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Steinkimmen 3 (Passage Grave)

Steinkimmen 3 is only for the completist, as it is heavily destroyed and just a few stones are all that remains.

To reach the site, turn right immediatly after you left the Kümmerlandstraße into Bergedorfer Landstraße. Park you car here and walk left along a field track towards a row of trees for about 250m, after you reach the trees continue on that track for another 250m. The tomb is on the left, just before you reach a pond.

Visited July 2018

Steinkimmen 1 (Passage Grave)

About northeast of Steinkimmen 2 lies Steinkimmen 1, which is relatively heavily destroyed, but you can still see the shape of the 18 m long northwest-southeast oriented burial chamber. One of the two preserved capstones is very large and is located at the eastern end slipped off in front of the tomb.

Steinkimmen 1 is station 32b of the Straße der Megalithkultur and is signposted from Steinkimmen 2.

Visited July 2018

Steinkimmen 2 (Passage Grave)

This is the best preserved of the three megalithic tombs here in Steinkimmen. It is station 32a of the Straße der Megalithkultur and is located directly on a parking space on the road to Bergedorf.

Although only one capstone has been preserved in original position, the 23 x 2 m large chamber is still impressive. Almost all supporting stones are preserved, also the two endstones of the narrow sides. Well preserved and marked by four supporting stones is the access to the chamber. From the oval enclosure only 14 stones are visible.

Visited July 2018

Dingstede Thingstätte

Dingstede, situated on the western boundary of the municipality of Ganderkesee, was first mentioned as "Thingenstede" in a document of the Hude Monastery from 1249. Accordingly, the origin of the place name Dingstede comes from at a court site (Thingstätte = thing site), which is often associated with a megalithic grave of the same name destroyed at the end of the 18th century. Whether the archaeological site was actually a court site is unclear. In any case, in 1973 a replica of just this thing site was built on the outskirts of Dingstede.

It is located west of Dingstede at the "Alter Postweg" road to Munderloh.

Visited July 2018

Hatten 2 (Passage Grave)

Hatten 2 aka "Steenberg" lies southeast of Sandhatten and is station 31 of the Straße der Megalithkultur so it is signposted and even has its own parking space. Drive from Sandhatten to Ostrittum and follow the signs, from the parking space it is a walk of about 700m around fields to the tomb, which lies under old oak trees.

The tomb is an approximately east-west oriented chamber of 16.3 x 2.0 meters dimension. Nearly all supporting stones are still present, only two are missing. Six capstones or parts of them are lying within the chamber. From the oval border some stones are still preserved.

Visited July 2018

taken from the "Faszination Archäologie" information board:

"Steenberg"

The approximately east-west oriented grave chamber has a relatively good state of preservation. Their supporting stones are almost completely extant, half even in their original position. Only on each long sides the loss of one stone is recorded. Also visible are six capstones plunged into the chamber or their remains. From the narrow oval enclosure, however, only fragments have survived.

Testimony of sedentary life
Megalithic tombs like "Steenberg" (stone hill) are considered the oldest surviving structures of northern Central Europe. Until the fourth millennium BC only hunters and gatherers lived in the Wildeshauser Geest. Only the "funnel beaker culture" (about 3500 - 2700 BC) settled down permanently.

They bred cattle, planted grain and lived in post constructions. Presumably, they believed in an otherworldly life and therefore built their deceased sometimes monumental graves of boulders. Those megalithic graves or megalithic tombs (Greek: mega = large, lithos = stone) were erected not for individuals, but for groups and used over many generations.

Hatten 1

Only six scattered stones are all that remains from this megalithic tomb. It lies in the southwest of the village Sandhatten. If you drive from Huntlosen to Sandhatten turn left into the road Haferkampstraße and continue for about 150m, the tomb lies northeast of the road on a private field. According to Sprockhoff, the tomb was originally about 12m long.

Visited July 2018

Huntlosen 1

Despite the fact the this megalithic tomb is signed from the road "Zum Döhler Wehe", a visit is only recommended for the really enthusiastic (but I think there are some here on this website ;-) ) as the tomb is heavily destroyed and overgrown. You'll find the tomb if you drive from Huntlosen on the K337 westward to Hengstlage. About 2.5km behind Huntlosen turn left into "Zum Döhler Wehe" drive for another 725m and park at N52° 59' 01.8" E8° 14' 30.3". There is a track which leads roughly soutwest around a field, after 100m the track turn westwards and after additional 380m a tracks leads north into the wood (there is also a sign for the tomb). After 90m into the wood, the tomb lies to the right.

As I said, the tomb is heavily destroyed, only some of the supporting stones and a end stone survived, none of the capstones. Also the heavy vegetation prevents a clearer view of the site. According to the information baord the original size was about 14 x 2m. There are some grave mounds in this area as well.

Visited July 2018

taken from the "Faszination Archäologie" information board:

Neolithic tomb

The megalithic tomb was exposed early to human destruction. Today it is one of the less well-preserved Neolithic tombs of the Wildeshauser Geest. The remaining stones nevertheless give an idea of the original layout.

Testimony of sedentary life
Megalithic tombs are considered the oldest surviving structures of northern Central Europe. Until the fourth millennium BC only hunters and gatherers lived in the Wildeshauser Geest. Only the "funnel beaker culture" (about 3500 - 2700 BC) settled down permanently.

They bred cattle, planted grain and lived in post constructions. Presumably, they believed in an otherworldly life and therefore built their deceased sometimes monumental graves of boulders. Those megalithic graves or megalithic tombs (Greek: mega = large, lithos = stone) were erected not for individuals, but for groups and used over many generations.

Düste (Passage Grave)

In the fall of 1984, large stones that disturbed plowing on a field near Düste were to be removed. It turned out that these were the remains of a megalithic grave, which were immediately examined by an official excavation. Unfortunately, the chamber had been ransacked earlier by grave robbers, but it still found remains of 60 clay pots, an arrowhead and a stone ax.

The tomb was then transferred to the northwest edge of Barnstorf to the Walsener ponds, whereby not only supporting and cover stones, but also the soil paving were restored. A shattered stone was replaced by a foreign stone, the original fragments are still next to the chamber. The chamber measures 5.2 x 1.5 m inside. Of the original four capstones only two are preserved.

Visited July 2018

Damme 3

Damme 3 lies about 4km north northeast of Damme in the forest Dammer Fuhrenkamp, south of Stappenberg. To reach the tomb, drive the road L846 from Damme to Steinfeld (Oldenburg). About 3.5km after Damme turn right in the Eichenallee and follow this road for about 1.2km, partly on a unpaved road.

The 32-meter-long chamber must once have been magnificent, today it is heavily destroyed and plundered. The stones are mixed up and you can identify seven capstones or the remains of them. A stone on the south side of the tomb has a noticeable row of drillholes.

Visited July 2018

Damme 2 (Passage Grave)

Southwest of Damme in the Clemens-August-Dorf north of the L846 on both sides of the branching K277 (to Ossenbeck) two passage graves are located: Damme 1 and Damme 2. You can use the car park of the cemetery Kommunaler Friedhof Neuenwalde to visit both sites. To visit Damme 1 you must walk about 550m from the car park, Damme 2 lies actually within the cemetry.

Damme 2 is very poorly preserved and lies close to the entrance of the cemetry, probably the only megelithic tomb which is located within a cemetry. There are no signs or an information board which guides you to the tomb. You can still see some of the supporting stone and capstones and rests of the mound, but the overall structure or shape is hard to imagine. The tomb was according to Sprockhoff originally almost 30 meters long. Its remains are still 19 meters long and about 1.6 meters wide. The end stone to the west is present, the eastern missing.

Visited July 2018

Damme 1 (Passage Grave)

Southwest of Damme in the Clemens-August-Dorf north of the L846 on both sides of the branching K277 (to Ossenbeck) two passage graves are located: Damme 1 and Damme 2. You can use the car park of the cemetery Kommunaler Friedhof Neuenwalde to visit both sites. To visit Damme 1 you must walk about 550m from the car park, Damme 2 lies actually within the cemetry.

From the car park of the cemetry walk along the exit and you reach the road K277. Across the road a trail starts (look for a big sign) which brings you directly to the tomb.

Damme 1 is a well preserved passage grave and worth seeing, magically surround by trees in a small clearing in the woods. The width is 3 meters in the middle, it tapers to 2.5 meters at the east end and 2 meters at the west end. All eleven supporting stones and four really impressive capstones are still present. Only one of the capstones has slipped into the chamber, the others are still lying on the support stones. On the south side a single stone probably marks the entrance.

Highly recommended, if you are in the area!

Visited July 2018

Wechte I (Allee-Couverte)

The gallery grave Wechte I lies south of the Bodelschwing church, a small unpaved road (An der Papiermühle) leads from the Brochterbecker Straße, where there is a sign, in about 60m directly to the tomb.

The tomb lies on a green meadow surrounded by hedges, behind some houses. The tomb is quite impressive (35 x 2.5m), according to the information board it was once at least 40m long (probably on the northeast side, as there is an end stone in the southwest section.

All in all a very nice tomb and due to the easy accessibility highly recommended, if you are in the part of the country.

Visited July 2018

Text taken from the information board:

Discovered by accident

During sand harvesting in 1928 a hitherto unknown megalithic grave was touched and then and dug out. At that time the approximately 2.5 m wide grave was still preserved on a length of about 35 m. Originally it must have been at least 40 meters long. The megalithic grave Langerich-Wechte I is one of the oldest and prehistoric relics of our region still visible in the area.

The formerly mounded burial chamber served in the period from 3400 to 2850 BC a rural community as a collective burial ground. It was built by the farmers, who were based in the Münsterland area. In addition to agriculture and livestock, hunting, fishing and gathering wild fruits and nuts supplemented the food supply. Settlements of this time are not yet known from the immediate vicinity of the megalithic grave, but in the area Heek, county Borken, remains of the then wooden houses were discovered.

At the time of the excavation, the stone-paved chamber floor was still intact. However, the larger granite and Osning sandstone blocks of the side walls and the ceiling had previously either pulled out or sunk deeper into the ground to allow for agricultural use of the area. Occasionally, dry masonry from flat rocks filled the up to 1 m wide gaps between the supporting stones. Access to the burial chamber could not be clearly determined during the archaeological examination, it was perhaps from a narrow side.
In addition to numerous human bones, the excavations revealed the remains of several hundred ornate pottery vessels of the funnel beaker culture, several flint and rock axes, weapons and tools made of flint and bone and jewelry made of amber, quartz, gagat and copper.

The site of Lengerich-Wechte is one of the most southerly examples of the megalithic tombs spread over the northern German-Scandinavian area.

After completion of the excavations 1928, the state was preserved and some of the remaining supporting stones set up again. In addition, some of the stones of a second destroyed megalithic tomb about 800 meters southwest were used for the reconstruction.


Visited July 2018

Hilter (Chambered Tomb)

Hilter is located in a small park behind the town hall of Hilter, close to the road Zum Schoppenbusch.

The already completely destroyed grave was first discovered in 1902 and scientifically examinied. During the next years the exact location was unknown, that's why it it took until 1982, when the grave was rediscovered. The excavation showed that the tomb was oriented east-west and trapezoidal. The length was 15 m, the width was between 2.7 m and 4 m.

The architecture of the tomb is quite unusual. Its walls consisted of boulders and dry stone masonry, as was the case with the northern megalithic tombs. Of these boulder eight were preserved. In the eastern part, however, was a transverse row of four broken limestone slabs, which divided the interior of the tomb into a pre- and main chamber. Such an architectural element is more typical of the gallery graves of the Hessian-Westphalian megalithic. The plant in Hilter thus represents a mixed or transitional form between the northern passage graves and the gallery graves further south.

After the last excavation the tomb was reconstructed about 300m away from its original location. Although the orientation and location of the entrance correspond to the original layout, the number and size of the stones in the reconstruction does not properly match the excavation findings and only a little amount of the original building material was reused.

Visited July 2018

Kirchborchen II (Allee-Couverte)

From the A33, take the Borchen exit south of Paderborn and drive towards Borchen. Now coming from the south, after about 400m you will reach a junction with the road An den Steinkisten. To get to the tomb turn right here and you'll find the tomb after about 50m to your left. Kirchborchen I lies about 120m to the northwest.

Kirchenborch II is the better preserved tomb, at least you can recognize the shape and structure. The tomb it is about 15m long and 4m wide, inside the tomb two clusters of trees certainly contributed to the destruction of the tomb. According to the information board, there is a port-hole ("Seelenloch") in the northeast, but it is hardly visible because a stone slab was laid in front of it.

Visited July 2018

Text taken from the information board:

Prehistoric Stone-chamber tomb Kirchborchen II.

This stone chamber tomb was built in the Neolithic period (about 2500-2000 BC) by the local rural population as a community grave.

The burial chamber was originally topped with stone slabs and covered by a mound (image). The access to the chamber was on the southeastern long side of the chamber. It had the form of an oval, out of two stone slabs worked out port-hole [in German "Seelenloch"].

As excavations have shown, several generations of dead were buried in such chambers by a clan or settlement community with their grave goods - food, drinks, jewelry, weapons and tools.

The impulses for the construction of the stone-chamber tombs of the "Hercynian type" came from southern and western Europe, especially the French Seine area, where there are numerous models of the same type.

Kirchborchen I (Allee-Couverte)

From the A33, take the Borchen exit south of Paderborn and drive towards Borchen. Now coming from the south, after about 400m you will reach a junction with the road An den Steinkisten. To get to the tomb Kirchborchen I, turn left here. The road makes a right bend and about 75 meters later, as soon as the first houses appear on the right-hand side, the tomb is located about 30m to the right. Kirchborchen II lies about 120m to the southeast.

Unfortunately the tomb is heavily overgrown, only the last remaining capstone, which is collapsed into the tomb, is clearly visible. All other leftover stones, which are buried in the ground, can only be seen to some extent, which is a shame. So you have to rely on the information board and the drawings of the tomb to get an idea, how the tomb might have looked like. I read somewhere, that the chamber is orientated northeast-southwest and that it is about 21m long and 3m wide.

Visited July 2018

Text from the information board:

Cultural monument
Prehistoric Stone-chamber tomb
Kirchborchen I

This stone chamber tomb was built in the Neolithic period (about 2500-2000 BC) by the local rural population as a community grave.

The burial chamber was originally topped with stone slabs and covered by a mound (image 1 a-b). The access to the chamber was on the southeastern long side of the chamber. It had the form of an oval, out of two stone slabs worked out port-hole [in German "Seelenloch"] (image 2).

As excavations have shown, several generations of dead were buried in such chambers by a clan or settlement community with their grave goods - food, drinks, jewelry, weapons and tools.

The impulses for the construction of the stone-chamber tombs of the "Hercynian type" came from southern and western Europe, especially the French Seine area, where there are numerous examples of the same type.
Showing 1-20 of 121 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 20
During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

My TMA Content: