The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Northern Ireland — News

Sligo’s Neolithic tombs are being vandalised ‘on scale never seen before’


Five-thousand-year-old Neolithic tombs in Co Sligo are suffering damage and vandalism “on a scale never seen before” and will not survive unless action is taken immediately, archaeological experts have warned.

There are 75 passage tombs in Co Sligo, almost one-third of the estimated 240 in the State, according to the Sligo Neolithic Landscapes Group, which is pressing for the county’s Neolithic heritage to be deemed a World Heritage Site by Unesco.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/sligo-s-neolithic-tombs-are-being-vandalised-on-scale-never-seen-before-1.4310914

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Stonehenge: Neolithic monument found near sacred site


Archaeologists have discovered a ring of prehistoric shafts, dug thousands of years ago near Stonehenge.

Fieldwork has revealed evidence of a 1.2 mile (2km) wide circle of large shafts measuring more than 10m in diameter and 5m in depth.

They surround the ancient settlement of Durrington Walls, two miles (3km) from Stonehenge.

Tests suggest the ground works are Neolithic and were excavated more than 4,500 years ago.

Experts believe the 20 or more shafts may have served as a boundary to a sacred area connected to the henge.

A team of academics from the universities of St Andrews, Birmingham, Warwick, Glasgow and the University of Wales Trinity Saint David worked on the project

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-53132567

https://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue55/4/index.html

Doll Tor (Stone Circle) — News

Ancient Peak District stone circle damaged by campfires


"Serious" damage to a scheduled ancient monument in Derbyshire is being investigated by police.

The prehistoric Doll Tor stone circle, near Birchover in the Peak District, was targeted some time in the past few days.

Sam Grimshaw, who discovered the damage, said he was "very angry" when he found some smaller stones had been moved and several fires had been set.

Historic England has appealed to anyone with information to contact police.

Mr Grimshaw said he found stones had been moved to build a fire pit and for a seat, while other fires had been set.............

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-derbyshire-52853799

Uffington White Horse (Hill Figure) — Links

Against all odds, England's massive chalk horse has survived for 3000 years


Old Article (July 2017)

Gloucestershire — News

Unearthed Ancient British chieftain and probable shaman reveal secrets about old burial rituals


The once monumental final resting place of a probable prehistoric chieftain and, potentially, his shaman has been discovered in southwest England.

It’s one of the most fascinating archaeological discoveries in southern Britain in recent years. Significantly, the duo formed part of a remarkable social and political process which changed human history – and still shapes our world today.

The probable chieftain or prestigious leader – a man in his thirties or forties – had been interred underneath the centre of a large funerary mound which had been constructed specifically for him inside his own personal 20m diameter ditched enclosure.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/archaeology-anicent-british-chieftain-shaman-burial-ritual-a9480321.html

Note: It would be interesting to pinpoint this site near a confluence of four rivers..

Rough Tor long cairn — Miscellaneous

Interesting pathways? Standing Stone's Michael Botts ruminations on the long cairn.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzavAuy9UlQ

Central London — Links

The Urban Prehistorian


Interesting observations on the work of sculptor Keir Smith.

Airigh Na Beinne Bige (Stone Circle) — News

Lewis stone circle has star-shaped lightning strike


Evidence of a "massive" lightning strike has been found at the centre of a stone circle in the Western Isles.

A single large strike, or many smaller ones on the same spot, left a star-shaped magnetic anomaly at the 4,000-year-old site in Lewis.

Scientists made the discovery at Site XI or Airigh na Beinne Bige, a hillside stone circle now consisting of a single standing stone.

The site is at the famous Calanais Standing Stones.

Scientists said the lightning strike, which was indentified in a geophysics survey, could show a potential link between the construction of ancient stone circles and the forces of nature.

They said the lightning struck some time before peat enveloped the stone circle at Site XI 3,000 years ago. The discovery is detailed in new research published online.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-50891787

East Yorkshire — News

Iron Age shield found in Pocklington


The remarkably well preserved bronze shield, with a swirling pattern design, formed part of a unique chariot burial, which also contained the upright skeletons of two ponies found on a building site at Pocklington in 2018.

Its owner, a highly regarded member of his community, was in his late 40s or older when he died, between 320BC to 174BC.

He was given a spectacular send-off, with his body placed in the chariot behind the horses, placed to look as if they were leaping out of the grave.


https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/heritage/iron-age-shield-found-in-pocklington-is-one-of-most-important-ancient-finds-this-millennium-1-10137418

Old Oswestry (Hillfort) — News

Television historian speak out for Oswestry hillfort


Historian and television presenter, Professor Michael Wood, has expressed serious concern over plans to build houses within the historic landscape of Old Oswestry hillfort.

....................................

In a letter of objection he wrote: "I have followed with concern the proposed developments. The Iron Age hillfort of Old Oswestry is generally agreed to be the finest site of its kind in the Welsh Borders. Any development that threatens its setting, as this self-evidently does, in my view, therefore, should be refused.”

The popular historian said Oswestry’s northern gateway around the hillfort was an extraordinarily interesting - and rare - example of a medieval sacred landscape, which still awaited detailed research and survey. This, he said was is in addition to the area’s multi-phase heritage interest ranging from pre-Iron Age to WW1 military archaeology.

https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/local-hubs/oswestry/2019/07/30/television-historian-speak-out-for-oswestry-hillfort/

Ness of Brodgar (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — News

'Stunning' decorated Neolithic stone discovered in Orkney


Archaeologists have uncovered what they describe as a "stunning example" of Neolithic decorate stone in Orkney.

The notch-marked slab was discovered at Ness of Brodgar, the location of a well-preserved and sophisticated complex of stone buildings.

The site was built and occupied by people more than 5,000 years ago.

Archaeological excavations began at Ness of Brodgar more than 15 years ago and the site covers an area of about six acres (2.5 ha)....



https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-49030379

http://www.nessofbrodgar.co.uk/

Mither Tap (Hillfort) — News

Steps to ancient hillfort well in Aberdeenshire uncovered


Archaeologists have revealed the steps to an ancient hillfort's well in Aberdeenshire.

The site on Mither Tap, a summit on Bennachie, a hill near Inverurie, was first recorded in the 1800s before being covered over.

University of Aberdeen's Northern Picts project said its excavation meant the steps could been seen for the first time in more than 200 years.

Archaeologists believe the steps could be 1,000 years old,




https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-48675964

Cantre'r Gwaelod (Mesolithic site) — News

Mythical ' Sunken Kingdom' of Wales rises again


A prehistoric forest which was buried under water and sand more than 4,500 years ago and inspired a local legend has been uncovered on a Welsh beach.

The forest near the village of Borth, Ceredigion, Mid Wales, used to stretch for up to three miles along the shore between Ynys-las and Borth but eventually was buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater.

The eerie remains of these ancient trees under Borth's beach have led to the local legend of the mythical Sunken Kingdom of Wales, called Cantre'r Gwaelod.

Folklore has it that Cantre’r Gwaelod, or the Sunken Hundred, was a once-fertile land and township stretching for 20 miles, but was lost beneath the waves in a mythical age.

According to tales passed down through the ages, disaster struck and Cantre’r Gwaelod was lost to floods when Mererid, the priestess of a fairy well, apparently neglected her duties and allowed the well to overflow. Some say that on a quiet day, they can hear the bells of the drowned church of Cantre’r Gwaelod.

Now the remains of the forest's trees have been exposed more clearly than ever by low tides and high winds from Storm Hannah.











https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7057361/Petrified-forest-Bronze-Age-emerged-Welsh-beach.html

Stonehenge (Circle henge) — News

Missing part of Stonehenge returned 60 years on


A metre-long core from inside the prehistoric stone was removed during archaeological excavations in 1958.

No one knew where it was until Robert Phillips, 89, who was involved in those works, decided to return it.

English Heritage, which looks after Stonehenge, hopes the sample might now help establish where the stones originally came from.

In 1958 archaeologists raised an entire fallen trilithon - a set of three large stones, consisting of two that would have stood upright with the third placed horizontally across the top.

During the works, cracks were found in one of the vertical stones and in order to reinforce it, cores were drilled through the stone and metal rods inserted.



https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-48190588

The Fairy Knowe (Chambered Cairn) — News

Neolithic dog reveals tales behind Orkney's monuments


The head of a dog that lived on Orkney 4,500 years ago has been recreated in what experts believe is the world’s first canine forensic reconstruction.

The dog had been domesticated in the Neolithic era on the Scottish island archipelago, but still carried wolf-like characteristics, standing about the size of a large collie, according to Historic Environment Scotland (HES) which jointly commissioned the reconstruction with the National Museum of Scotland.

It was reconstructed by a forensic artist – using techniques similar to those by crime scene investigators – from one of 24 dog skulls that were excavated by archaeologists in Cuween Hill, a delicate passage tomb on Orkney’s Mainland, and which have been radiocarbon-dated to 2,500BC.


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/apr/13/neolithic-dog-reveals-tales-behind-orkney-monuments

Herd Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Links

The Smell of Water


A description of this area - Garrick Moor

Creswell Crags (Cave / Rock Shelter) — News

The gateway to hell? Hundreds of anti-witch marks found in Midlands cave


Medieval vandalism?

If there is a gateway to hell, a portal from the underworld used by demons and witches to wreak their evil havoc on humanity, then it could be in a small east Midlands cave handy for both the M1 and A60.

Heritage experts have revealed what is thought to be the biggest concentration of apotropaic marks, or symbols to ward off evil or misfortune, ever found in the UK.

The markings, at Creswell Crags, a limestone gorge on the Nottinghamshire/Derbyshire border, include hundreds of letters, symbols and patterns carved, at a time when belief in witchcraft was widespread. The scale and variety of the marks made on the limestone walls and ceiling of a cave which has at its centre a deep, dark, hole, is unprecedented....

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2019/feb/15/nottinghamshire-cave-carvings-marks-scare-witches

Kirkheads (Round Barrow(s)) — News

Ancient Carved 'Drums' Give Exact Stonehenge Measurements, Say Archaeologists


A set of highly decorated chalk cylinders, carved in Britain more than 4,000 years ago and known as the Folkton drums, could be ancient replicas of measuring devices used for laying out prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, archaeologists say...


https://www.livescience.com/64603-ancient-carved-drums-measure-stonehenge.html

Vespasian's Camp and Blick Mead (Hillfort) — News

Ancient platform 'damaged' during Stonehenge tunnel work


Archaeologists have accused Highways England of accidentally drilling a large hole through a 6,000-year-old structure near Stonehenge during preparatory work for a tunnel.

The drilling, which is alleged to have taken place at Blick Mead, around a mile and a half from the world-famous neolithic ring of stones, has enraged archaeologists, who say engineers have dug a three-metre-deep hole (10ft) through a man-made platform of flint and animal bone.

Highways England have said they are not aware of any damage to archaeological layers on the site caused by their work and will meet with the archaeological team on Thursday, led by David Jacques, a senior research fellow at the University of Buckingham.......



https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/dec/06/ancient-platform-damaged-during-stonehenge-tunnel-work

Wemyss Caves - The Court Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Links

The ancient symbols hidden in a cave


Latest news on the protection of these caves.

Pembrokeshire (County) — News

Pembrokeshire treasure hunter unearths Celtic chariot


A metal detectorist has found what is thought to be the first Celtic chariot burial to be uncovered in Wales.

The burial ritual was reserved for high-ranking chiefs who would be interred complete with their chariot, horses, tack and even weapons.

Mike Smith believes his find may point to a huge undiscovered Iron Age settlement nearby.

National Museum Wales describes the finds as "significant and exciting".

The actual location in south Pembrokeshire is being kept secret while archaeologists prepare for a major dig next year.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46294000

Orkney — News

Scotland’s oldest heritage sites at risk from rising seas


Off the north coast of Scotland, Orkney’s soft green landscapes hold a trove of things from everyday life before history was written.

More than 3,000 archaeological sites — among them standing stone circles, Norse halls and a Neolithic tomb graffitied by Vikings — have endured for millenniums, scattered across the roughly 70 islands that make up the Orkney archipelago.

At Skara Brae, one of Europe’s best-preserved Stone Age villages, kitchens built around 3180 BC are fitted with hearths and cupboards, bedsteads and doors that could be bolted shut.

Today, in forays to remote spits of land, people are working to save some of these places for posterity from the climate changes accelerated by human activity.

About half of Orkney’s 3,000 sites, many built before Stonehenge or the pyramids, are under threat from those changes, according to the county archaeologist. Some are already being washed away.

Since 1970, Orkney beaches have eroded twice as fast as in the previous century. Others that had been stable are now shrinking. Rains, falling heavier and more often, are dissolving the crusts of soil and sand packs that protect remnants of civilizations.



https://www.sbs.com.au/news/scotland-s-oldest-heritage-sites-at-risk-from-rising-seas

St David's Head Camp (Cliff Fort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>St David's Head Camp</b>Posted by moss

Cairns O' The Bu (Broch) — News

Archaeologists Find 2,000-Year-Old Wooden Bowl, plus hair


The Iron Age artifacts were sealed in a subterranean chamber of the Cairns Broch, a tower-like stone structure.
uring the Iron Age, the Cairns Broch—a tower-like stone building of monumental proportions—dominated the landscape of Windwick Bay, a rocky cove in the Scottish archipelago of Orkney. Equal parts house, fort and status symbol, the broch stood at the center of an ancient settlement until some point between the later 1st and mid-2nd century A.D., when it was sealed and subsequently abandoned.


Read more:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/archaeologists-find-2000-year-old-wooden-bowl-strands-hair-northern-scotland-180969713/

And also, if you can get through the adverts at the Independent, there is this with a video...

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/2000-year-old-bowl-underground-chamber-orkney-scotland-archaeology-a8447421.html

Devon — News

Prehistoric stone hunt under way in Devon salt marsh


A team of archaeologists is braving horse flies, spiky vegetation and murky ditches to hunt for mysterious standing stones lost beneath a West Country salt marsh.

The Yelland stone row at Isley Marsh disappeared beneath a thick blanket of silt after the closure of a power station changed the flow of sediment in the Taw and Torridge estuary in north Devon in the 1980s.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jun/27/prehistoric-stone-hunt-under-way-in-devon-salt-marsh

Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

We took this trip because Littlestone wanted to take some books down to the Samye Linge Tibetan Monastery. I checked for what was in the area as far stone circles were concerned and came up with the Girdle/Loupin stone circles. We stayed at Marilyn’s Motel in Eskdalemuir which consisted of two wooden buildings decorated in Tibetan style and very comfortable, though we were slightly squashed in the smaller building. Samye Ling was a mile and a half down the road, and a place to visit just for the joyous (and slightly over decorated temple) and also a vision of ‘wedding cake’ stupas.

The landscape of hills, valleys and rivers is marred to a certain degree by industrialised forestry and yet the beauty of it all is captured as one drives along the lanes round here. The stone circles are easy enough to get to (and only about a mile from Marilyn’s) that is if you do not have a weak ankle! But glorious when you do get to them. Situated close to the White Esk river which burbles quietly over a shallow bed. This river in fact took the other half of the Girdle Stanes as it moved over the landscape through the centuries.

The story is that perhaps half the Girdle Stanes were taken by the river after which the Loupin Stanes were erected, there is supposedly a stone row joining the two circles, rather uneven, but it could also be interpreted as station stones along the way.

We are going back to this area, the Girdle stone circle is very serene.

As a matter of interest there is a prehistoric trail to take; three Iron Age forts to climb, and of course the circles and a settlement. Castle O'er looks good.

http://www.langholmwalks.co.uk/pht/sitelist.html


A Victorian interpretation!
https://archive.org/stream/langholmasitwashhysl#page/n37/mode/2up

Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes</b>Posted by moss<b>Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes</b>Posted by moss<b>Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes</b>Posted by moss<b>Girdle Stanes & Loupin Stanes</b>Posted by moss

Highland (Mainland) — News

Prehistoric roundhouse excavated at Tore near Inverness


The remains of an ancient roundhouse have been uncovered by archaeologists in the Highlands.

The prehistoric property was excavated ahead of the construction of a new business park at Mullan's Wood at Tore, near Inverness.

Archaeologists said the roundhouse may have been built in the Iron Age 2,000 years ago, or earlier.

The excavation area has been reinstated and the site will be protected during the future building work.

Environmental samples taken during the fieldwork has the potential to provide material for dating the site.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-44398322

Dun Deardail (Stone Fort / Dun) — News

Ash from destructive hill fort fire 'preserved in peat'


Archaeologists believe they have found, preserved in peat, charcoal from a fire that destroyed an ancient hillfort.

Dun Deardail was built about 2,500 years ago on a prominent knoll on Sgorr Chalum, a hill overlooking the River Nevis in Glen Nevis.

Charcoal found in surrounding peatbog has been analysed.

Four "significant fire events" were identified as layers of charcoal or soot. One, from around 310BC, is thought to be the fort's burning.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-43813824

Rousay — News

Archaeologists search for answers in 'Egypt of the North'


A TEAM of international archaeologists hope to answer questions remaining about an Orkney island known as "the Egypt of the north".

The experts have started the largest geophysics survey to date on Rousay, a hilly island off Orkney Mainland.....................



http://www.thenational.scot/news/16171515.Archaeologists_search_for_answers_in__Egypt_of_the_North_/

Barclodiad-y-Gawres (Chambered Cairn) — Links

Archaeologists revealing never-before-seen secrets of prehistoric burial chamber


News courtesy of 'Standing with Stones' website.

Ramsey Island — News

Ramsey Island: New survey finds 'Bronze Age' site


The laser scan of Ramsey Island uncovered a "hidden" landscape thought to date back to the Bronze Age.

The survey, taken from the air, has also seen a detailed 3D model of the two mile-long beauty spot made for the first time.

Experts say the data could also be used to see if climate change affects the environment on the island.

Royal Commission archaeologist Dan Hunt described the findings as "incredible".

He added: "It has presented us with a stunning view of the island in enormous detail."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-43534578

Lewis and Harris — News

Housebuilder uncovers Iron Age chamber on Lewis


A 2,000-year-old underground chamber has been uncovered during work to build a house on the Isle of Lewis.

The Iron Age souterrain was revealed during the digging of the foundations for the property in Ness.

Local archaeologists, husband and wife team Chris and Rachel Barrowman, are recording the souterrain.

Dr Barrowman said theories on the purpose of the stone-lined, flat stone-roofed structures included storing food.

continued...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42988416

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Archaeologists may have found architects' camp for Stonehenge


A team of archaeologists believe they may have discovered a spot where some of the architects of Stonehenge gathered and camped.

The team have been investigating a causewayed enclosure – these are thought to be ancient meeting places or centres of trade – on army land at Larkhill close to Stonehenge.

They found an alignment of posts that matches the orientation of the circle at Stonehenge, leading to the theory that Larkhill could have been some sort of blueprint for the temple.

Si Cleggett, of Wessex Archaeology, conceded it was possible to suggest that any evidence of prehistoric settlement could be connected to the creation of Stonehenge.


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/02/archaeologists-architects-camp-stonehenge-larkhill

Twyn y Parc (Promontory Fort) — Links

Coflein


'A later Prehistoric style fort formed by strong ramparts cut across the narrow neck of a long and straggling cliff-girt promontory.'

North Yorkshire — News

Ancient lake reveals a colorful past


Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' - possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying colour to their animal skins or for artwork.

The ochre crayon was discovered near an ancient lake, now blanketed in peat, near Scarborough, North Yorkshire. An ochre pebble was found at another site on the opposite side of the lake.


https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/uoy-alr012618.php

Worlebury (Hillfort) — News

Hill fort brambles to be removed to reveal archaeology for the first time since 1824


The fort, in Worlebury Woods, suffered from vandalism and was classified as being ‘at risk’ by Historic England at the end of 2016.

North Somerset Council has received a £10,000 grant to pay for surveys at the site to see what work needs to be done to preserve it.

The volunteers of Worlebury Hill Fort Group have started to introduce limestone grassland to the area known as the glade.


http://www.thewestonmercury.co.uk/news/worlebury-hill-fort-group-to-remove-brambles-to-uncover-archaeology-1-5353052

Cornwall — Links

The Threat to Cornwall's Heritage by Elizabeth Dale


Cornwall is blessed with a long and fascinating history. Although visitors are often drawn to the county by the so called ‘Poldark effect’ many more are also seeking out our enigmatic prehistoric monuments. Elizabeth Dale investigates the hidden threat to this precious heritage.

East Yorkshire — News

Ancient henge discovered in Yorkshire


THOUSANDS of years ago it would have stood proud on the horizon, a striking monument which could be seen for miles. The circular monument lay hidden for centuries under farmland, its existence only hinted at in crop marks, spotted in aerial surveys.

Read more at: https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/ancient-henge-discovered-in-yorkshire-1-8930717

Moel Arthur (Hillfort) — News

Mysterious Stone Tools Unearthed at Bronze-Age Site in Wales


Amateur archaeologists excavating a Bronze Age site in the United Kingdom have discovered a cache of unusual stone tools unlike any that have been found before.

The tools appear to have been deposited deliberately — perhaps ceremonially — in what would have been a stream around 4,500 years ago, according to the researchers.


https://www.livescience.com/60606-stone-tools-unearthed-at-bronze-age-site.html

Thanks to Stone Pages for this information.

Emblance Downs (Stone Circle) — Links

Emblance Downs Twin Circles


Earlier this year the TimeSeekers volunteer clearance group highlighted three or four stone circles on Bodmin Moor that could benefit from a vegetation clearance and general tidy up. The twin circles on Emblance Downs were two such circles, so, after gaining the necessary approval from the Landowner, Natural England and Historic England, we were set to commence our work on the 21st August.

Jersey — News

Archaeologists find Stones of interest


A COLLECTION of stones has been unearthed by a team of UK archaeologists investigating fields in St Clement earmarked for a new estate of 200 affordable homes.
Five stones, which could date back to the Island’s neolithic past when the dolmens were built, were discovered by a team from the Museum of London Archaeological Services at the former Samarès Nursery site.

Read more at..

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/10/18/archaeologists-find-stones-of-interest-on-estate-site/#5rD5GMXgMU4tVElq.99

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

New Stonehenge path open – at last 9 October 2017 |


For those who like to walk and cycle and it's free...


The new Permissive Path at Stonehenge is finally open after a three-year delay waiting for the grass to grow strong enough to bear the weight of a few cyclists and pedestrians.
A group of pedestrians and cyclists from surrounding villages joined together to mark the re-opening of the route, accompanied by former Wiltshire councillor Ian West. He campaigned strongly against English Heritage for the path to be re-opened as specified in a planning agreement.
The right of way passes within a few feet of the Heal Stone and gives free access to the public. The path allows the public to use the old A344 road and the new path from Airman’s Corner roundabout to the A303 free of charge and without any passes.
“It allows you to take some beautiful photographs without having to have a local residents’ pass and then booking your appointment time along with other tourists,” said a jubilant Mr West. “The path opens up the old connection between Shrewton and West Amesbury, if you are brave enough to cross the A303, although the authorities deem it to be a safe crossing,” he added.
Horses are not permitted on the new path, which is part of the old road now grassed over, but they can go from the roundabout to By-Way 12, which passes close to the stones, to Larkhill in one direction and Druids Lodge in the other, free of charge and without passes. This opens up the access to the by-way and allows travel in both directions on horseback.



http://www.yourvalleynews.co.uk/frontpage-news/new-stonehenge-path-open-last/

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Cursuses relating to the Rudston Monolith


The Rudston cursus group consists of four cursuses stretching along the bottom and sides of the Great Wold Valley. At least one end of each of the monument are to be found on the elevated chalk ridges which surround Rudston. The valley contains the Gypsey Race, one of the rare streams across the chalklands, and two of the cursuses (A and C) cross this stream. The Rudston group contains an unparalleled concentration of cursus monuments. Cursus A is the southern most of the group. The southern end of the cursus survives as an earthwork and the remainder is visible on air photographs as two parallel ditches. The cursus is 2700 metres long by circa 58 metres, it tapers to 41 metres at the south terminal. Cursus A is the only one of the group where both ends are visible, both of the terminals are square in plan. The earthwork was excavated in the mid 19th century by Greenwell and showed what appeared to be a round barrow raised upon the surface of a long mound. This excavation produced six burials (two with Beakers), only one of which Greenwell considered to be primary, and a considerable amount of pottery. These burials were inserted into the south end of the cursus monument in the early bronze age. Greenwell also found sherds of earlier Neolithic pottery, along with worked flint and animal bones on the ground surface beneath the bank of the cursus. A second excavation across the west ditch in 1958 recovered 24 small pieces of Beaker pottery from the bottom 18 inches of the ditch fill, excluding the primary fill, and 4 larger pieces from the primary fill. There is evidence to suggest that the ditch was recut at this point explaining the presence of the later pottery.

Stowe's Pound (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — News

Stowe's Pound fairy stack creators 'are historic vandals'


Visitors to a 6,000-year-old site who are removing stones and piling them up to be "artistic" could be causing significant damage, experts say.
Stones from Stowe's Pound on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, are being used to build the "fairy stacks" by people "probably unaware" they are breaking the law.
The stacks have been described as "historic vandalism".
The practice at the Scheduled Ancient Monument site has also been condemned by Historic England.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-41245644

Duloe (Stone Circle) — Miscellaneous

If you are interested in wells, then just before you get to the village of Duloe, take the right hand lane (to Herodsfoot) from St.Keyne, and along that lane you will come on a very pretty moss and fern laden well of St.Keyne's. Robert Southey's poem will explain the consequences of getting married should you drink from the well.

http://www.poetryatlas.com/poetry/poem/1013/the-well-of-st-keyne.html

Cheddar Gorge and Gough's Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — News

Prehistoric Britons ate their dead and carved mysterious markings on their bones


Cheddar Gorge in Somerset’s Mendip Hills is one of Britain’s most beautiful natural wonders, with its sweeping limestone cliffs, and striking natural rock chambers.

But new evidence suggests the picturesque site had a deeply sinister past.

Paleontologists have discovered that around 15,000 years ago, British cave dwellers filleted and ate their dead relatives before inscribing markings on their bones in grisly prehistoric rituals.

It is the first time that such practices have been found in the Paleolithic, or Old Stone Age - which dates from 2.6 million years ago to around 12,000BC - anywhere in the world.




http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/08/09/ancient-britons-ate-dead-carved-mysterious-markings-bones/
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