The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

County Dublin

County

Sites/groups in County Dublin:

10 posts
Ashtown Demesne Round Barrow(s)
6 posts
1 site
Athgoe Hill Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Balcunnin Standing Stone / Menhir
9 posts
Ballinascorney Upper Round Barrow(s)
6 posts
Ballybetagh Cairn(s)
25 posts
Ballybrack Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
29 posts
Ballyedmonduff Wedge Tomb
12 posts
Ballymaice Passage Grave
6 posts
Ballymorefinn Cist Cist
6 posts
Ballymorefinn Hill Outcrop Rocky Outcrop
7 posts
Balrothery Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Barnageeragh Cairn(s)
Barnaslingan Rocky Outcrop
6 posts
Belgard Deer Park Cairn(s)
3 posts
Belgard Deer Park Stone Circle
19 posts
Boherboy Standing Stones
8 posts
Bohernabreena Rath
36 posts
Bremore Passage Grave
5 posts
Brenanstown Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Carrickgollogan Wedge Tomb
Carrigeenoura Round Barrow(s)
5 posts
Claremont Artificial Mound
8 posts
Coolock Artificial Mound
3 posts
1 site
Corduff Artificial Mound
11 posts
Crookan Cairn Cairn(s)
Crooksling Cairn(s)
9 posts
Crooksling Round Barrow(s)
15 posts
Cunard Portal Tomb
1 post
Dalkey Island Hillfort
3 posts
Damastown Artificial Mound
4 posts
The Druids' Judgement Seat Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
Drumanagh Promontory Fort
8 posts
Drumnigh Artificial Mound
5 posts
Dublin Zoological Gardens Chambered Tomb
5 posts
Fairy Castle Cairn(s)
7 posts
Foxrock Cairn(s)
Garristown Artificial Mound
4 posts
Glassamucky Artificial Mound
11 posts
Glassamucky Brakes Stone Circle
3 posts
Glassamucky Brakes Standing Stone / Menhir
19 posts
Glassamucky Mountain Bullaun Stone
7 posts
Glenaraneen Crannog
12 posts
Glencullen Standing Stone / Menhir
26 posts
Glendruid Portal Tomb
11 posts
Grange Sacred Well
3 posts
Grange (Newcastle By.) Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Hollywood Great Artificial Mound
6 sites
Howth
2 posts
Ho Stone, Balcunnin Standing Stone / Menhir
Inch Artificial Mound
Kilcrea Artificial Mound
Kilgobbin Standing Stone / Menhir
13 posts
Killakee Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Killiney Hill/Dalkey Commons Cairn(s)
5 posts
Kill of the Grange Bullaun Stone
2 sites
Kilmashogue
12 posts
Kilmashogue Portal Tomb
4 posts
Kiltalawn Standing Stone / Menhir
13 posts
Kiltiernan Portal Tomb
6 posts
Kingswood Artificial Mound
Knockandinny Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Knockannavea Cairn(s)
2 posts
Knockanvinidee Artificial Mound
1 post
Knockbrack Hillfort
11 posts
Knockmaroon Burial Chamber
6 posts
Lambay Island Cairn(s)
12 posts
Laughanstown Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Leopardstown Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Lucan and Pettycannon Souterrain
1 post
Lugg Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
13 posts
Lugg Henge
1 site
Lugmore Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Lusk Bullaun Stone
Mallahow Artificial Mound
Monpelier Standing Stone / Menhir
20 posts
Monpelier (Hell Fire Club) Passage Grave
1 post
Mountseskin Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
36 posts
Mount Venus Burial Chamber
Nags Head Artificial Mound
Newtown Artificial Mound
5 sites
Newtown Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
7 posts
Newtown lower Round Barrow(s)
5 posts
Palmerstown Lower Round Barrow(s)
23 posts
1 site
Piperstown Cairn(s)
Piperstown Standing Stone / Menhir
Piperstown Stone Circle
Portmarnock Artificial Mound
5 posts
Raheen Standing Stones
4 posts
Raheendhu/Ballinascorney Rath
6 posts
Rathcoole Holed Stone
2 sites
Rockbrook
7 posts
Rush Chambered Tomb
4 sites
Saggart Hill
3 posts
3 sites
Seahan Hill
Shankhill Wedge Tomb
Skidoo Artificial Mound
3 posts
Stillorgan Park Cist (Destroyed)
6 posts
Sutton South Artificial Mound
5 posts
Tallaght Bullaun Stone
11 posts
Taylorsgrange Portal Tomb
Three Rocks Mountain Rocky Outcrop
3 posts
Tibradden Chambered Cairn
6 posts
Tibradden Wedge Tomb
Two Rocks Mountain Passage Grave
1 post
Westown North Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Woodtown Cursus

News

Add news Add news

Materialitas: Working Stone, Carving Identity March 9-10th 2007


The UCD School of Archaeology and Humanities Institute of Ireland, University College Dublin present a conference on the materiality of stone, with an evening reception and keynote address by Richard Bradley on Friday 9th March, and papers by invited
Speakers including specialists on stone monuments, lithic objects, rock art and quarrying, o... continues...
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th January 2007ce
Edited 12th January 2007ce

Kingship and Sacrifice Exhibition


"Kingship & Sacrifice" will be officially opened by Arts Minister John O'Donoghue this afternoon at the Museum of Ireland in Dublin.

It'll include the recently found bog bodies from Oldcroghan, Co Offaly and Clonycavan, Co Meath.

Admission is free. There's a tour on the 24th June from 14:00-15:00... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Bronze Age Forum - Dublin

The next meeting of the Bronze Age Forum will be hosted by the School of Archaeology, University College Dublin. The meeting is open to anyone with an interest in the Bronze Age archaeology of Ireland, Britain and our nearest Continental neighbours.

Date 17-19 November 2006

Further information regarding the meeting will be made available soon at: www.ucd.ie/archaeology/groups/BronzeAgeForum
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
15th June 2006ce
Edited 18th June 2006ce

Bog bodies from Dublin area unveiled

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4589638.stm

The two men (one a giant 6'6" compared to the other who was 5'2") met their sticky ends (no pun intended) in bogs at Clonycavan and Croghan in the Iron Age. They were both found in 2003.
There will be a 'Timewatch' programme about them on the BBC on 20th January.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
7th January 2006ce
Edited 7th January 2006ce

'Carrickminders' celebrate archaeologists return


an update of the M50 saga


The Irish Examiner 08 Nov 2002

By Caroline O'Doherty

THE National Roads Authority has denied protestors' claims of victory after archaeologists resumed work on the controversial Carrickmines Castle site... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
8th November 2002ce

Latest posts for County Dublin

Showing 1-10 of 788 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Drumnigh (Artificial Mound) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Drumnigh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Drumnigh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Drumnigh</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
30th September 2023ce

Ballybrack (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Ballybrack</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
18th September 2023ce

Ballyedmonduff (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Ballyedmonduff</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
9th September 2023ce

Glendruid (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Glendruid</b>Posted by mound-dweller<b>Glendruid</b>Posted by mound-dweller Posted by mound-dweller
28th August 2023ce

Glendruid (Portal Tomb) — Fieldnotes

My partner and I very recently moved to the Republic of Ireland for school, and have been staying in the DĂșn Laoghaire area, trying to see as many prehistoric sites in the area as possible. On a previous visit last year we learned about Glendruid but didn't have the opportunity to visit. We intended to remedy that when we arrived this time, and paid a visit to the Valley Of The Druid on August 8th.

Going up the Brennanstown road, we attempted to find the oft-mentioned 'Dolmen House' to request access like polite earth-worshippers, but either it has been renamed or taken under new management since the last reports because a home of that name was nowhere to be found along the road in the vicinity of the dolmen. Upon asking at a house which mapping programs assured us was the closest to the site of the dolmen, we were instructed by an unseen voice inside the house, via the medium of a "ring light," that we had to trek back and take the Lehaunstown road around to the other side of the eponymous valley in order to visit Glendruid. Alright, off we go!

Off we trekked down the aforementioned lane, intending to continue our streak of politeness and ask in at a nearby home for the best way to visit. The residents of the last house on the right before the Lehaunstown road passes over a tramway and veers away from the area of the dolmen, however, left in an automobile as soon as we arrived, and were unavailable for megalith-related inquiries. Using our natural-born smarts and sense of direction, we wandered a short ways back down the lane and discovered a break in the hedge where one might scramble over a low stone wall and gain access to the hinterland beyond and thereby draw closer to the dolmen. The opening was marked by a fetching purple graffito of a fish - future seekers are advised to keep an eye out for this! Beyond the wall, we passed through a small meadow before entering a moist and appealing patch of Irish Atlantic Rainforest, which, according to our mapping programs, hugged the edges of a headwater of the Laughlinstown River as it proceeded to river and onwards to the Irish Sea. Descending into the Valley, following a rough trail through the trees and ferns, we soon discovered a more established path following the water upstream towards the site of the dolmen. At a certain point there emerges an open spot in the foliage to the right of the trail, where one can spot a rocky ford. An elderly man with an expensive-looking digital camera was present here, and upon informing him of our mission to visit the prehistoric power site he let us know that the best way across was a short scramble over a tree nearby that had fallen across the waterway. Following this advice, we emerged...

...into Glendruid! The back of the house we had asked at earlier was visible on the hill immediately opposite the ford, separated from us by an apparently impenetrable boundary of ferns and dense, wild, green growth. Off to our right and down a short trail is the dolmen itself - grand, weighty, utterly massive, its capstone radiating earth energies, appearing to brood over the landscape. Previous photos of this site available on The Modern Antiquarian and Megalithic Ireland show the dolmen standing in a neatly-mown lawn of short grass - not so on our visit! The entire small valley, enclosed on three sides by rainforest and one side by steep hill, was filled with living and dead wildflowers, tall grasses, ferns, and "weeds," in some places knee-high, in others above our heads. The dolmen appears to emerge out of this, but does not seem to tower over the landscape as it would in more tamed surroundings. Rather, like some great stone tortoise, it hunkers down among the foliage. The chamber enclosed by the upright stones is impressive, easy to stand up and move within and able to easily accommodate a crowd of 5 or 6 stone-seekers. The capstone emanates a sense of unfathomable weight from underneath, but the orthostats (and concrete reinforcement, courtesy of the OPW) seem to handle it easily. All in all, a deeply affecting place, and one in which the journey of discovery figures heavily in the overall experience. The trip back out to Cabinteely by the same route we entered was less arduous, knowing the way.

A couple weeks later, on August 23rd, I made a solitary return visit to the Valley Of The Druid. On this trip, I was informed by some local adolescents that there is an alternate path to Glendruid that follows the river all the way from the Lehaunstown road. About a half-kilometer from the turn-off of the Brennanstown road, the Lehaunstown road crosses the river, and the water can be heard rushing by underneath the massive stone bridge. On the north side of the road here, there is an opening in the foliage that allows on to enter into the rainforest and, once inside, discover a track along the water that leads all the way to the fording site mentioned above. This trail leads through much denser and considerably more fae sections of the forest than that crossed in the trek from the meadow, and is well worth a look-see.

Safe stoning!
Posted by mound-dweller
28th August 2023ce

Ballinascorney Upper (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Ballinascorney Upper</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
2nd June 2023ce

Glassamucky Brakes (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Glassamucky Brakes</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th April 2023ce
Showing 1-10 of 788 posts. Most recent first | Next 10