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<b>United Kingdom</b>Posted by BigSweetieBalnakeilly Stone © Andy Sweet
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News

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Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas


For the first time, a detailed online atlas has drawn together the locations and particulars of the continues...
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd June 2017ce
Edited 5th July 2017ce

The 25th Festival of Archaeology will take place between the 11th - 26th July 2015


The Festival is a huge celebration of our incredible history here in the UK, and you don't have to be an archaeologist to join in. It's a chance for everyone to explore and uncover the past, see archaeology in action, and bring the history on your doorstep to life. We look forward to seeing you there... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
8th July 2015ce

Free open Days - 11 to 14 Sep - UK Wide


Find out what's open in your local area - Every where listed is free for the day!

http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/advanced-search

For more information about the European Heritage Days, visit www.ehd... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
10th September 2014ce
Edited 10th September 2014ce

Help wanted to create 3D modeling of megalithic sites


http://heritagetogether.org/?lang=en

"HeritageTogether is an AHRC-funded project run by Bangor, Aberystwyth and Manchester Metropolitan Universities in conjunction with Gwynedd Archaeological Trust... continues...
juamei Posted by juamei
20th February 2014ce
Edited 20th February 2014ce

British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online


British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online

http://ukra.jalbum.net/brac

Quite a few people will hopefully remember BRAC - the online image gallery covering British rock art sites... continues...
Posted by Chappers
2nd December 2013ce

CBA issue "Archaeology is about knowledge, not treasure" article


Following on the from ITV's "Britain's Secret Treasures" programme, the Council for British Archaeology have issued an excellent, unequivocal statement on their website... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th July 2012ce

What caused Britain's Bronze Age 'recession'?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12989605

A large gap in pre-history could signal that Britain underwent an economic downturn over 2,500 years ago... continues...
Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
7th April 2011ce

British ancient forests were patchy


From PlanetEarth online

What were Britain's primordial forests like before humans started tampering with the environment? The latest clues from a study of fossil beetles suggest that the ancient forest was patchy and varied in density across Britain... continues...
baza Posted by baza
30th November 2009ce
Edited 30th November 2009ce

Links

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Of barrows, burials and blades of bronze


A fascinating article on barrows and their history.
moss Posted by moss
28th August 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


How To: Report Dumped Rubbish or Damage to a Heritage Site

An article I wrote which details how to report damage or litter at prehistoric sites that you may find as you work your way through the sites on TMA. In short:

1. Take lots of photos.
2. Take 5 minutes to briefly write down the following:
- date
- site name
- site location (an OS ref will do)
- type of crime
- extent of crime
3. Ring the police on 999 if its happening right now and on 101 if its already happened. You do not have to give your name.
juamei Posted by juamei
8th June 2012ce
Edited 8th June 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


Spot the stone circle competition!

Can you recognise any of these stone circles from the aerial photos?
A friend just emailed me this link so thought I'd share it on here if anyone wants to have a go. Good luck!
Emma A Posted by Emma A
24th May 2012ce
Edited 24th May 2012ce

Old newspapers go on-line


All over the press today, the official launch of the British Library Newspaper website. May be of use to TMAers... a search for Stonehenge found 450 articles to read.
Mr Hamhead Posted by Mr Hamhead
30th November 2011ce
Edited 30th November 2011ce

The coins of the ancient Britons


Victorian guidebook to coins of various ancient British tribes By Sir John Evans from 1864 - A nighthawkers delight

Download the complete book in PDF via Google books
Chance Posted by Chance
25th July 2010ce

Mythology and rites of the British Druids


Mythology and rites of the British Druids as certained by national documents and compared with the general traditions and customs of heathenism, as illustrated by antiquaries of our age. With an appendix, containing ancient poems and extracts, with some remarks on ancient British coins.

by Davies, Edward
Published in 1809, Printed for J Booth (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Ancient man in Britain


Ancient man in Britain.
by Donald Alexander Mackenzie
Published in 1922, Blackie (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Life in early Britain


Life in early Britain
being an account of the early inhabitants of this island and the memorials which they have left behind them

by Windle, Bertram Coghill Alan Sir.
Published in 1897, David Nutt (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom


An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom.
by Murray, David
Published in 1896, MacLehose (Glasgow)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The antiquities of England and Wales


The antiquities of England and Wales.
by Grose, Francis
Published in 1785, S. Hooper (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.


The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.
by Evans, John Sir
Published in 1897, Longmans, Green, and Co. (London, Bombay)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Standing Stones & Monoliths - stories from the Paranormal Database


150 Recorded Paranormal events from the UK's Standing Stones & Monoliths
Chance Posted by Chance
25th October 2009ce

Latest posts for United Kingdom

Showing 1-10 of 117,400 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Dunan Choinnich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by Skye Dawn Posted by Skye Dawn
3rd March 2021ce

Gerrick Moor (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

The Smell of Water - The Tank Road


fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
3rd March 2021ce

Tolborough Tor Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tolborough Tor Cairn</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
2nd March 2021ce

Thimble Stones (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Thimble Stones</b>Posted by markj99<b>Thimble Stones</b>Posted by markj99<b>Thimble Stones</b>Posted by markj99<b>Thimble Stones</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
1st March 2021ce

The Spiral Stone (Carving) — Images

<b>The Spiral Stone</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
1st March 2021ce

Jersey — News

Rare Bronze Age spearhead discovered intact in Jersey


A rare and complete metal spearhead dating back thousands of years to the Bronze Age has gone on display in Jersey after being found on the island.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-jersey-56195939
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
1st March 2021ce

Carn Nant-y-Llys (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Cwm Ystwyth is pretty quiet these days... even during the height of a Ceredigion summer, with punters enjoying a brief respite from the all too necessary COVID-19 restrictions. Traffic making use of the single track road traversing the valley is 'sporadic', at worst, the scene primed for the shrill cry of a bird of prey - the magnificent red kite, perhaps? - to emphasise the silence by glorious exception. However, by all accounts, it was not always thus. Yeah, if a landscape can be said to be evoked by the universal language of music - and, to my mind, the gruff old 'punk' maestro made a pretty good case for this with the premiere of his 'Pastorale in F major' in 1808 - Cwm Ystwyth would surely require nothing less than a symphony to interpret its complex diversity. For me, the best place for a prospective composer to seek initial inspiration is upon the summit of Craig y Lluest at SN84997587, at the cwm's eastern extremity, a small Bronze Age cairn cemetery assisting no end with the all-important vibe. Here, the cwm stretches away to the west, arguably as sublime a representation of scenic splendour as Mid Wales has to offer.

https://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/19436/craig_y_lluest_cwmdeuddwr.html

The Afon Ystwyth - sourced from a series of contributory watercourses, including the Afon Diliw - begins its journey westward with alacrity... our composer considering an allegro con brio, perhaps?... the pace abating to, say, moderato as the cwm widens and dissipates some of the initial constrictive foreboding of the chasm formed by Esgair Elan and the aforementioned Craig y Lluest. Beyond this, however, the sight of the shattered flanks of Bryn Copa invokes apocalyptic notions of a bonkers Wagnerian prelude... or, at the very least, portentous Yamaha CS-80 synth chords (I'd go with the former unless Vangelis happens to be a mate). Not that it helps the ecology, granted - what's gone is gone and it ain't never coming back - but this industrial devastation has form. A lot of form, in fact, with silver, lead and zinc having been mined here stretching way back to Roman times, the apparent average life expectancy of miners (32) indicative of the savage disregard for human life by your progressive entrepreneur back in the day. True, time is a great healer, but nevertheless, the heart is sometimes torn asunder at the injustice of it all, isn't it? There is more, however: evidence of copper mining by Bronze Age locals upon Bryn Copa itself and, perhaps best of all, the discovery of the fantastic golden Banc Ty'nddôl sun-disc in 2002 (cue those Vox Humana Polymoog strings, methinks).

https://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/5072/copa_hill.html

It, therefore, comes as blessed relief to travel through the eponymous hamlet to enter the lushly wooded - including beech, so I understand - Hafod Uchtryd, ragged senses soothed by... an allegretto? Here, the B4574 to Devil's Bridge nowadays bypasses a curious, somewhat ragged arch erected in 1810 to celebrate George III's Golden Jubilee. Since the Hanoverian is now generally considered not to have been 'mad' - but rather a victim of bi-polar syndrome - it could be said, bearing in mind the extremes of the landscape itself, that the siting, a couple of years after the chaotic birth of Beethoven's masterpiece, is actually rather apt. 'What, what?' Anyway, the arch stands in a 'picnic spot which is, coincidentally, the starting point of several forestry walks... one of which happens to lead to the sentinel peak of the locale: Pen-y-Garn. Needless to say, contrary as ever, I decide, having made my way here from a wild camp upon the wondrous Pumlumon, to forgo the obvious in order to reprise a visit to the same made way back in 1999.

About a mile(ish) south-east of 'The Arch', just before the B4574 loops back towards Pont-rhyd-y-groes, a mountain road heads steeply to the left, arcing to the east, above Cwmystwyth village, to a prominent 'plantation' of trees on the right (south). Here there is plenty of space to park the car before, plastered with 'Factor 60' to combat the unfeasibly 'seasonal' Mid Walian weather, I continue on foot to where, at approx SN793754, a heavily overgrown 'sunken track' heads north beside a copse. Passing a ruined dwelling, ducking and diving under the impeding branches of trees as I do so, the green track continues through lush pasture to, eventually, meet converging tracks sweeping in from the right and left. The route, 'stony' underfoot, now begins the ascent proper, fording the cascades of the nascent Nant Perfedd, prior to cutting through a further copse and zig-zagging up Banc Myheryn. Increasingly expansive retrospective views alleviate some of the - it has to be said - relative monotony of the climb, the track making its serpentine way (one assumes those bloody Romans never ventured up here, then?) in a generally north-easterly direction to, in due course and not before time, arrive at the 2,005ft summit of the mountain.

That Pen-y-Garn (incidentally, you might also find it referred to as 'Bryn Garw' upon some older maps - assuming there are any pre-dating mine still extant in this digital age) is, despite being one of only three peaks exceeding 2,000ft within Cwmdeuddwr, in my estimation not exactly one of Wales' premier mountains... one can assume to be a 'given'. Nevertheless, there is a very good reason why I would recommend a visit to the dedicated Citizen Cairn'd, not to mention the incurably curious: it possess another small piece of the Bronze Age jigsaw of this land in the form of the shattered, but considerable remains of a funerary cairn. Not to mention a fine upland vibe... with sweeping views to the south across Cwm Ystwyth to the wilderness of 'The Green Desert', the watery heart of Mid Wales; west to Aberystwyth and the coast; east across brutal upland moor studded with small lakes, water sparkling in the sunshine... and, last but certainly not least, northward, the great crags of Craig Dolwen, towering above the deep, afforested defile Cwm Rhuddnant, leading the eye to Pumlumon. Herself. Hang on, that's more than one good reason, isn't it? Suggest you do the maths to save further confusion. As for the technical detail, Coflein notes the following:

"A ruinous Bronze Age round cairn, 15m in diameter & 0.4m high, is set on the summit of Pen y Garn. Only the base of the cairn has survived, the rest of it used to create a shelter which now occupies most of its interior. Towards its north edge, between shelter and cairn edge, is set a triangulation pilar." [D. Leighton & T. Driver, RCAHMW, 17 June 2013]

Hmm. If I may be permitted to raise a point of order, I would dispute the assertion that the shelter occupies 'most' of the cairn's interior, such is the extensive circumference of the circular footprint (making the arguable assumption that subsequent slippage across millennia has not inflated dimensions somewhat). That being said, the vertical profile of the monument is certainly minimal, at best, the considerable size of the parasitical shelter clearly indicative of heinous redistribution of material. The alternative name quoted for the monument - Carn Nant-y-Llys - suggests an association with a former 'law court' somewhere in the locale (unless my Welsh is even worse than my maths), although where the remains may be sited I couldn't say at this point. One assumes - indeed, would hope - that, what with such evidence of wanton destruction to a scheduled ancient monument extant, it is not current? Perish the thought.

Silence - for the most part, anyway - reigns supreme upon Pen-y-Garn. A decent composer might be thinking 'andante'... or not. However, obviously, this was not always the case with, as noted earlier, mining taking place on and around Bryn Copa for more-or-less the monument's full tenure as stony sentinel of Cwm Ystwyth. To tell you the truth, it is a difficult concept to take in, such is the unfettered tranquillity. Yeah, only the eolian tones of the wind acting upon the radio antenna 'stuck' within the OS trig pillar (a notice states the benefit to the local community in these COVID-19 impacted times of said 'aerial' aerial) - combined with the rather more inhomogeneous 'notes' caused by my good self simply being in Nature's way - are audible prior to the sudden arrival of two very poorly attired 'student-types from the direction of 'The Arch'. What they make of me, sun-bathing in full kit upon the footprint, is not evident since they immediately disappear within the 'muppet shelter' like, well... muppets, to hastily consume whatever it is such people eat before buggering off to once again leave me in utter peace. I mean, who would've foreseen it being cold upon a mountain top when it's hot down below? I ask you?

As it happens the great cairn - or at least what's left of it - is not the only iconic construction for the visitor to contemplate up here since, some way to the north, stands an extensive wind farm stretching across Rhestr Cerrig and Cefn Groes, like something out of that dystopian sci-fi novel Windy Miller so wanted to write after being evicted from Camberwick Green in '66. The sheer scale of these structures is emphasised when I spy a figure arrive at the base of one unfortunately skewed out of alignment with the others. Hey, is that a retro-styled hat and cider flagon in hand.. no, surely not? Funny thing is I've actually grown rather used to these wind turbines now... as long as I'm not directly beneath them... or they are located upon 'classic peaks', why not? Perhaps it should be up to the locals to have the final say in such circumstances, methinks?

With the continuance of such excellent weather into the early evening, I'm even more loathe to depart than usual, but there you are... in the final reckoning there really is no choice. Back at the car, following a leisurely descent, I elect to camp up for the night below Craig y Lluest. It is a wondrous spot, the Afon Ystwyth fading from sight through the entrance 'jaws' of the cwm, Highland 'coos' adding the occasional distinctive 'vocal embellishment' to the proceedings, harsh bovine utterances rising above the persistent 'gurgle' of the fast-flowing water. Once again, it is hard to reconcile what used to occur a little to the west: all the trials, tribulations, triumphs, failures.... danger, exploitation and death. Nevertheless, it is a story well worth recounting for its intrinsic human interest. All the time overseen by that pile of stones upon Pen-y-Garn...
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
28th February 2021ce
Showing 1-10 of 117,400 posts. Most recent first | Next 10