The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Munkwolstrup 1 (Long Barrow) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Hüsby (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

Hüsby is a rectangular dolmen, a burial type that is very common in Schleswig-Holstein. The original site was located about one kilometer further west. It was examined in 1966 by G. Schäfer. The mound had a diameter of 40 m at a height of 3 m. On the fringe were three stone encircles and a circular ditch. The west-east orientated chamber has a size of 2.1 mx 0.8 m and is 0.9 m high. Of the original 2 capstones, only one is left on which there are 112 small cups.

Ceramics stood on the flint pile: a funnel cup stood in front of the north side. Immediately before the endstone, a funnel cup and the shards of a heavily crushed cup and a bowl were found. Next to the bowl was a battered baking plate.

Today the reconstructed dolmen is located just before the northern village exit of Hüsby on the road Am Ochsenweg, between Klein-Dannewerk and Schuby, on the left (if you drive northward). There is a bus stop right before the tomb, where you can park your car.

Visited November 2019

Hüsby (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

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Nebel 1 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

The long barrow Nebel 1 is a megalithic tomb consisting of two burial chambers on the North Sea island of Amrum and is part of the Archaeological Area. The long barrow is a rare, rectangular Hunenbed in east-west orientation with two transverse chambers. Although the enclosure consists only of very few stones, a size of about 35 m x 7 m is assumed. The long bed was examined in 1951, while several bones and skulls, flint axes, arrowheads, ornate ceramics and amber beads were discovered as grave goods.

The eastern chamber is an extended dolmen. The long sides consist of two support stones, the northern narrow side of a single support stone. On the southern side there is a half support stone and a 0.35 m high threshold stone. The width of the chamber is 2.5 × 1.4 m. On the chamber lay two capstones, one has been shifted, the other has fallen into the chamber.

The western chamber is similar to the eastern, but a little longer and narrower. The long sides are also formed from two pairs of support stones. The chamber has only one capstone.

Unfortunately, only four stones of a burial chamber are visible, the rest has already disappeared under the dunes.

The grave is next to the reconstruction of an Iron Age house in the Archaeological Area of ??Amrum, northwest of the Vogelkoje Meeram (Vogelkoje means Duck decoy). Boardwalks lead to the right of the Vogelkoje Meeram around a wildlife enclosure first to the Iron Age house and then to the tomb.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Since the Neolithic there are finds of megalithic tombs on Amrum. This grave site consisted of two burial chambers. The boulders lying in front of you belong to a burial chamber. It was uncovered in the 1950s. The second, which has already disappeared under the dunes today, was already robbed at the time.

Burial chamber 1
In the burial chamber several bones and skulls were discovered, which result from different burials. In addition, flintstone axes, arrowheads, richly ornamented ceramics and amber beads were found as grave goods.

Skull drill of the Stone Age
A skull had a so-called skull trepanning. A medical procedure in which the skullcap is opened with stone blades.

Trepanations were carried out, e.g. to treat skull bruises. Surprisingly, well over 50% of those affected survived the procedure. In this case, the nearly 30-year-old man did not survive the skull injury caused by a stone slash weapon despite surgery.

Nebel 1 (Long Barrow) — Images

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Nebel - Klöwenhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Between Nebel and Norddorf there are still three burial mounds: Makkanhugh, Kanshugh and Klöwenhugh. Klöwenhugh is probably the most prominent burial mound out of these three.

According to the on-site information board, some excavation did take place, but due to grave robbers and a bungled examination of a teacher and his students only one bronze sword and some cremated human bones are known as grave findings. To make matters worse, the sword was destroyed in 1889 during a house fire.

Klöwenhugh (which means "split burial mound"), lies directly on the L215 between Nebel and Norddorf. There is a parking area on the right with an information board. From here the tomb lies only 100 m north along the L215. Also you can walk to the Vogelkoje Meeram (Vogelkoje means Duck decoy) and the Archaeological Area with the megalithic tomb Nebel 1 from here.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

A Bronze Age grave
The burial mound called Klööwenhuuch is one of about 500 archaeological sites on the island of Amrum. It dates from the Middle Bronze Age (about 1600 to 1300 BC) and contains a main grave and a smaller tomb.

The main grave consisted of a clay-sealed, about 1 x 0.4 x 0.5 m stone cist containing cremated human bones and a double-bladed bronze sword. Above the main grave was a smaller stone cist that also contained cremated bones.

Grave robbers and archaeologists
Most burial mounds on Amrum were robbed long ago. The Klööwenhuuch was first examined in 1880 by the teacher and sexton Bandix Friedrich Bonken together with his students. However, this happened without any archaeological knowledge and methods. Most grave finds were sold, partly to the first Amrumer spa guests.

Only a year later, the Klööwenhuuch was expertly examined by Otto Olshausen. However, at this time all grave goods had disappeared from the burial mound. The bronze sword from the Klööwenhuuch was destroyed in 1889 during a house fire.

Christians and earth spirits
At the time of the introduction of the Reformation in 1522-1524, the burial mound, located exactly between Nebel and Norddorf, was said to have served as a place of gathering for the Protestant community. In addition, some Amrumer myths and legends intertwine around this burial mound. In it, for example, the invisible Onerbäänke (earth spirits) have lived.

Nebel - Klöwenhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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Nebel - Kanshugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Between Nebel and Norddorf there are still three burial mounds: Klöwenhugh, Makkanhugh and Kanshugh. Unlike Makkanhugh, Kanshugh is still clearly recognizable and and visible from afar.

Unfortunately I couldn't find any information about archaeological findings or excavation on this burial mound.

Kanshugh lies about 750 m north northwest from Makkanhugh on the same track. So take my directions from [[Makkanhugh] and continue on the same track for another 750 m. Kanshugh lies in a field to the left, about 100 m from the track.

Visited November 2019

Nebel - Kanshugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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Nebel - Makkanhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Between Nebel and Norddorf there are still three burial mounds: Klöwenhugh, Kanshugh and Makkanhugh. From these three Makkanhugh is the most ruined barrow. One can only guess its outlines, in a depression in the middle of the mound a single stone still peeks out.

Unfortunately I couldn't find any information about archaeological findings or excavation on this burial mound.

From Nebel take the road Waasterstigh (mainly used as a cycle path to Norddorf), pass the cemetery on the right and turn right after about 350 m into Lütt-Elks-Weg. After another 270 m, turn left and follow this track. Makkanhugh lies in the field on the left after about 210 m.

Visited November 2019

Nebel - Makkanhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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Steenodde - Esenhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

300 m west of Steenodde lies the largest Bronze Age burial mound of the island of Amrum. Esenhugh is abound 4.7 m high and has a diameter of 26.5 m. The dolmen of Steenodde lies about 420 m to the south.
A viking burial ground with formerly 88 burial mounds lies close by.

To get to the burial mound drive of the road Stianoodswai towards Steenodde. At the point where the first property is located on the right, a narrow dirt road turns left at an archaeological information sign.

Esenhugh lies 170 m along this dirt road on the left.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

COMMUNITY NEBEL
Burial mound Esenhugh and burial ground Steenodde


The burial mound Esenhugh is 4.70 m high and 26.50 m in diameter and one of the largest burial mounds of Amrum. His age is unknown, possibly it was already created in the Stone Age or the Bronze Age.
The burial ground of Steenodde consists of originally at least 88 burial mounds, which were excavated already in the last century. They date back to the Viking Age (10th-11th centuries) and are about 2,500 years younger than the Esenhugh. The dead were mostly burned and buried in urns.
Other burial mounds (from the Bronze Age 1500-1200 BC) are located in the area.

Steenodde - Esenhugh (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

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