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England

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2100 sites
Northern England
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Southern England

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Uffington White Duck

Those zany National Truss People really had me going then.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/news/second-chalk-figure-discovered-near-uffington-white-horse?campid=Social_Central_Twitter_Conservation_Duck-010417
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
1st April 2017ce

Environment Agency LiDAR - open data

"From September 2015 all our LIDAR data will become Open Data and everyone will be able to use it for free."

Although primarily used for flood risk assessment, there will be lots of archaeology to see.

https://environmentagency.blog.gov.uk/2015/06/16/free-mapping-data-will-elevate-flood-risk-knowledge/
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th July 2015ce

English Heritage to become charity by 2015

English Heritage has been given £80m in the government's Spending Review as part of plans for the organisation to become a charity. Some of the £80m awarded by the government will help to set up the charity so it will be fully operational by March 2015.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23064356
Chance Posted by Chance
28th June 2013ce

English Heritage and British Museum commission study into illegal metal detecting

English Heritage and the British Museum are so alarmed they have commissioned a £100,000 study into the practice. It could lead to new legislation to combat offenders.

Spotted at:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/07/08/nmetal108.xml
Posted by Robert Carr
10th July 2007ce
Edited 10th July 2007ce

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<b>England</b>Posted by Chance <b>England</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo

Miscellaneous

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Some information that may be of use to TMA-ers looking at OS maps of England and Wales, from "Field Archaeology - Some Notes For Beginners Issued by the Ordnance Survey" (1963 - Fourth edition), chapter entitled "Tumuli":

"Today the term tumulus is reserved for those earthen mounds either known or presumed to be covering burials. Formerly a class of larger mounds, now known to belong to early medieval castles also received this name in error ..., but now are given their correct technical description or are described as 'Mound' in the appropriate type. All piles of stones are called cairns whether their funerary character is known or not, but the use of an 'antiquity' type will mean that the Survey believes it to be sepulchral. In some very lofty situations it will be obvious that they are not graves. Where a mound has a local name which clearly indicates the belief that it is a burial place the descriptive name tumulus is not added."
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th January 2009ce
Edited 20th January 2009ce

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ADS


You can download EH's Archaeological Monograph on 'The Neolithic Flint Mines of England' (1999) by Topping, Barger and Field, from the ADS website.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th December 2014ce

Ancient Craft


Ancient craft is dedicated to the archaeology of primitive crafts and technologies that encompass the three prehistoric ages: STONE; BRONZE and IRON. This includes working with materials such as stone (also known as "flintknapping"), wood, bone, horn, leather, metals and cloth (plant fibres, and wools).

Follow Ancient Craft on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AncientCraftUK
Chance Posted by Chance
8th April 2014ce

Portable Antiquities Scheme Database


"The Scheme's database holds records of artefacts and coins found by the public, whilst pursuing a wide range of activities (the majority from metal detecting). We do not record details of objects found by archaeologists, and these data can be found within the local Historic Environment Office."

"The half a million objects recorded mark was reached on March 21st 2010."
Chance Posted by Chance
25th July 2012ce
Edited 25th July 2012ce

Early British Trackways, Moats, Mounds, Camps, and Sites


A Lecture given to the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club, at Hereford, September, 1921, by Alfred Watkins

Download complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
10th July 2010ce

Grave-mounds and their contents


Grave-mounds and their contents
a manual of archaeology, as exemplified in the burials of the Celtic, the Romano-British, and the Anglo-Saxon periods

by Llewellynn Frederick William Jewitt
Published in 1870, Groombridge (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Latest posts for England

Showing 1-10 of 50,652 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Mulfra Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — News

Mulfra Quoit vandalised with painting of aliens


https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/gallery/anger-aliens-appear-ancient-site-3717447.amp
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th January 2020ce

Hampton Down (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Hampton Down</b>Posted by texlahoma<b>Hampton Down</b>Posted by texlahoma texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
8th January 2020ce

The Hellstone (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>The Hellstone</b>Posted by texlahoma texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
8th January 2020ce

Peek Hill (Ring Cairn) — Miscellaneous

In the absence of any other detail relating to the remains of this ring cairn - set a little to the south-west of Peek Hill's summit and offering some excellent panoramic views - Devon and Dartmoor HER has this to say:

[National Monuments Record, 2019, Pastscape, 2007 survey data (Website). SDV362732].

"The heavily disturbed and robbed cairn occupies a high point on Peek Hill that offers an impressive 360 degree vista. The interior is composed of a confused spread of fragmentary rock slabs and boulders that gives the impression of quarrying disturbance. There are numerous leaning slabs but how many have been artificially erected is difficult to discern as some are clearly natural strata. Perhaps a rocky outcrop was cut away when the cairn was constructed. The central rather ragged rectangular pit is heavily disturbed probably the result of an unrecorded excavation. Surveyed and investigated at 1:2500 scale (citing Fletcher, M. J., 11/05/2007, English Heritage Field Investigation)"

Although ravaged, the substantial footprint and excellent placement of this cairn make it well worth incorporating within a short circular walk featuring the Sharpitor stone rows and cairn circle/cist. Hey, why not have a scramble upon Sharpitor itself as well?
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
29th December 2019ce

Peek Hill (Ring Cairn) — Images

<b>Peek Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
29th December 2019ce

Priddy Nine Barrows (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

Tis but a short walk from the B3135 to Ashen hill barrows, and about the same again to the Nine barrows. The first two we come to are separated from the other seven by a wall and over a hundred yards, one is quite low and the other has suffered at the hands of time two large scoops taken from it's interior.
Popping over the wall, the next barrow reached is a very low barrow compared to the others, barely a couple of feet high, the next one is taller. I move along the line this way and that, the barrows vary in height. The last two are the most interesting, the penultimate barrow has a ditch round it, possibly a bell barrow or something. The final barrow is right at the top of North Hill, it might even be the biggest barrow, and someone has built a not unattractive stone circle on it's summit, pilfering stones from the adjacent wall, as any welsh farmer will tell you, that is how it's done.
Off to one side away from the line of barrows is one more, so in all taking them all (Ashen Hill)into account there are eighteen barrows up here, it is an astonishing place, every bit as interesting as the line of henges and massively more visitable.
Come here!
postman Posted by postman
28th December 2019ce

Ashen Hill Barrows (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

I parked on the B3135 opposite Harptree lodge then walked back up to the gate opposite the southern henge. Hopping the gate and walking across the field the barrows cut a very impressive silhouette against the skyline. I head to the far right hand barrow first, back home i'd drive a hundred miles to see a barrow like this, there's eight of them here, well seventeen or eighteen actually but......
I stand atop the western barrow and look along the line of barrows, six are in a line but the far eastern two are off line and curving the line to the south. I make my way along the line going round this one up the next and round that one. It's worth noting about now the view to the south, almost paradoxically to North Hill and it's group of nine barrows, prosaically named Priddy Nine barrows, that one must have taken a while.
Ashen Hill barrows are every bit as cool and impressive as Priddy Nine barrows, I just wanted to say that, I don't know weather it means anything to anyone but I'd heard of Priddy nine barrows but not of Ashen hill barrows, and I should have.
Having said that I gird my loins and stride of to the nine barrows.
postman Posted by postman
28th December 2019ce

Stony Littleton (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Fortune favours the old.

This years winter solstice has obligingly fallen on a Sunday for me, quite a feat as any other day and I would miss it, so even though I've been at work before 5am all week, I'm happy to get up even earlier and drive the drive on my own down to Somerset, and seeing as I hit fifty last month, happy chance benefits the aging.

Even though I went too far on the M5 and ended up going the long way round Bath and Bristol, I still got to the custom made car park for Stoney Littleton before sunrise. But it was full, a motor home gleefully took up half of it and five cars took up the rest. Consternation.
I knew there would be other people here, but I expected to be able to park. So I did, in a one car space along side the road further up. Then I walked back to the car park, crossed the little foot bridge, and went up the hill.

It's been such a long time since I was last here, so long ago that I don't have any digital photos of the place, it was a winter solstice that last time too, but it was a grey day and the sun never showed up. So with a mix of blue sky and fluffy whites I was feeling pretty fortunate. As I pass the sign pointing to the mound I can see there are indeed other people here, A guy with a cowboy type looking hat stands atop the chamber, as I pass over the stile I start to hear things, a heart beat? the rhythm of the universe perhaps? I approach the entrance of the chamber, there's a woman in an oilskin coat, we nod at each other, the noise is louder now, the heart beat has quickened, the pulse of nature? No.
It is a twat with a drum, funny, there was a plonker with a drum here last time too, and he spoke like a Bristolian too, grooooan does he come here every year and take up the end of the passage, I think this is the case.

So, bereft of the best seat in the house, I walk round the structure, stand on top of the structure, then pick a spot to stand by the entrance and wait for the sun. It finally arrives at about a quarter to nine, quite late right? The chamber is on a slight hill looking up the hill, so you have to wait for the sun and when it gets here it wont be a big beautiful orange ball, but rather a bright white light, this presumably was intentional, they didn't want the faint wan light of first rising, but the strong light of a risen sun.
Just then a bloke erupted from the chamber, he looked at me, I looked at him, then I looked at the open entrance, and in I go. My chamber was the first on the right, opposite me was a woman, the mate of the bloke that just left, then she left, uncomfortable alone in the dark. Further into the passage I suspect each chamber has a body in it, the drummer takes up the back of the passage, the best seat in the house. An older man then comes past me making for the light at the end of the tunnel, so I move deeper into the chamber and take up a seat in the middle left chamber. The sun is doing it's thing, it looks phenomenal streaming along the passage and lighting up perfectly some twat with a drum, I decide upon some photos and then exit the chamber myself, am I reborn, can I see the place in a new light, hard to tell, so I go on walkabout to see the place from a different field. Up hill the walk takes me, then round and then back, not a long walk, always keeping the chambers entrance in sight, when I get back it's all empty and I'm alone with the edifice, I get into every chamber, and finally take up the best seat in the house. It's wet, dripping, they were definitely not sitting on the floor. Oddly, maybe, the bit I like best inside the passage is where it narrows to the width of a slim man, me. Purpose made.
postman Posted by postman
28th December 2019ce

Priddy Nine Barrows (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Priddy Nine Barrows</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
27th December 2019ce
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