The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Gnarrenburg (Chambered Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Ostereistedt (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

Ostereistedt is an approximately northeast-southwest-oriented megalithic tomb whose comparatively long and thereby narrow chamber originally had probably seven capstones. Only two of them have been preserved, both of them no longer in their original position. A capstone lies rolled on the northeastern end of the chamber, a second has fallen into the chamber. From the chamber are still four supporting stones of the northwest and five of the southeast long side and the northeast capstone preserved in situ. The entrance was in the middle of the southeastern long side. Around the chamber are some stones that are probably remnants of a destroyed enclosure.

The tomb is difficult to find, even with a GPS device. Drive on the L122 from Ostereistedt towards Rhadereistedt. Before you leave the village turn left in the Bahnhofstraße. Drive through Wennebostel and cross a railway line. I parked approximately 360 m after crossing the railway line (N53° 17' 31.0" E9° 09' 29.3"), where a forest track leads to the right. From here, the tomb is about 450m northwest as the crow flies. So first take this forest track for about 200 m, before reaching a slightly overgrown path that leads in a slight arc to the northwest. After about 300 m you should see the tomb in the wood.

Visited May 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Remains of a megalithic tomb from the Neolithic (approx. 2,250 BC)

Originally thick boulders lay as capstones over the burial chamber. A dry masonry of broken granite stones filled all the gaps. A layer of clay and mounds covered the grounds. On the south side a passage led into the tomb.

The stone tombs are tombs of the first peasant population. At the same time the cultivation of various cereals, other crops and livestock begins. Also larger stone axes were made, which enabled the felling of trees for large houses. Excavated floor plans of various post structures give us an idea of the type and size of the houses.

Ostereistedt (Passage Grave) — Images

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Badenstedt (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

In the Steinalkenheide south of Badenstedt is a Bronze Age burial mound field with about 70 burial mounds, at the northern edge lies the heavily destroyed megalithic tomb Badenstedt (also known as Fürstengruft, Steinhaus or Hünenkeller). The site is oriented northeast-southwest and was already heavily destroyed in Sprockhoff's recording in 1930. Six stones, including a capstone, were still present, but gave little information about the structure of the site. A capstone was removed in 1920 and used for a war memorial. The last official excavation in 1973 found that the grave had already been ransacked deeply, so that its original dimensions were difficult to estimate. It is believed that the chamber was 5.3 meters long and consisted of eight support stones and four capstones. At the time of the excavation were still 5 support stone and a capstone available. To make the tomb look more dignified, these stones were moved together and the capstone was put back on top. That means today's condition does not reflect the original structure.

Nevertheless due to the atmosphere and surrounding a nice site to visit!

The tomb can be reached via the Badenstedter Straße between Badenstedt and Oldendorf. Turn right (south) into the road Zum Mühlenberg when you enter the village Oldendorf. After 600 m you come to a T-crossing, turn right here and drive on this road for about 2.5 km until you reach the Steinkalkheide and see the tomb on the right side.

Visited May 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Restored megalithic tomb

The oldest structure of this prehistoric burial ground is this stone grave. According to a report from 1841, the then already damaged burial chamber was called "Steinhaus" or "Hünenkeller", around 1871 it was romantically called "Fürstenruft".

Like all similar sites, the stone monument was used as a family crypt around 2500 before Christ birth.
All the gaps between the large boulders were wedged with rubble and leaked from the outside with clay. The whole burial chamber was hidden under a mound of earth. Neolithic burial objects have not survived here.

In the archaeological investigation in 1978, a capstone and 5 apart, partially damaged supporting stones were still present.
A capstone was already removed in 1920 and used as a war memorial.
The district of Rotenburg restored the site according to the excavation findings and the example of other stone tombs. The remaining stones were brought together in a new arrangement.

Badenstedt (Chambered Tomb) — Images

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Steinfeld 1 (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

Steinfeld 1 is an approximately east-northeast west-southwest oriented chamber (5.2 x 1.9 m). It is surrounded by a round enclosure, which is rather unusual for this region. Only one support stone is missing, the rest are partly in situ. Three capstones lie on their support stones, one has fallen into the chamber. Formerly five stones could have covered the chamber. A small gap in the middle of a long side allowed access to the chamber.

The complex was reconstructed by repositioning overturned and displaced stones of the enclosure and adding the missing stones of the dry masonry between the stones. Only three stones of the enclosure were no longer available and had to be supplemented.

The only thing that bothers a bit is the nearby street, otherwise this is a great site to visit!

Drive from Steinfeld about 1 km northward on the L132 to Zeven. The tomb is located immediately to the right of the road under a group of trees. There is also a parking possibility right after the tomb on the right side of the road.

Visited May 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Megalithic tomb from the Neolithic

In the period of 2700-2000 BC the population of the so-called funnel beaker culture built stone tombs of huge boulders, but also burial mounds and wooden chamber graves. South of the Niederelbe, megalithic tombs did not originate earlier than 2500 BC.

Out of the burial chamber, a covered corridor led through the hill to the outside.

Here are bones and grave goods not preserved. Presumably each burial chamber contained several consecutive funerals. In other landscapes the megalithic tombs show clearly different burial rides. Finds from the Steinfeld grave are no longer available. The shape of the burial chamber indicates a late construction.

By reconstructing the damaged stones and reconstructing the intermediate masonry, the site was restored to nearer originality. Only three missing enclosure stones have been replaced.

Steinfeld — Fieldnotes

The megalithic tombs at Steinfeld were several tombs of unknown number at Steinfeld (Bülstedt) in Lower Saxony. Today, there are only two tombs, they have the Sprockhoff numbers 649 and 650. Several other tombs, which lay between Steinfeld and Wilstedt were destroyed in the 18th or 19th century.

Steinfeld 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

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Steinfeld 2 (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

Steinfeld 2 is an approximately north-south-oriented chamber with three support stones on the east side, two on the west side, one stone on the narrow sides and originally three capstones. During Sprockhoff's recording in 1930 a supporting stone on the east side was missing and the middle capstone had slipped, while the southern one was still in place. The tomb has been reconstructed, the middle capstone was put back in place.

To get to the tomb you drive from Nartum to Steinfeld. Immediately in front of the village entrance, the road makes a sharp left turn, here you drive straight on into a forest road and reached after about 100 meters a trail parking lot. From here, continue for about 350 m before the tomb, along with an information board, is on the left of the path.

Visited May 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Megalithic tomb

From 2700 to 2000 BC the stone tombs served our oldest peasants as crypts.

The huge boulders were moved and lifted by a few people using lifting beams and rollers. Transportation was best on hard frozen ground.
The capstones are trimmed sideways so that they could form a closed ceiling. There were gaps between the side stones. From this it can be seen that first the capstones were placed on a mound or wooden scaffolding in the final position and the side stones were fitted individually underneath. For this purpose, the gaps between the supporting stones were required as a space for movement. All spaces and gaps were wedged with rubble and sealed with clay from the outside. The whole was arched over by a round mound.

Steinfeld 2 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Steinfeld 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Steinfeld 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Steinfeld 2</b>Posted by Nucleus
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During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

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