place where it is today, into the earth. The impressions and holes on the stone were interpreted as handprints of the devil (devil's claw).
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
12th August 2018ce

Achvarasdal (Broch)

Visited: June 29, 2018

Just a few hundred metres from the village of Reay on Scotland's far north lies one of the largest brochs in Scotland: Achvadadsal. After heading east on the A836 out of Reay, the road dog-legs sharply northward. Almost immediately, turn right following the road for about 600 metres and park outside the woodland surrounding Achvadadsal Care Home. It's just a short walk along woodland paths, following 'broch' signs, to the broch.

Achvaradsal Broch is, in area, one of the largest in Scotland with a court diameter of 9.8 metres. The interior of the broch was excavated during the latter part of the 19th century, but the external wall face was not cleared, and remains concealed beneath a sizable vegetated mound. The walling, which rises to 1.6 metres above the central court, is composed in the main of quite small slabs of light-coloured sandstone, giving an appearance rather like brickwork. Achvaradsal has a most impressive, quite narrow entrance passage, a little short of 4 metres long on its east-south-east.

At the time of my visit, the broch was besieged by a major infestation of Giant Hogweed. Even with a walking pole fully extended above me, I could not quite reach the hogweed's flowering heads, which must therefore have been at least 4 metres tall. Achvaradsal is one of the brochs promoted by the Caithness Boch Project, whom I contacted about the problem. They replied that they were aware of the situation and would be taking measures to tackle it. I'm pleased to report that, just three weeks later, I was sent a photograph showing that clearance work had begun. Hogweed, however, is not easy to erradicate, particularly if it has been seeding the area for years, so it may take several seasons to render the site hogweed-free.

You can read much more about Achvarasdal Broch on the Canore website, including details of finds from the site.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
11th August 2018ce
Edited 12th August 2018ce

Redcastle (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Made a few abortive attempts to reach this 8.5 - 9ft stone in the past by other routes - it is surrounded by farms and fields - the latter often with cattle in them. Finally got lucky yesterday using the road closest to the stone. Great weather and no cows in the four fields that have to be entered. Convenient tractor tracks through the new grass made walking easy. Take the minor road off the A711 about a mile outside Dalbeattie. Use OS explorer 313 and you will see Edingham Loch at the start of this road. About 2.6km up is the entrance to Townhead of Culloch farm on the right. Shortly after that on the left is a long passing-place with a field gate. Most of the passing places on this road are unusually long and it is certainly possible to park a small-med car at the end of this one without compromising the space or obstructing the field gate even for a tractor and trailer. Enter field and head up to the top right hand corner with a cattle trough. Enter field to the right via gate (it was open) and keeping to the left, head up alongside the fenced in track to the top of that field. Go through or over two more gates to get into the field beyond the stone wall. Follow the outside line of the farm buildings and the small wood which points across the field to the stone - just inside the next field. The wall in between is topped by barbed wire but a few yards along from the stone a section has collapsed and a field gate has been propped there with barbed wire along it. It is not hard to get over and back along to the stone. new abbey Posted by new abbey
10th August 2018ce
Edited 12th August 2018ce

D44 Westenesch (Hunebed)

The only special 'feature' of D44 Westenesch is the fact, that it is the only Hunebed in the Netherlands in private ownership. Apart from that, there are only a few remnants that should probably only be of interest to the Hunebed completionists among us.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
9th August 2018ce

D43 Schimeres (Hunebed)

D43 Emmen Schimmeres is a must see site, as it is the only long grave in The Netherlands. Normally long graves are more in common in Denmark and Germany, and indeed the Hunebed is more similar e.g. to Visbeker Bräutigam 3, Visbeker Braut and Glaner Braut 2 near Wildeshausen as to any other dutch Hunebed.

The long grave is 40.3 meters long and 6.8 meters wide, inside the 53 enclosing stones there are two burial chambers. The entrance to the northern burial chamber (4.6 x 3.0m) lay to the east, the entrance to the southern burial chamber (8.1 x 2.9m) lay to the west. The northern burial chamber originally had three capstones and six supporting stones, the southern burial chamber had five capstones and ten supporting stones.

Unfortunately, the Hunebed is currently heavily overgrown in some sections, but nevertheless a great place to visit.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
9th August 2018ce

The Borg (Broch)

June 5, 2017

Driving north through Strath Halladale, it is difficult to miss the huge bulk of The Borg looming above on your right, standing atop a mound 38 metres tall and about 200 metres distant. It is an impressive edifice built of large rounded boulders, many of which now form a mantle of tumble all around it.

Although much of the broch wall has degenerated into a field of tumbled blocks, there are still some sections where the structure endures, particularly so in the west where neat courses can be seen rising to a height of three metres. At the other extreme, to the north, the walling has all but disappeared, creating an opening into the central court.

The entrance passage, now largely blocked by debris, lies a little east of south, andcan be traced through the entire thickness of the broch wall, and most of its lintels remain in place.

The Borg is most certainly a worthwhile stop on the route north, not least because its elevated position affords splendid views along Strath Halladale.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
9th August 2018ce

Trantlemore (Broch)

Visited: June 25, 2018

Just 1½ kilometres north of The Borg, off the A897 as it passes through Strath Halladale, a minor road branches left across the Halladale River towards a walled cemetery. Trantlemore broch lies a kilometre farther on on the right-hand side of the road.

There is very little remaining to be seen, just a vegetated rise about a metre and a half tall in a field a few metres east of the road. On the southwest of the structure a section of vegetated wall can be recognised, but little else. There is no sign of an entrance passage.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
8th August 2018ce

D41 Emmermeer (Hunebed)

D41 Emmen-N lies right beside the road to Oddorn. It is a nice little and notably flat Hunebed, even the capstones are flat. It is the last discovered hunebed in Drenthe. It is a relatively complete preserved with four capstones, two endstones and eight supporting stones.

Due to the proximity of the road and the housing estates the atmosphere is a little bit disturbed.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
7th August 2018ce

Riereach Burn (Cairn(s))

From Barevan Bridge we headed east and took the first minor road heading south towards Glengeoullie, at which point the road ends. After asking permission we headed south on a decent track crossing the Riereach Burn at the Braevall Fords. With the water being so low this was an easy crossing. On another day.........................

Take the track to the west of burn, today it was a good time to look to the east of burn. Sandmartins, hundreds of them, flying about and taking advantage of the sandy banks.

After about another mile look east for a solitary stick on a bump or a solitary stone lying beside it. This is the cairn and I would think this could a pretty much undisturbed site. A kerb some fallen some standing still surrounds the cairn, difficult to spot but still there. The slab mentioned by Canmore is also still sitting in the middle of cairn. It still sits at 1m high being almost 9m wide. Beautiful views north to the Black Isle, east/west heather covered moors and to the south Carn A Mhais Leathain (the track ends up there).

However both Drew and dog were needing to head back, after a look around, to paddle our feet in the burn. We'd chosen the hottest day of the year to go hiking in open moor.

Thank goodness for hats!

Visited 18/7/2018.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th August 2018ce
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