The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Miscellaneous Posts by markj99

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Peatshiel Sike (Standing Stone / Menhir)

There should be a reason for a standing stone to be sited in its particular location. Looking at Peatshiel Sike I thought the profile of the stone viewed from SW mimics the summit profile of Bodesbeck Law.
Alternatively the stones E-W orientation may suggest a lunar standstill in between Saddle Yoke and Carrifran Gans summits.

Weetwood Moor (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art)

There is a cornucopia of Rock Art pictures of Weetwood Moor, 11 individual sets of pictures listed under Weetwood, Wooler at the end of the Northumberland section of the BRAC website (go to Links).

Cairnholy (Chambered Cairn)

I have added an updated link to the restored BRAC Rock Art archive compiled by Jan Brouwer and Gus Van Veen. The Dutchmen used Rockartuk to record and report on Rock Art the length and breadth of the UK taking exceptional pictures of Rock Art.
Sadly, Jan Brouwer died in 2011. Coincidentally Fotopic.net who hosted the archive ceased trading and the archive was lost. However, the photos were rescued and reposted on a new BRAC platform.

There is a link to the extensive Cairnholy on BRAC collection of pictures at the end of the listing.

Leskernick North Circle (Stone Circle)

Leskernick North Circle was added to the Historic England List (go to Links) on 16/10/19.

'The stone circle comprises a recumbent stone (4m long) a little north of the circle’s centre with 25 stones in an almost-perfect circle approximately 23m in diameter.'

The above quote is an extract from Historic England's summary of Leskernick North Circle. A more detailed account is contained therein.

According to Historic England turf was cleared round the stones in 2018 so the circle will perhaps look more complete now.

Hough Cairn (Cairn(s))

Hough Cairn is not a large cairn however its proximity to Hough Stone Circle S gives it a greater significance in the landscape. What is the relationship between the cairn and the stone circle? Which site was erected first?
Canmore ID 21432 assigns the Hough Stone Circle S to the Neolithic or Bronze age but Canmore ID 21433 leaves the age of Hough Cairn unassigned. Excavation of the Hough Cairn would provide the answer but there are no archaeological records. The mystery remains.

Holm of Daltallochan (Stone Circle)

I had the same doubts as CARL about the authenticity of the stone circle at Holm of Daltallochan. The stones were not earthfast, they were a variety of sizes and the location round a small hill is unusual.
At best I would describe it as a Stone Setting.

Hawk's Tor (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

There is a proposal by The Stone Rows of Great Britain website that the row of small stones on top of Hawk’s Tor are a rare type of stone row. 5 stones up to 1m high have been carefully wedged into a rock crevice. This 5m row of stones runs from SE to NW. The stone row aligns with a prominent notch in an adjacent tor stack to the SE.
According to their calculations the midwinter sun viewed from the NW along the stone row will rise in the base of the notch.
The Stone Rows of Great Britain report (go to Links) gives a detailed survey of the site.

Bagbie Cairn (Cairn(s))

I revisited Bagbie cairn complex to investigate a speculative standing stone listed as Canmore ID 281565 (go to Links). There is an earthfast stone c. 3 feet by 3 feet built into the dry stane dyke 30 yards S of the pair of stones in Bagbie Cairn. It is in direct alignment between the cairn and Bagbie standing stone. The stone, located at NX 4979 5635, is an intriguing addition to a complex site.
There is a public path to the cairn starting at the right angle bend just before Bagbie Sheds however the sign has fallen to the ground.

Bagbie

I revisited Bagbie cairn complex to investigate a speculative standing stone listed as Canmore ID 281565. There is an earthfast stone c. 3 feet by 3 feet built into the dry stane dyke 30 yards S of the pair of stones in Bagbie Cairn. It is in direct alignment between the cairn and Bagbie standing stone. The stone located at NX 4979 5635 is an intriguing addition to a complex site.
There is a public path to the cairn starting at the right angle bend just before Bagbie Sheds however the sign has fallen to the ground.

Bardennoch (Cairn(s))

Directions: There is room to park at Carnavel Farm junction on the W side of Carsphain just before you cross the bridge. Follow the path to Polmaddy uphill for 1.5 miles until you observe Bardennoch hill trig point on your L. Continue on this path for a further 300 yards then bear NE over moorland until you reach a fence. Follow this fence E for several hundred yards until you reach a gate and dry stane dyke at NX 5685 9120. Bardennoch Cairn in overlain by this dyke.

The Muckle Stane (Monkton) (Natural Rock Feature)

The map reference given on the plaque is confusing. The Muckle Stane was moved from a nearby field but NS 285 360 is in the middle of the sea. If you transpose the numbers NS 360 285 is in Monkton & Prestwick New Cemetery.
Dane Love (Ayrshire: Discovering A County (2003)) states that it was originally sited in a field off Charles Avenue.

Mid Gleniron Round Cairn

Despite it's relative isolation in the modern world the complex of sites at Mid Gleniron indicates it must have been a hub of social activity. The well preserved Round Cairn overlooks three chambered cairns and numerous scattered clearance cairns. Excavation in the sixties revealed occupation of Mid Gleniron from the Neolithic Period. The chambered cairns were constructed in multiple stages implying a continuous population at Mid Gleniron.

Doon Castle (Broch)

Doon Castle Broch is my favourite local site to visit. The name may be confusing to some people because there is a Doon Castle in Ayrshire on Loch Doon. Doon Castle Broch is on Ardwell Point in Dumfries and Galloway.
A site of this quality deserves more visitors however the isolated location discourages people. There is the problem of the rocky road after West Ardwell Farm however it just requires careful driving on a short stretch to reach the Ardwell Bay car park. There is a sandy beach for non-antiquarians to amuse themselves while TMAers visit Doon Castle.
Directions: From Stranraer head towards Sandhead on the A716. Drive past Sandhead and take the 1st R signposted for Kirkmadrine. (Incidentally, Kirkmadrine is a short signposted detour and well worth a visit). Keep straight on this road for 1.5 miles until you reach a crossroads. Continue straight onto a dead-end road for Ardwell Bay. Follow this single track for 1 mile until you reach a sharp bend at West Ardwell Farm. Continue straight on the rough farm road for around 0.5 miles until you reach Ardwell Bay car park. Walk round the rough road until it stops. Take the Public Path over a style. Follow this path round the coast for around 500 yards to find Doon Castle.
Previous 20 | Showing 21-33 of 33 miscellaneous posts. Most recent first
I love to travel, especially to antiquarian sites. I'm working through the extensive Cornwall site list with an annual week holiday. Avebury is my favourite spiritual destination. Las Vegas is my favourite sinful destination.

I also enjoy hill climbing however as time passes the hills grow steeper. I have climbed around 30 munros, however, I've also climbed The Cobbler, Stac Pollaidh and Suilven so height is not the only criteria.

I used to play golf (9 handicap) and support Queen of the South however I gave up both bad habits. Horse racing was a more recent obsession. Epsom and Newmarket are my favourite racecourses. At the moment my current obsession is music gigs: Arcade Fire, Dinosaur Jr, Sparks, Jesus and Mary Chain and Belle & Sebastian, my favourite band.

My TMA Content: