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<b>West Yorkshire</b>Posted by AlchemillaThe Twelve Apostles of Ilkley Moor © Alchemilla
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Web searches for West Yorkshire

Sites in this group:

22 posts
7 sites
Baildon Moor
2 posts
Barwick in Elmet Hillfort
4 posts
Bent Head Cup Marked Stone
Blackheath Barrow Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Blackheath Circle Enclosure
13 posts
Bradup Stone Circle
11 posts
Bull Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Butternab Camp, Crosland Hill Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
2 posts
Castlestead Ring Enclosure
28 posts
Castle Hill (Huddersfield) Hillfort
1 post
Castle Hill (Ingbirchworth) Hillfort
8 posts
Catstones Ring Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
9 posts
Churn Milk Joan Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Cock Crowing Stone Natural Rock Feature
2 sites
Counter Hill (Addingham) Enclosure
4 posts
Devil's Footprint Stone Natural Rock Feature
3 posts
Dove Stones Natural Rock Feature
9 posts
Fairy Stone (Cottingley) Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
12 posts
Ferrybridge Henge Henge
2 posts
Ferrybridge Timber Circles Timber Circle
16 posts
Great Bride Stones Natural Rock Feature
13 posts
The Grey Stone Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
7 posts
Harden Moor Stone Circle
1 post
Hippins Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Honley Old Wood Cairnfield Cairn(s)
4 posts
Horsforth Low Hall Cup and Ring stone Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
5 posts
Knotties Stone (Otley Chevin) Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
4 posts
Midgley Moor Standing Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Miller's Grave Burial Chamber
1 post
The Old Bull Ring Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
1 post
Pin Stone Standing Stone / Menhir (Destroyed)
4 posts
Plague Stone (Adel) Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
3 posts
4 sites
Ringstone Edge Moor
6 posts
Robin Hood's Penny Stone Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Robin Hood's Stone (Kirklees) Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Rocking Stone, Warley Moor Natural Rock Feature
81 posts
67 sites
Rombald's Moor
1 post
Silver Hill Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Slate Pit Wood Cairnfield Cairn(s)
8 posts
South Kirkby Hillfort
3 posts
Standing Stone Hill Standing Stone / Menhir
13 posts
The Stones Standing Stones
4 posts
Sutcliffe Rough Standing Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
81 posts
The Twelve Apostles of Ilkley Moor Stone Circle
1 post
Upwood Hall Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
18 posts
Walshaw Dean Stone Circle
2 posts
Wicken Hill Enclosure
10 posts
Witch's Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
Sites of disputed antiquity:
6 posts
Crosland Moor Holy Well Sacred Well
6 posts
Grey Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Horsforth Milestone Cup Marked Stone
5 posts
Mount Cross Christianised Site
3 posts
PRAWR 208 (Adel) Carving

News

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Archaeologists find 'tomb of tribal king' hidden on moor


http://www.wharfedaleobserver.co.uk/news/8410078.Archaeologists_find____tomb_of_tribal_king____hidden_on_moor/


Wharfedale and Airedale observer... continues...
Posted by Arcturus
28th September 2010ce
Edited 28th September 2010ce

Record of monuments will be created for future generations


From the Telegraph and Argus....

Work is underway to compile the first comprehensive record of ancient monuments on Ilkley Moor.

Archaeologists have started a three-year project to photograph rock carvings across Rombalds Moor and will use state-of-the-art technology to produce 3-D images of the stones... continues...
moss Posted by moss
6th August 2010ce

Ritual Landscapes - Photographic Exhibition

A free exhibition of large format colour and monochrome images of Megalithic sites by Steve Francis at Artsmill Gallery in Hebden Bridge. The exhibition runs between Wednesday 22nd August and Sunday 23rd September 2007.

For further information visit http://www.artsmill.org/ or telephone 01422 843413.

Sorry there is currently no disabled access.
Posted by photosteve
22nd August 2007ce
Edited 24th August 2007ce

Fieldnotes

Add fieldnotes Add fieldnotes
Small desolate moor to the West of Halifax, above Mytholmroyd. Much evidence of ancient habitation, but little charted on OS map. There are three bronze age enclosures to the south of Crow Hill which I have yet to confidently find.
You can park on the roadside in Midgely or walk up from Mytholmroyd Station
daveyravey Posted by daveyravey
20th January 2004ce
Edited 25th August 2013ce

Links

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Calderdale Councils list of SAMs


A list of Scheduled Ancient Monuments in the Calderdale District
daveyravey Posted by daveyravey
17th February 2004ce
Edited 25th August 2013ce

Latest posts for West Yorkshire

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Ferrybridge Timber Circles — Miscellaneous

Details of site on Pastscape

West Yorkshire Archaeology Service, undertaking a phased programme of survey and excavation to study and record the threatened landscape setting of Ferrybridge Henge, excavated two circles of pits at SE 475 241 (LO). The pit circles were found outside and to the south-east of the Ferrybridge Henge (SE 42 SE 31). Both pit circles measured around 16m in diameter, and had a central post-pit; they were formed by 13 and 14 post settings. (1)
Chance Posted by Chance
28th December 2014ce

Ferrybridge Henge — Miscellaneous

Details of henge on Pastscape

[SE 474242] Circular soil mark, average diameter 180m with a possible entrance to the SW. Possible a henge, comparable in size and situation with the Thornborough circles 36 miles to the NW [SE 27 NE 4]. (1)
Surveyed at 1/2500. This feature lies mainly in two ploughed fields and is visible as a circular bank of very slight profile, now considerably spread by cultivation and partly destroyed by the cutting of a new road. Two slight depressions in the bank to NE and SW probably indicate original opposed entrances, both of which are now bisected by a modern track. APs show markings of an outer ditch in the NW quadrant which is visible on the ground as a superficial depression, but is not surveyable. The interior of the enclosure has a slightly domed appearance, which is probably caused by the ploughing out of an internal ditch. The earthwork has all the characteristics of Atkinson's Class IIa 'Henge', thus favouring its comparison with the Thornborough Circles. (2)
In May 1992 the RCHME: Ferrybridge Henge Project recorded the cropmark of a circular henge ditch, 10m in width, at SE 4746 2424. The ditch has opposed entrances to the ENE and WSW; both east and west terminals of the southern arc are clearly defined, but those of the northern arc are slighted by a farm track. The maximum width of the causeway entrances is estimated as 20m for the ENE and 30m for the WSW. Concentric with the ditch and outside it, a bank approximately 15m wide, also has opposed entrances. Both entrance terminals are recorded on the WSW, and on the ENE that of the southern arc only (the NE quadrant of the bank is now destroyed). Between the inner ditch and the henge bank is a berm approximately 25m wide. Outside the bank is an ill-defined ditch, maximum width 26m, which is recorded on all sides except in the destroyed NE quadrant; this would confirm the previous classification by Authority 2 of a Class IIa Henge. A previous air photo transcription omits the outer ditch (3a). The internal diameter of the henge measures 100-102m; the external diameter of the henge measures 240-260m. The cropmark of a ring ditch (SE 42 SE 61) occupies the full width of the berm at SE 4748 2418, in the SSE sector of the henge. The relationship between the ring ditch and the henge is not clear. A full report and a plan can be found in the NMR archive (Coll UID 922907). West Yorkshire Archaeology Service is undertaking a phased programme of survey and excavation to study and record the threatened landscape setting of the henge monument (3b). Excavation in 1991 of a section across the henge earthwork also confirmed the presence of an outer ditch and revealed details of the bank's construction. (3) SE 474 246. Earthwork W of Ferrybridge. Scheduled No WY/720. (4)
Cropmark/soilmark remains of the henge at Ferrybridge were recorded as partof a 1:2500 scale aerial photographic survey carried out by the RCHME between 6th and 9th June 1997 as part of the RCHME: Industry and Enclosure in the Neolithic project. The plan of the henge and surrounding features, digital files and report are held by the RCHME (Collection UID: 1082880). (5)
The henge at Ferrybridge is visible as cropmarks and slight earthworks on air photographs. It has been recorded as part of a 1:10000 scale aerial photographic survey carried out by the Lower Wharfedale NMP project. The henge is as described by previous authorities. The ring ditch of the barrow that is located within the henge (described by authority 3 and also in SE 42 SE 61) has also been plotted as part of this survey. For the sake of clarity all the features associated with the henge shall be described in records SE 42 SE 132 and SE 42 SE 133.
(8-9)
Chance Posted by Chance
28th December 2014ce

Castle Hill (Huddersfield) (Hillfort) — Links

Castle Hill & Victoria Tower History


A detailed history of this historic Huddersfield landmark, from its inception in 1849.
Posted by huddshist
17th August 2014ce

Castle Hill (Ingbirchworth) (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Visited 30.4.14

Directions:
From Holmfirth take the A635 east. Then take the A629 south.
The site is marked as ‘earthwork’ on the O/S map – a short distance west of High Flatts.


Called in for a look after visiting Sid’s Café in Holmfirth (you just have to!)

There is nothing to see.

Go and see Nora’s and Compo’s house instead!
Posted by CARL
6th May 2014ce

The Idol Stone (Cup Marked Stone) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>The Idol Stone</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
23rd January 2014ce

Barwick in Elmet (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Barwick in Elmet</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
29th April 2013ce

Barwick in Elmet (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

This is a rather interesting site, because the layout of the Iron Age hillfort now encompasses the remains of a motte and bailey castle. The hillfort enclosed the summits of two adjacent hills, Wendel Hill and Hall Tower Hill.

Pastscape's record rather romantically offers:
The hillfort has been identified by some researchers as the capital of Cartimandua. It has also been interpreted as the capital or chief stronghold of the Kingdom of Elmet and was later owned by Edwin Earl of Mercia.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
29th April 2013ce

Rombald's Moor — Links

Internet Archive


'The Prehistoric Rock Sculptures of Ilkley" by J Romilly Allen - in the Journal of the British Archaeological Association v35 (1879).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
23rd January 2013ce

Hanging Stones (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Folklore

Under the famous Hanging Stone, with its mystic "cup and ring" sculptures, the rock is hollowed out forming a deep overhanging cavity, and I am told that this ancient rock-shelter has been known from time immemorial as "Fairies' Kirk," and traditions of its having been tenanted by those tiny sprites, the fairies, still exist among old people in the neighbourhood. When the Saxons established themselves at Ilkley they were going to build a church up here, but the fairies strongly resented. They would have none of it, and so their little temple was erected in the vale below. The fairies distrust any intrusion upon their own sacred places [...] I cannot go into all the details I have heard of the antics of these mysterious little people here and in the neighbouring gills.
From Upper Wharfedale by Harry Speight (1900). He also writes:
Hanging Stones (west of Cow and Calf), cup and ring marked. Some vandal has been imitating the primeval sculptures by chiselling on the same stone, but the freshness of the recent work is at once seen. It is to be regretted that quarrying has been permitted to get so near this exceedingly valuable monument of antiquity, a relic which, as the ages roll on, must gather an ever-deepening interest.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
23rd January 2013ce

Cow and Calf Rocks (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

The "Cow" which I find was called in 1807 "Inglestone Cow," a name now quite forgotten, bears no mean resemblance to a castle, while the "Calf" may be likened to a keep; the two rocks having possibly been united by a wall or bulwark of turf and stones forming a secure and chief enclosure. The "Cow," as it now stands, is I should say the largest detached block of stone in England, measuring eighty feet long, about thirty-six feet wide and upwards of fifty feet in height. From one point of view it presents, like the jutting face of Kilnsey Crag, as seen from the north side, the appearance of a huge sphinx, which may be intentional, or it may be natural, probably the latter.

The face of the rock bears a depression that looks like a human foot, and local tradition concerning it is that the genius of the moors, a certain giant Rumbald, was stepping from Almias Cliff on the opposite side of the valley, to this great rock, but miscalculating its height his foot slipped, leaving the impression we now see.

Both the "Cow" and the "Calf" have cups and channels on their surfaces, which were conjectured by Messrs. Forrest and Grainge in 1869 to be connected with Druidical priestcraft, and that their purpose was "to retain and distribute the liquid fuel which fed the sacred flame on grand festivals of the year."
From Upper Wharfedale by Harry Speight (1900).
Another page reads:
Cow and Calf, basin, cup and channel marked. Described above. Some think the "basins" are due to natural weathering. I have heard it said the "Calf" fell from the "Cow" during a terrific storm about a century ago, but this is extremely doubtful. Anciently the Cow was known as the Inglestone.
And here:
Many of the rocks have been broken up for making the roads and other purposes in recent times. The largest and most notable of these was a monster slipped-boulder which stood near the road below the "Cow and Calf." It was as large as an ordinary cottage and was known as the "Bull Rock." To the regret of many it was destroyed. Old people tell me that these isolated rocks have borne the names of Bull and Cow and Calf time out of memory, but no legend is known to attach to them.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
23rd January 2013ce
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