The Modern Antiquarian. Ancient Sites, Stone Circles, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic Mysteries

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Cefyn y Castell (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Breiddin Hill Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Breiddin Hill Camp</b>Posted by postman

Hendre Waelod (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Hendre Waelod</b>Posted by postman

Cerrig-y-Ddinas (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

It's been a long time coming has this, there's so many sites to see and frankly I just don't get as many chances to get out like this as I once did. I can remember getting out stone hunting at least three times a week, no weather too dismal, any time of day or night, no where too far, always throwing caution to the wind. Not any more. So, when everything comes together, sunshine, money and free time in the right place, it is exceedingly gratifying.

I parked by the 12th century church of St Celynnin, put me boots on, slung my camera over my shoulder left my window wound down and walked off across the field to the church.Oops.
The information board at the Lords house declares it as one of Conwy's best kept secrets, I don't know about it being very secret but it is in a very lovely place, it brings out a feeling of reverence in me that I like, it does not come upon me often, indifference and disappointment are my constant bed fellows. Getting out among the hills and ancient structures are a cure, and I swallow the medicine happily.

From the church a short ten minute walk north east brings one to the feet of the rocky island, there is a path for those who follow such things, I as ever made my own way there. From below the outcrop to the right I can make out a low wall with a gap in it, sheep does as she was bidden and goes the way I pointed. Then I follow her up into the settlement.
Determining the age of the low wall, and indeed all of the walling here is extremely difficult, Stewart Ainsworth from time team could no doubt make more sense out of it all than I could. So I just make my way up to the top of the rocks, the highest point is a small walled enclosure of undetermined date about twenty yards across. A small linear outcrop has a basin carved into one end, and the outcrop leads past a large boulder and down into the lower level. I just cant make out what is ancient and what is natural or what is modern so I give up, I'll take lots of pictures and folk can make up there own mind, should they posses one.
For now I am content to simply park my behind down on the high boulder at the top, legs swinging childishly over the edge. It is a truly wondrous view, as good as it gets on this little island. I try to make out where the burial chamber Hendre Waolod is, down in the fields across the river, behind me Tal y Fan rears it's 2001 foot high peak, but north west is my next target for the day, I could of coarse spend the whole day here, quite happily. But then I'd be disappointed in not seeing the other places. So I leave, on the way down I stumble a touch and nearly fall head first down the rocky slope, is it Cerrig Y Ddinas having a go for not staying longer, now that's anthropomorphising.

Several hours later I return to the car, and find all is well, nothing of report here, you don't get that down in the valleys.

Cerrig-y-Ddinas (Hillfort) — Images

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Hafodty Circle (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

For Directions see Hafodty standing stone next door.

It is just a short five minute walk down the track from standing stone to stone circle, the track passes right through the circle, having as much effect upon it as a light wind brushing through a wintry tree. Three stones are up standing, and three fallen, one of the fallen was becoming consumed by a brutal gorse bush, but excessive stamping has freed it somewhat. Though I'm not sure which three stones are the fallen, the big split stone is I think too bulky and out of place to be a circle stone, but the fallen stone nearest the biggest standing stone is too close to it to be in place.
Walking round the circle at a distance I could see that the stones are on an artificial platform, walking round the place looking at it from as many angles as possible is the thing to do, placing it in it's landscape, and all that. Most enjoyable.
The views are most enjoyable too, I particularly like the scene down past Conwy castle to Bryn Euryn hill fort.

Wow! a stone circle with no field notes, shit, what am I going to say....... I played with fairies here then went on a trip in a flying saucer after we had tea with the Queen of inner earth. Come to Hafodty stone circle and see if you experience anything ......untoward.

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

From Henryd, the small lanes heading east and uphill are only just navigable, they are tight and often steep covered with leaves and the odd slow moving tractor, they can be tricky for those not used to such places.
Basically, it's straight east from Henryd, ignore right turn take the right fork, straight on ignore next right, then take next right again, go up here, all the way baby.
The standing stone is in the field beyond the one on your right, north. If you've got better eyes than me you might be able to spot it from the end of the lane.
You could now jump the fence and the next wall and you'd be there, in the same field as the stone, but it's not easy getting over the wall. Better following the path, which is easy to find and to follow. But it still isn't that easy to reach, over a gate and then one wall, whilst all the time keeping an eye out for the good sir farmer. Who was out and about screaming at his sheep as they blithely went the wrong way.

Upon entering the stones field I hunkered down in a corner and waited for farmer to get off his land, or at least further away from me, duly, he did as I wished and I strolled over to this lovely stone. There are many shapes a standing stone can take, this is the tall, slender, smooth, and circular-ish in plan type(bar one straight side). It has stripes on it too, from rubbing ruminants.
This is a brilliant stone, perfect in shape, a tall phallic missile. At the big stones foot is a smaller stone, much smaller, it is a dead ringer now for Menhir de Champ-Dolent in Brittany ( http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/9945/menhir_de_champdolent.html ) it's just missing a few feet.
Something just has to be said about the view from the stone, It's just on the edge of Snowdonia national park, so as you'd expect it's not a bad view, as they go. West goes up hill so not much there, North is Conwy, river, town and castle. East is down in to the often misty Conwy river valley, and south is the profile of Cerrig Y Ddinas defensible hill top enclosure, and Tal y Fan.

A totally fabulous site, with lots of other nearby little beauties.

Waen Gyrach (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

Coflein's Site Description
The site consists of three closely associated funerary monuments. There is a ring cairn to the east, which measures approximately 15m in diameter and includes an earth and stone bank. There are 18 large stones in the bank, and it is denuded on the western side. In the centre of the bank, there is a mutilated cairn consisting of small to medium, sub-round stones and it measures no more than 0.3m high. To the west, there is a kerbed cairn measuring approximately 6m in diameter. It has large stones on the edge and small to medium round stones in the centre. To the south, there is a spoil heap. The final monument is a cist burial, which lies to the south-west. There is a flattened round capping stone to one side and the cist has been cut into the natural outcropping. In addition, there are the possible remnants of a cairn to the south.

Wow, really ? all that ?

Tydden-Grasod (Cist) — Miscellaneous

Sourced from Coflein....

The remains of a cist found during field investigations. Orientated wnw-ese; it measures 1.4m x 1m. There is no trace of a capstone. The cist consists of slabs laid end to end with a single slab at each end.

Llyn Y Wrach (Ring Cairn) — Images

<b>Llyn Y Wrach</b>Posted by postman

Llyn Y Wrach (Ring Cairn) — Miscellaneous

Coflein says........
A large ring of stones, circa 12m in diameter with wall circa 1.5m wide comprising large flat upright orthostats with an entrance at the south-west, marked by large orthostats and facing out on to the natural slope of the ground.

Postman says.......
I couldn't find it.
But, my optimistic penned in dot on the map was not quite in the right place. Now upon my return home ive found other cists and kerb cairns very close by so I will return soon, maybe on the winter solstice.

Bryn Euryn (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Bryn Euryn</b>Posted by postman

Hafodty Circle (Stone Circle) — Images

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Tal-y-Fan — Images

<b>Tal-y-Fan</b>Posted by postman

Hafodty (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

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Glenquicken (Stone Circle) — Images

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Glenquicken Cist — Images

<b>Glenquicken Cist</b>Posted by postman<b>Glenquicken Cist</b>Posted by postman
Showing 1-50 of 7,390 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
After visiting over a thousand ancient places and driving between fifteen to twenty thousand miles every year I can only conclude that I'm obsessed with these places, and finding this website seven years ago only compounded that obsession, at least I'm not alone anymore.

My favourite places are:

Ring of Brodgar
Callanish
Balnauran of Clava
Torhouskie
Swinside
Nine stones close
Bryn Celli Ddu
The Druids circle (penmaenmawr)
HafodyGors Wen
Gwal y Filiast
Grey Wethers
Boscawen Un
La Roche au Fees
Drombeg
Uragh
Talati De Dalt

and these are only the ones that immediatly spring to mind, so many stones and not enough lifetimes.

My TMA Content: