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Showing 1-20 of 289 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20

Creswell Crags (Cave / Rock Shelter)

The gateway to hell? Hundreds of anti-witch marks found in Midlands cave


Medieval vandalism?

If there is a gateway to hell, a portal from the underworld used by demons and witches to wreak their evil havoc on humanity, then it could be in a small east Midlands cave handy for both the M1 and A60.

Heritage experts have revealed what is thought to be the biggest concentration of apotropaic marks, or symbols to ward off evil or misfortune, ever found in the UK.

The markings, at Creswell Crags, a limestone gorge on the Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border, include hundreds of letters, symbols and patterns carved, at a time when belief in witchcraft was widespread. The scale and variety of the marks made on the limestone walls and ceiling of a cave which has at its centre a deep, dark, hole, is unprecedented....

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2019/feb/15/nottinghamshire-cave-carvings-marks-scare-witches

Kirkheads (Round Barrow(s))

Ancient Carved 'Drums' Give Exact Stonehenge Measurements, Say Archaeologists


A set of highly decorated chalk cylinders, carved in Britain more than 4,000 years ago and known as the Folkton drums, could be ancient replicas of measuring devices used for laying out prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, archaeologists say...


https://www.livescience.com/64603-ancient-carved-drums-measure-stonehenge.html

Vespasian's Camp and Blick Mead (Hillfort)

Ancient platform 'damaged' during Stonehenge tunnel work


Archaeologists have accused Highways England of accidentally drilling a large hole through a 6,000-year-old structure near Stonehenge during preparatory work for a tunnel.

The drilling, which is alleged to have taken place at Blick Mead, around a mile and a half from the world-famous neolithic ring of stones, has enraged archaeologists, who say engineers have dug a three-metre-deep hole (10ft) through a man-made platform of flint and animal bone.

Highways England have said they are not aware of any damage to archaeological layers on the site caused by their work and will meet with the archaeological team on Thursday, led by David Jacques, a senior research fellow at the University of Buckingham.......



https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/dec/06/ancient-platform-damaged-during-stonehenge-tunnel-work

Pembrokeshire (County)

Pembrokeshire treasure hunter unearths Celtic chariot


A metal detectorist has found what is thought to be the first Celtic chariot burial to be uncovered in Wales.

The burial ritual was reserved for high-ranking chiefs who would be interred complete with their chariot, horses, tack and even weapons.

Mike Smith believes his find may point to a huge undiscovered Iron Age settlement nearby.

National Museum Wales describes the finds as "significant and exciting".

The actual location in south Pembrokeshire is being kept secret while archaeologists prepare for a major dig next year.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46294000

Orkney

Scotland’s oldest heritage sites at risk from rising seas


Off the north coast of Scotland, Orkney’s soft green landscapes hold a trove of things from everyday life before history was written.

More than 3,000 archaeological sites — among them standing stone circles, Norse halls and a Neolithic tomb graffitied by Vikings — have endured for millenniums, scattered across the roughly 70 islands that make up the Orkney archipelago.

At Skara Brae, one of Europe’s best-preserved Stone Age villages, kitchens built around 3180 BC are fitted with hearths and cupboards, bedsteads and doors that could be bolted shut.

Today, in forays to remote spits of land, people are working to save some of these places for posterity from the climate changes accelerated by human activity.

About half of Orkney’s 3,000 sites, many built before Stonehenge or the pyramids, are under threat from those changes, according to the county archaeologist. Some are already being washed away.

Since 1970, Orkney beaches have eroded twice as fast as in the previous century. Others that had been stable are now shrinking. Rains, falling heavier and more often, are dissolving the crusts of soil and sand packs that protect remnants of civilizations.



https://www.sbs.com.au/news/scotland-s-oldest-heritage-sites-at-risk-from-rising-seas

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch)

Archaeologists Find 2,000-Year-Old Wooden Bowl, plus hair


The Iron Age artifacts were sealed in a subterranean chamber of the Cairns Broch, a tower-like stone structure.
uring the Iron Age, the Cairns Broch—a tower-like stone building of monumental proportions—dominated the landscape of Windwick Bay, a rocky cove in the Scottish archipelago of Orkney. Equal parts house, fort and status symbol, the broch stood at the center of an ancient settlement until some point between the later 1st and mid-2nd century A.D., when it was sealed and subsequently abandoned.


Read more:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/archaeologists-find-2000-year-old-wooden-bowl-strands-hair-northern-scotland-180969713/

And also, if you can get through the adverts at the Independent, there is this with a video...

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/2000-year-old-bowl-underground-chamber-orkney-scotland-archaeology-a8447421.html

Devon

Prehistoric stone hunt under way in Devon salt marsh


A team of archaeologists is braving horse flies, spiky vegetation and murky ditches to hunt for mysterious standing stones lost beneath a West Country salt marsh.

The Yelland stone row at Isley Marsh disappeared beneath a thick blanket of silt after the closure of a power station changed the flow of sediment in the Taw and Torridge estuary in north Devon in the 1980s.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/27/prehistoric-stone-hunt-under-way-in-devon-salt-marsh

Highland (Mainland)

Prehistoric roundhouse excavated at Tore near Inverness


The remains of an ancient roundhouse have been uncovered by archaeologists in the Highlands.

The prehistoric property was excavated ahead of the construction of a new business park at Mullan's Wood at Tore, near Inverness.

Archaeologists said the roundhouse may have been built in the Iron Age 2,000 years ago, or earlier.

The excavation area has been reinstated and the site will be protected during the future building work.

Environmental samples taken during the fieldwork has the potential to provide material for dating the site.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-44398322

Dun Deardail (Stone Fort / Dun)

Ash from destructive hill fort fire 'preserved in peat'


Archaeologists believe they have found, preserved in peat, charcoal from a fire that destroyed an ancient hillfort.

Dun Deardail was built about 2,500 years ago on a prominent knoll on Sgorr Chalum, a hill overlooking the River Nevis in Glen Nevis.

Charcoal found in surrounding peatbog has been analysed.

Four "significant fire events" were identified as layers of charcoal or soot. One, from around 310BC, is thought to be the fort's burning.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-43813824

Rousay

Archaeologists search for answers in 'Egypt of the North'


A TEAM of international archaeologists hope to answer questions remaining about an Orkney island known as "the Egypt of the north".

The experts have started the largest geophysics survey to date on Rousay, a hilly island off Orkney Mainland.....................



http://www.thenational.scot/news/16171515.Archaeologists_search_for_answers_in__Egypt_of_the_North_/

Ramsey Island

Ramsey Island: New survey finds 'Bronze Age' site


The laser scan of Ramsey Island uncovered a "hidden" landscape thought to date back to the Bronze Age.

The survey, taken from the air, has also seen a detailed 3D model of the two mile-long beauty spot made for the first time.

Experts say the data could also be used to see if climate change affects the environment on the island.

Royal Commission archaeologist Dan Hunt described the findings as "incredible".

He added: "It has presented us with a stunning view of the island in enormous detail."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-43534578

Lewis and Harris

Housebuilder uncovers Iron Age chamber on Lewis


A 2,000-year-old underground chamber has been uncovered during work to build a house on the Isle of Lewis.

The Iron Age souterrain was revealed during the digging of the foundations for the property in Ness.

Local archaeologists, husband and wife team Chris and Rachel Barrowman, are recording the souterrain.

Dr Barrowman said theories on the purpose of the stone-lined, flat stone-roofed structures included storing food.

continued...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42988416

Stonehenge and its Environs

Archaeologists may have found architects' camp for Stonehenge


A team of archaeologists believe they may have discovered a spot where some of the architects of Stonehenge gathered and camped.

The team have been investigating a causewayed enclosure – these are thought to be ancient meeting places or centres of trade – on army land at Larkhill close to Stonehenge.

They found an alignment of posts that matches the orientation of the circle at Stonehenge, leading to the theory that Larkhill could have been some sort of blueprint for the temple.

Si Cleggett, of Wessex Archaeology, conceded it was possible to suggest that any evidence of prehistoric settlement could be connected to the creation of Stonehenge.


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/02/archaeologists-architects-camp-stonehenge-larkhill

North Yorkshire

Ancient lake reveals a colorful past


Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' - possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying colour to their animal skins or for artwork.

The ochre crayon was discovered near an ancient lake, now blanketed in peat, near Scarborough, North Yorkshire. An ochre pebble was found at another site on the opposite side of the lake.


https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/uoy-alr012618.php

Worlebury (Hillfort)

Hill fort brambles to be removed to reveal archaeology for the first time since 1824


The fort, in Worlebury Woods, suffered from vandalism and was classified as being ‘at risk’ by Historic England at the end of 2016.

North Somerset Council has received a £10,000 grant to pay for surveys at the site to see what work needs to be done to preserve it.

The volunteers of Worlebury Hill Fort Group have started to introduce limestone grassland to the area known as the glade.


http://www.thewestonmercury.co.uk/news/worlebury-hill-fort-group-to-remove-brambles-to-uncover-archaeology-1-5353052

East Riding of Yorkshire

Ancient henge discovered in Yorkshire


THOUSANDS of years ago it would have stood proud on the horizon, a striking monument which could be seen for miles. The circular monument lay hidden for centuries under farmland, its existence only hinted at in crop marks, spotted in aerial surveys.

Read more at: https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/ancient-henge-discovered-in-yorkshire-1-8930717

Moel Arthur (Hillfort)

Mysterious Stone Tools Unearthed at Bronze-Age Site in Wales


Amateur archaeologists excavating a Bronze Age site in the United Kingdom have discovered a cache of unusual stone tools unlike any that have been found before.

The tools appear to have been deposited deliberately — perhaps ceremonially — in what would have been a stream around 4,500 years ago, according to the researchers.


https://www.livescience.com/60606-stone-tools-unearthed-at-bronze-age-site.html

Thanks to Stone Pages for this information.

Jersey

Archaeologists find Stones of interest


A COLLECTION of stones has been unearthed by a team of UK archaeologists investigating fields in St Clement earmarked for a new estate of 200 affordable homes.
Five stones, which could date back to the Island’s neolithic past when the dolmens were built, were discovered by a team from the Museum of London Archaeological Services at the former Samarès Nursery site.

Read more at..

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/10/18/archaeologists-find-stones-of-interest-on-estate-site/#5rD5GMXgMU4tVElq.99

Stonehenge and its Environs

New Stonehenge path open – at last 9 October 2017 |


For those who like to walk and cycle and it's free...


The new Permissive Path at Stonehenge is finally open after a three-year delay waiting for the grass to grow strong enough to bear the weight of a few cyclists and pedestrians.
A group of pedestrians and cyclists from surrounding villages joined together to mark the re-opening of the route, accompanied by former Wiltshire councillor Ian West. He campaigned strongly against English Heritage for the path to be re-opened as specified in a planning agreement.
The right of way passes within a few feet of the Heal Stone and gives free access to the public. The path allows the public to use the old A344 road and the new path from Airman’s Corner roundabout to the A303 free of charge and without any passes.
“It allows you to take some beautiful photographs without having to have a local residents’ pass and then booking your appointment time along with other tourists,” said a jubilant Mr West. “The path opens up the old connection between Shrewton and West Amesbury, if you are brave enough to cross the A303, although the authorities deem it to be a safe crossing,” he added.
Horses are not permitted on the new path, which is part of the old road now grassed over, but they can go from the roundabout to By-Way 12, which passes close to the stones, to Larkhill in one direction and Druids Lodge in the other, free of charge and without passes. This opens up the access to the by-way and allows travel in both directions on horseback.



http://www.yourvalleynews.co.uk/frontpage-news/new-stonehenge-path-open-last/

Stowe's Pound (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Stowe's Pound fairy stack creators 'are historic vandals'


Visitors to a 6,000-year-old site who are removing stones and piling them up to be "artistic" could be causing significant damage, experts say.
Stones from Stowe's Pound on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, are being used to build the "fairy stacks" by people "probably unaware" they are breaking the law.
The stacks have been described as "historic vandalism".
The practice at the Scheduled Ancient Monument site has also been condemned by Historic England.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-41245644
Showing 1-20 of 289 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20
"I once blew a blast into the Blowing Stone, which rolled a hollow wave of sepulchral sound into the hills. The megalith builders, taking their lesson from the conch-shells of the Eastern Mediterranean, blew into this very stone to summon the gods or, more probably, the goddess of the high places. Another two miles and there is the goddess herself or rather, the celtic descendant of the goddess, stretched in white and in flight across the bald brow of Uffington Hill. The downs lift to 800 feet and by their very godliness of combe and crescent, of jutting ness and plunging spur, ordain the tie beam of White Horse Hill to be one more of the holy places of the chalk. So it was on Windover Hill.... and so it is here where the Celtic town of Uffington is flanked by the galloping horse and a Neolithic workshop on the one side, and the chambered long barrow of Wayland's Smithy with its grove of beeches on the other.".......

H.J.Massingham - English Downland


http://northstoke.blogspot.co.uk/

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