The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Dyffryn Mymbyr (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Gawton's Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

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Gawton's Well (Sacred Well) — Images

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Watchet Hill (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

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Llwyn Erddyn (Ring Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Coflein says this about the larger southern ring cairn.........
An oval penannular grassy ring bank measures overall 19.5m (N-S) by c.14m, open on the E where there is a gap 6m wide. The stony turfed-over bank has a maximum width of about 6m and an average height of c.0.5m. On the N part of the ring bank are set two small boulders, 2.5m apart, which appear to flank another gap though, in fact, the bank between them is only slightly lower than elsewhere. The interior is uneven.

and this about the smaller one.......
A slightly oval ring bank surrounding a sunken interior lies adjacent to a farm track.
The overall dimensions of the feature are 13m (N-S) by 12.2m, the interior 6.5m (N-S) by 6m. The crest of the stony turf-grown bank is 0.2m high above the exterior but 0.75m above the sunken interior. A small stony mound lies adjacent to the bank, on the NW.

Coflein also calls them possibles, but that they are bronze age funerary monuments.
Easier to find than I anticipated, though their not on any map but you'll still need an OS map though.
They are wildly different in size, the larger one is like many other ring cairns I've seen but the smaller one is, well, its very small, and that sunken interior. There are stones poking out of the grass where the smaller one abuts the farm track, weather they are part of the cairn or part of the road I couldn't say. This may be private property but I encountered no people and no barriers.

Llwyn Erddyn (Ring Cairn) — Images

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Plas Captain cairn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Parking was obtained on the B5121 to the north west of the cairn by the overgrown entrance to a footpath. But ignore the footpath and walk south down the road, then enter a field through the gate and walk across it, the cairn is in the next field. Its easy enough to get to with an OS map.

This is a good cairn, at least six feet high, made of white limestone like stones. Coflein says it has two trees growing on it, and there is a large boulder on it as well. Typically there are now more than two trees, and the boulder count has grown to three, though the other two are much smaller.

I was really impressed with this cairn, I was expecting it to be much flatter, and the biggest boulder must have taken some great effort to get it up there, effort taken by a tractor or something I presume.
En route back to the car I took a different route across a recently ploughed field, I found a stone that is too flat and smooth on one side and a stoneware jar, it is now on the kitchen window with some small Naffodils in it.

150 meters east are two ring cairns, to where I'm off to next.

Plas Captain cairn (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Coed Bron Fawr (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

With your shiny Ordnance survey map these two barrows should be very easy to find despite the densely packed trees, they are only ten yards from the side of the road and one of the barrows is helpfully massive, three meters high.

Coflein says........
The larger of a pair of barrows (see also Nprn306939), 23m NW-SE - 26m in diameter and 3.0m high, truncated by a modern field boundary on the SE.
Upon opening, in 1908, the mound revealed a central collection of calcined human and animal bones, a possibly secondary in-urned cremation and a further deposit of animal bones and sherds.
and,
the lesser of a pair of barrows (see also Nprn306938), greatly mutilated, 16-17m in diameter and c.1.0m high. A NW-SE trench has been driven through the mound.

I would only add, oh the trees, the god damn trees.

Coed Bron Fawr (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

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Pant Ifan (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

Coflein says....
A round barrow, 14m in diameter and 1.3m high, excavated 1899, producing a possibly disturbed cremation.
I will add just a few things. South east a few hundred yards is Coed Bron Fawr barrow, 3 meters high.
A couple hundred yards west is what looks like another barrow, but Coflein assures us it is a garden feature, nudge, nudge.
If not for the trees on the west side of the road the barrow would enjoy a good view if the Clwydian range.
Grassy mound in field.

Pant Ifan (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

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Coed Gaer (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

I came across this place on the portal, and couldn't quite believe that such a place could go entirely overlooked by us. So I remedied this immediately, give or take six months.
It's no wonder we'd never heard of it , it's not on any map, but, of course my mate Coflein knew all about it. this is what he said.....
Hut circle measuring 8m diameter internally defined by a 1.5m wide bank faced with orthostatic limestone slabs up to 1m high. There are two opposed entrances, on the E and W, each flanked by orthostats, on the N and S sides respectively.
A line of orthostats to the immediate NW of the circle runs NE-SW
At SH 80008092, to the NE of the above, is a small depression, possibly a second hut or pond but more likely a quarry hollow.

Two entrances? in a round house? not heard of that before, ever.

There is no where good to park. I'd Google street viewed the area so I knew I was there when I got there, but it didn't help with parking, the small road only leads to three houses, all with Private property no parking signs. So I decided to be equally as helpful and took up half a passing place. It was at the top of the road and it's not like there's even enough traffic to warrant a passing place, so there you are.
Eric and me had been laid up all weekend with the mother of all colds and neither of us was back on top form. So we hobbled off, well overdressed for the weather in the direction of the trees that hide this little known wonder of Llandudno.
We were not on a footpath, and after we'd climbed over the wall I'm not at all sure if we were trespassing or not. Like it's ever mattered to me.

There was a path on the other side of the wall, and parallel to it, sheltered by wind twisted Beech trees (I think) the effect was to simultaneously be afraid of and in awe of the woods. Such feelings are often evoked in these places.
Then, through the trees, I spied some stones, we headed for them despite not knowing if these were them, they were them.

Now I am here I am even more surprised that no ones been here before. This is much better than most of North Wales hut circles, this is more like Dartmoor.
Some of the bigger stones are at least a meter high, and it looks like it's got two entrances, east and west, but not directly opposite each other, I dismissed it as missing stones, but Coflein says looks aint deceiving, two entrances. That could get drafty.

In the centre of the circle is a campfire spot, (probably right on top of the iron age hearth)often used it seems, but there's not much litter so the midnight revellers at least clean up after them selves.
I saw the line of stones heading away north east, and I saw the hollow that is most probably a small quarry, but they're gnats on a dinosaurs behind here, the hut circle is really very good.

Coed Gaer (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

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Showing 1-50 of 7,557 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
After visiting over a thousand ancient places and driving between fifteen to twenty thousand miles every year I can only conclude that I'm obsessed with these places, and finding this website seven years ago only compounded that obsession, at least I'm not alone anymore.

My favourite places are:

Ring of Brodgar
Callanish
Balnauran of Clava
Torhouskie
Swinside
Nine stones close
Bryn Celli Ddu
The Druids circle (penmaenmawr)
HafodyGors Wen
Gwal y Filiast
Grey Wethers
Boscawen Un
La Roche au Fees
Drombeg
Uragh
Talati De Dalt

and these are only the ones that immediatly spring to mind, so many stones and not enough lifetimes.

My TMA Content: