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Pea Low (Chambered Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman<b>Pea Low</b>Posted by postman

Steep Low (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Steep Low</b>Posted by postman

Narrowdale Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Narrowdale Hill</b>Posted by postman

Pen-y-Gaer (Aberglaslyn) (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

A couple of miles south of Aberglaslyn on the A498 there is a house set back from the road, it has a nice garden, just past it is the parking place, a little layby with room for three or four cars. We the occupants of third car exited said vehicle and walked back up the road following the now wide and slow moving river Glaslyn, but only for a hundred yards then we turn left and up hill on a farm track passing a rusty shack on the corner(you can see it on streetview).
This is the very much up hill section of the walk, it's steep and slippy and because of the thick wooded slopes there is no view. But on the upside I love walking in the woods of Snowdonia, because of the abundant rainfall these woods are as lush and verdant as the proverbial garden, a river runs along side the path plunging over a hundred falls. Moss covers just about everything, ferns, falls and forts, who could ask for more.
The easy to follow path zigzags it's way up until it comes out of the woods and onto the open hill side, there would have been good views, particularly of Cnicht east across the valley, but the mist and grey skies that had bothered us this whole summer solstice morning, was still bothering us, all in a days stone hunting these days.
This path runs right next to the fort, so it was with relative ease that we reached this minor league player in the game of stones.
We leave the path and ascend the rock, passing some very unusual looking rocks we enter through what surely must be the original entrance, now walled up. This modern wall encloses the hill top and is built from the old fort wall, in places it has used all the stone from the fort, and in places there is still much stone spread still beneath the wall.
It lightly but persistently rained nearly the whole time we were there, Eric hunkered down whilst I explored and photographed.
Farmer has not only built a new wall out of the fort but there are three annexes inside it too, and lots of ferns, soaking wet ferns.
It came all too soon to be the time to go, so we climbed back over the new wall and exited the fort via the correct exit, just in time to note that the low clouds had moved on somewhat revealing a decent section of the best place in Wales and England, not a green field in sight, and more trees than I thought were in the whole national park. I asked Eric to sit tight whilst I went for a little walk up there and there, points at rocky vantage points, from up there the view was stunning, I could now see Cnicht, across the valley and far above us and a touch round the corner Moel Hebog and it's cairn cemetery, but not Snowdon, the mists still clung on tightly over there. I'll have to come back on an even nicer day, there are hut circles and hut circles that might be ring cairns and two kilometers west a stone row, so until then, we'll continue to avoid dying horribly so we can keep on with a game of stones.

Pen-y-Gaer (Aberglaslyn) (Hillfort) — Images

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Newgrange (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Newgrange</b>Posted by postman

Glyn (Burial Chamber) — Fieldnotes

Nine years ago I had trouble finding this site and I couldn't really work out why, I think I know why now. The 1:50,000 map has the burial chamber as being south east of a footpath, or so I thought, closer inspection has the footpath turning into a Bridle path. I was on the wrong footpath. So here's the definitive directions.
I will presume you have found the east west minor road that runs from the B5108 to the A5025 south of Benllech, look for an off road called Maes Llydan it should be opposite a Bridle path, park on Maes Llydan and walk off down the Bridle path.
keep an eye out left through the thin line of trees lining the path, when you've walked past one field on the left it's there in the next field right up against the hedge, it is visible and can be spotted by the observant.

It really did take ages to find it, I nearly gave up, but a trio of helpful horses helped me out, they buoyed my spirits and had I known at the time where the chamber was I might have thought they were shepherding me in the right direction, they were.
Trees often help me out too, it sounds incredibly stupid, even to me, but the number of times I've been close to quitting only to make for a nearby tree and have the problem immediately resolved, so if trees know lots then horses will no all, logic see.
In the end we more or less stumbled across the site, it's still free of the close by hedge, but the brambles behind it are quite thick and I had to clear the entrance of the tomb to get a good look inside. One thing I hadn't noted last time was the sea view, perhaps the hedge was even higher before, it's always best to have a sea view isn't it ? unless it costs us a mountain view.
Speaking of which it's time for a Snowdonian hill fort, I hope the crappy weather behaves.

Glyn (Burial Chamber) — Images

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Pant-y-Saer (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman<b>Pant-y-Saer</b>Posted by postman

Maen Pres (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

This great stone is a stone of two names Carreg Lefn, and Maen Pres the smooth or brass stone, this is another instance of the Welsh flexing their humorous muscles again, the stone is not smooth, by a long way, and it really aint made of brass, it just makes me shake my head in wonder the names they've given to some sites, or am I missing some now lost snippet of information that makes it all click into place. Parys mountain copper mine is a mile or two away east you need copper to make brass, that's all I've got.

It's such a good stone this one, tall, gnarly, covered in lichen and moss and standing proud but lonely in the middle of an empty field. I tried to pick out a stone I hadn't yet been to on Angelsey, but I failed, I'm not sure there are any left that I haven't had the pleasure of, there must be at least one.

Maen Pres (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Maen Pres</b>Posted by postman<b>Maen Pres</b>Posted by postman<b>Maen Pres</b>Posted by postman<b>Maen Pres</b>Posted by postman

Ty-Newydd (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

With Carls notes twinned with my own negative views and telling photo I can only suggest there isn't much need for anyone else to waste there time looking for this barrow, there are many more engaging stoney sites to go to, I only stopped because I was passing by.

Ty-Newydd (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Ty-Newydd</b>Posted by postman

Moel y Geifr (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Moel y Geifr</b>Posted by postman

Foel Fawr (Burial Chamber) — Fieldnotes

I've passed this site by almost a dozen times, it's collapsed and ruined and the current occupiers of this once sacred land demand that we ask to see it.
So I will reiterate the great Stubobs words "Get yourself over the gate", and like he I went dead early, earlier still. I thought for a minute of knocking on the door the way that postmen do, but reckoned this wasn't really what they had in mind, I've seen too many just got up grumpy faces, just doing my job.

So I parked some way away and walked back up the road and tip toed up the track to the farm buildings. No signs of life (well it is Wales) alerted me to farmers presence so I quietly climbed over the gate, if you go over by the hinges it makes less noise. Then a bee line to the stones, if all bees are a bit drunk. Stubobs analysis of the chamber is spot on, they are indeed a funny old jumble of stones, I think only the capstone is readily identifiable. I cant even tell if all the stones here are from the chamber, one big stone is earthfast outcrop, are they even in the same place, I doubted it.
Closer to the stones than the farm is the terminus of wires and pylons, it is without doubt a monstrosity, I can almost feel the mind control waves bashing around in my head, lucky for me i'm immune, probably the aneurysms.
Five minutes and I'm done, I think I got away with it.

Foel Fawr (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Foel Fawr</b>Posted by postman<b>Foel Fawr</b>Posted by postman
Showing 1-50 of 8,461 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
After visiting over a thousand ancient places and driving between fifteen to twenty thousand miles every year I can only conclude that I'm obsessed with these places, and finding this website ten years ago only compounded that obsession, at least I'm not alone anymore.

My favourite places are:

Ring of Brodgar
Callanish
Balnauran of Clava
Torhouskie
Swinside
Nine stones close
Bryn Celli Ddu
The Druids circle (penmaenmawr)
HafodyGors Wen
Gwal y Filiast
Grey Wethers
Boscawen Un
La Roche au Fees
Drombeg
Uragh
Talati De Dalt

and these are only the ones that immediatly spring to mind, so many stones and not enough lifetimes.

My TMA Content: