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Fingal's Rock (Natural Rock Feature) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Fingal's Rock</b>Posted by postman<b>Fingal's Rock</b>Posted by postman

Rowtor Rocks (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

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Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave) (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman<b>Cratcliff Rocks (Defended Settlements and Cave)</b>Posted by postman

Durwood Tor (Rocky Outcrop) — Images

<b>Durwood Tor</b>Posted by postman

Nine Stones Close (Stone Circle) — Images

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Standing Stone, Nine Stones Close (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Standing Stone, Nine Stones Close</b>Posted by postman<b>Standing Stone, Nine Stones Close</b>Posted by postman

Robin Hood's Stride (Rocky Outcrop) — Images

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Craig Cwm-Silyn (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Craig Cwm-Silyn</b>Posted by postman

Mynydd Mawr (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

I parked the car in the car park that's next to Llyn y Dywarchen, hoping to take a bit of a short cut, but we went the wrong way, turned right around the rock Clogwynygarreg instead of left, this took us into a very boggy area and we were forced to take a very circuitous route. But in the end we got to a place where we could see the route, just up a steep long winded slope from here.

In the distance before us there was a group of people, we aimed for them, they were on the path. By the time we got to where they were they had moved on up the path to the stile, a sit down later and we were on our way to the stile. Above the stile is Foel Rudd, a peak at the end of an arm coming off from Mynydd Mawr, it is high above us but 125 meters below the summit cairn. It was about here that I started to get really out of breath, and my legs got very heavy, it never used to be this hard. At the top of Foel Rudd the whole eastern side of the mountain opens out before us, Moel Eilio is from here just a stones throw from Craig Cwmbychan and it's cairn, that one we'll see later. Y Garn and the Nantlle ridge has opened out into the long and scary view that it is, the view to Snowdon across Llyn Cwellyn has been there all along dominating the view east.
After another short sit down we are making our way towards the still sitting walking group, which has turned out to be a group of women, huffing and puffing our way through their midst one of them comments upon my nice camera, but I'm too out of breath to utter anything more then uuuhuuhn in a thank you type noise, no energy to say she has a nice something or other, just enough energy to keep following Alken, one foot in front of the other.
The ground is now a wide ridge, on the right the ground falls away gently to Cwm Planwydd, but on the left Craig y Bera's cliffs of certain death drop straight down to the ground far far below, across that valley Y Garn rises up into a dome like massiff, it has two great cairns upon it, running off from those two cairns the Nantlle ridge runs off terrifyingly wonderful towards another cairn upon Craig Cwm Silyn.
Whilst we're looking over the cliffs of certain death, a woman joins us, we exchange pleasantries and move on some more, a woman on a mountain on her own ? not seen one of those before. It's really not far to the top from here, breathing has returned to normal and the legs have attained their normal weight.

Way up at the top and the cairn is before us, nobody else is up here yet, so we get a few photos in before every one else comes. The views are amazing, from the Lleyn peninsula to Caernarfon, which I mistakenly took to be Bangor, one can see a very long way in all directions, and it is a feast for the eye. The cairn has spread far and wide, but enough remains for numpties to have constructed three large but low shelters out of it. We pick one and have our butties, they don't even touch the sides. The lone woman has arrived and is now taking her own photos, a woman after my own heart, I wish. Then the group of women arrive and take over the largest of the shelters, then a mixed couple and then another, on our way down two more women pass us, is this a girl's mountain, 9 out of 10 walkers were women, you don't see that very often. How very refreshing.
The women have taken over the top of the mountain so we decide to take our leave, a few more photos and were off down the gentle slope to Craig Cwmbychan and it's good looking cairn.

Craig Cwmbychan (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

The walk down from Mynydd Mawr is very easy, just a summers strole down a gentle hill, contrasting highly with the walk up it. The cairn upon Craig Cwmbychan is visble from up on the higher summit, it was probably smaller than it's near neighbour, seeing as it's only been built into one shelter instead of three.
Standing back from the cairn in almost any direction you can almost kid yourself into believeing that it is still whole and full. But closer to and it has a small entrance into what would be very welcoming shelter from howling winds and sideways stingy face rain. But today the weather is behaving impeccably and the shelter is just a desacration, I almost want to push the stones in but I'm far too knackered, Alken is lying on his back and i'm sitting on a big flat stone of the cairn admiring the view.
The view is admirable, large and dark is the Snowdon massiff, across the valley is Moel Eilio, itself crowned by a large cairn, a ridge runs from Moel Eilio in the direction of Snowdon. Across the hill tops we can see the distant Carneddau and the peak of Tryfan. The cairns on Y Garn and the Nantlle ridge float ethereally above a low arm of Mynydd Mawr. Craig Cwmbychan cairn sits right on the edge of it's ridge, below it the ground gives way sharply down.
As good as this cairn is and as good as the view is it is still time to go, instead of making our way back up to Mynydd Mawr and going back the way we came, we struck off in a more direct route, going down at 45 degrees, through thick heather, large rocks, and hidden streams, it was not the right way at all.

Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

As soon as the A55 duel carriage way fully opened, North Wales got a whole lot closer, on a good day the Clwydian range is just an hour away, and Snowdonia another half hour. So you can imagine how many times Ive passed by within a hundred feet of this large barrow, but the short cut to it is fraut with many perils, consequently it's taken half my adult life to stop and run across the road for a quick look and go see.
To be fair there is a less dangerous route to it from the west by the roundabout and Cafe, but it is twice as far to walk as the short cut, the lazy git in me always prefers a short cut, there just so much shorter.
So, you come off the A55 at the Caerwys junction, like your heading for the Mcdonalds, but go past it (unless your hungry), and park on the left by an entrance to a small nature preserve. Cross over the road and jump the bramble ridden barbed wire topped fence into the field. Cross the field, going towards the A55, jump the fence and your next to the road, four lanes and a central barrier now need to be crossed. Here comes the peril, close your eyes tight shut, wait for the sound of racing cars to die down and run across waving yor hands wildly in the air. It's just an option.
As we waited for a brake in the traffic a police car went past and I wondered if this was legal, having made it safely to the other side another fence jump and were just fifty yards from the barrow.
It's a big barrow, sat upon a slight ridge overlooking the Vale of Clwyd and the highly forted mountain range there. It has a very good view to the south and a better one to the west.
If you stand in the right place the top of the barrow is a foot higher than me, and on the other side of it a foot shorter than me. If you stand on the top of the barrow you can see Mcdonalds.
There are many other barrows in the vicinty some up to three meters tall, some with ditches, some in bunches, and some in bushes. In the trees immediately south east is an ancient enlosure of undetermined (by Coflein) date.
I'll be back.

Ffrith-Y-Garreg-Wen (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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Penycloddiau (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

My first time here was slightly hampered by small children and knock 'em over winds, seven years later in thick sunshine I'm back for a full circuit, and a gander at that restored cairn. The walk from car to hill fort entrance is no more than fifteen minutes, it's all up and the views expand accordingly. The entrance to the fort isn't as impressive and imposing as the rest of the fort would suggest, that's mainly because it isn't the actual entrance, but rather the route of the Offas Dyke path. There are two entrances, both on the east side, so that's the route I take, counter clockwise. The single bank starts off quite low and mellow, steadfastly it follows the edge of the hill up and over hillocks and spurs, in one place a massive hollow is come across, but the bank carries on. But by the time I reach the only entrance I can say is definitely an entrance they have grown to at least six feet in height.
Some shenanigans have taken place here at the entrance, a massive strip of grass has been removed and covered in a wooden fence, laying horizontal over the scar, a big pile of plastic covered something has been placed in the inner ditch, from the rubble taken from the forts defences someone has created a small throne, shenanigans I tell you.
The walk along the eastern ramparts is now gaining in some more height, the views to the east are long but a bit flat and farmy, there are also two banks now. Wheeling in the far distant sky is a Red Kite, an unmistakeable silhouette against the deep blue of the sky, this is the farthest north I've seen them.
Now the north end of the fort has been achieved the ramparts have grown in number again, four there are now, and very good they look too covered in unusually bright pink heather, in fact, over half the fort is covered in pink heather. From here I can just see the trig point on Moel Y Parc, behind which is a barrow and a cairn, I'll have to go there one day and see if there's much difference between the two. I stop off here for a look at the restored cairn, and decide that it is a very loose restoration, it looks good but longevity has eluded it's restorers. Turning south I retrace the kids and mine steps from seven years ago, two large banks make it most of the journey down the west end, punctuated by a slight and possibly modern entrance with a stile, and some fairly convincing round house platforms. Then it's back up to the false entrance at the south end and the view beckons us on to the next hill fort over Moel Arthur, but I went up there not long ago and it's almost tea time ive gotta go. So I go.
This is a superb hill fort, one of the largest in Wales I suspect, and that cairn needs to be seen before it fades back into the well trodden hill top.
Showing 1-50 of 7,297 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
After visiting over a thousand ancient places and driving between fifteen to twenty thousand miles every year I can only conclude that I'm obsessed with these places, and finding this website seven years ago only compounded that obsession, at least I'm not alone anymore.

My favourite places are:

Ring of Brodgar
Callanish
Balnauran of Clava
Torhouskie
Swinside
Nine stones close
Bryn Celli Ddu
The Druids circle (penmaenmawr)
HafodyGors Wen
Gwal y Filiast
Grey Wethers
Boscawen Un
La Roche au Fees
Drombeg
Uragh
Talati De Dalt

and these are only the ones that immediatly spring to mind, so many stones and not enough lifetimes.

My TMA Content: