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<b>United Kingdom</b>Posted by stubobAvebury © stubob
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News

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Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas


For the first time, a detailed online atlas has drawn together the locations and particulars of the continues...
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd June 2017ce
Edited 5th July 2017ce

The 25th Festival of Archaeology will take place between the 11th - 26th July 2015


The Festival is a huge celebration of our incredible history here in the UK, and you don't have to be an archaeologist to join in. It's a chance for everyone to explore and uncover the past, see archaeology in action, and bring the history on your doorstep to life. We look forward to seeing you there... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
8th July 2015ce

Free open Days - 11 to 14 Sep - UK Wide


Find out what's open in your local area - Every where listed is free for the day!

http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/advanced-search

For more information about the European Heritage Days, visit www.ehd... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
10th September 2014ce
Edited 10th September 2014ce

Help wanted to create 3D modeling of megalithic sites


http://heritagetogether.org/?lang=en

"HeritageTogether is an AHRC-funded project run by Bangor, Aberystwyth and Manchester Metropolitan Universities in conjunction with Gwynedd Archaeological Trust... continues...
juamei Posted by juamei
20th February 2014ce
Edited 20th February 2014ce

British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online


British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online

http://ukra.jalbum.net/brac

Quite a few people will hopefully remember BRAC - the online image gallery covering British rock art sites... continues...
Posted by Chappers
2nd December 2013ce

CBA issue "Archaeology is about knowledge, not treasure" article


Following on the from ITV's "Britain's Secret Treasures" programme, the Council for British Archaeology have issued an excellent, unequivocal statement on their website... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th July 2012ce

What caused Britain's Bronze Age 'recession'?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12989605

A large gap in pre-history could signal that Britain underwent an economic downturn over 2,500 years ago... continues...
Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
7th April 2011ce

British ancient forests were patchy


From PlanetEarth online

What were Britain's primordial forests like before humans started tampering with the environment? The latest clues from a study of fossil beetles suggest that the ancient forest was patchy and varied in density across Britain... continues...
baza Posted by baza
30th November 2009ce
Edited 30th November 2009ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
Local Myths and Legends: UK Section

http://www.localmythsandlegends.com/united-kingdom/

This is a unique resource for all things odd, mystical, unexplained and peculiar. From local tales of giants to driver-terrorizing phantom hands, the website allows users to add their own local legends with the interactive maps.
Chance Posted by Chance
4th March 2011ce
Edited 2nd September 2012ce

Links

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Of barrows, burials and blades of bronze


A fascinating article on barrows and their history.
moss Posted by moss
28th August 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


How To: Report Dumped Rubbish or Damage to a Heritage Site

An article I wrote which details how to report damage or litter at prehistoric sites that you may find as you work your way through the sites on TMA. In short:

1. Take lots of photos.
2. Take 5 minutes to briefly write down the following:
- date
- site name
- site location (an OS ref will do)
- type of crime
- extent of crime
3. Ring the police on 999 if its happening right now and on 101 if its already happened. You do not have to give your name.
juamei Posted by juamei
8th June 2012ce
Edited 8th June 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


Spot the stone circle competition!

Can you recognise any of these stone circles from the aerial photos?
A friend just emailed me this link so thought I'd share it on here if anyone wants to have a go. Good luck!
Emma A Posted by Emma A
24th May 2012ce
Edited 24th May 2012ce

Old newspapers go on-line


All over the press today, the official launch of the British Library Newspaper website. May be of use to TMAers... a search for Stonehenge found 450 articles to read.
Mr Hamhead Posted by Mr Hamhead
30th November 2011ce
Edited 30th November 2011ce

The coins of the ancient Britons


Victorian guidebook to coins of various ancient British tribes By Sir John Evans from 1864 - A nighthawkers delight

Download the complete book in PDF via Google books
Chance Posted by Chance
25th July 2010ce

Mythology and rites of the British Druids


Mythology and rites of the British Druids as certained by national documents and compared with the general traditions and customs of heathenism, as illustrated by antiquaries of our age. With an appendix, containing ancient poems and extracts, with some remarks on ancient British coins.

by Davies, Edward
Published in 1809, Printed for J Booth (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Ancient man in Britain


Ancient man in Britain.
by Donald Alexander Mackenzie
Published in 1922, Blackie (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Life in early Britain


Life in early Britain
being an account of the early inhabitants of this island and the memorials which they have left behind them

by Windle, Bertram Coghill Alan Sir.
Published in 1897, David Nutt (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom


An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom.
by Murray, David
Published in 1896, MacLehose (Glasgow)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The antiquities of England and Wales


The antiquities of England and Wales.
by Grose, Francis
Published in 1785, S. Hooper (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.


The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.
by Evans, John Sir
Published in 1897, Longmans, Green, and Co. (London, Bombay)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Standing Stones & Monoliths - stories from the Paranormal Database


150 Recorded Paranormal events from the UK's Standing Stones & Monoliths
Chance Posted by Chance
25th October 2009ce

Latest posts for United Kingdom

Showing 1-10 of 109,694 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Cairn O' Mount (Round Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cairn O' Mount</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
9th December 2018ce

Foel Frech (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

About half a mile south of Cerrigydrudion - yes, the village immortalized (in certain antiquarian circles, anyway) by Mr Cope back in 2007 - the B4501 leaves Thomas Telford's A5 to immediately cross the Afon Ceirw at Pont Moelfre, prior to cutting across the hills to Frongoch. Now, should the latter also sound familiar.... well, to be fair, it should. Since it was here that Michael Collins, among others, was interned in the aftermath of the farcically inept Easter Rising of 1916, no doubt busy laying the foundations of his public - albeit ultimately personally tragic - triumph of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921. The landscape here certainly echoes such lofty ideals and I'm verily captivated by the vivid colour contrast as the low early morning light periodically illuminates the flanks of the valley. Suffice to say the words to further elucidate such natural beauty will not come to me.

So, there's serious history in them thar hills. However, as momentous as that may be, today I'm wearing my 'prehistoric hat'; and boy, does it need a wash. Speaking of which.... more later. Anyway, eventually a single track road at Nant-y-crytiau ventures northward across Cadair Benllyn, subsequently veering westward upon encountering a multi-gated cross roads beside an old chapel yo eventually terminate at the isolated farm of Blaen-y-cwm. As I negotiate the final livestock barrier I have the pleasure of making the acquaintance of, by all accounts, the smallholder, his initial countenance one of bemused bafflement at my very presence. He enquires whether I speak Welsh, presumably since, clearly, no tourist would venture here in a million years? Or so. As it happens I do not. Although, in mitigation, most Welsh people I know do not speak Welsh either. Including members of my family. Nevertheless my explanation, to the effect of planning to go for a walk in the teeming rain to find an ancient burial cairn, strikes him as perfectly rational behaviour for an English gentleman. As long as I fasten the gate behind me, mind. Well, after all, one doesn't get much opportunity to venture forth in the midday sun. In North Wales.

At Blaen-y-cwm a green track-cum-bridleway makes it way in a south-westerly direction, ascending across the eastern flanks of Foel Frech to a gated bwlch (col). The track veers approx north-west to (eventually) meet a metalled road accessing the former Medieval pilgrimage hub of Ysbyty Ifan astride the Afon Conwy; however, not requiring sanctuary at this time, I instead cut across the western aspect of Foel Frech to (eventually) locate the Bronze Age cairn marked upon the map. Sited overlooking the Nant Llan-gwrach a quite considerable distance below and to to the north-west of the summit, the monument occupies - or at least did at the time of the visit - a position that may be plausibly described as, er, 'rather wet indeed'. To be honest this was always going to be the case given both the topography... and fast moving fronts of vicious, driving hail.

Now there are occasions when venturing out in seriously inclement weather - particularly upon the hills - can result in a veritable working over by Mother Nature for no real correspondingly tangible reward. Tell me about it. However it soon becomes apparent that here, set within the not insubstantial remnants of this cairn, we have the clear and rather copious remains of a large cist still extant. Furthermore, the intervals between hail fronts are denoted by the sweeping washes of golden light so prevalent earlier in the day. In such conditions, despite leaky boots overwhelmed by the sheer deluge of frozen precipitation ejected by the looming, at times overwhelming, cumulonimbus, this wild hill side is the place to be right here, right now. Well, for a Citizen Cairn'd, anyway.

Those interested in the technical detail should note that Coflein reckons the monument is:

"...circular in plan and measures approximately 6.5m in diameter by up to 0.4m high. It is well constructed with densely-packed stones and has a cist in the centre. The cist measures 1.4m long by 1m wide and 0.4m deep. It has a long vertical cist slab running along the southern side and a shorter slab on the eastern side. There is a further shorter slab that has been displaced and is sat on the northern edge of the cairn... " [P.J. Schofield, OA North, 16/9/2009].

As is usually the case, however, it is the landscape context which makes a visit here so worthwhile, the cairn's obscurity assuring a great, windswept upland vibe. However it is as a viewpoint that the site really excels since, arranged in serried rank to the west, sit the mountains of Northern Snowdonia in all their expansive glory, Moel Siabod standing vanguard to the fore. Well, at least in the welcome, brilliantly lit intermissions between hail storms, that is.

Now should there be, due to some currently unfathomable breech of the laws of physics and everything science holds dear, mountain gods inhabiting these regions, suffice to say they are a bunch of mischievous, nebulous rogues, so they are. Well, put it this way: I've lost count of the number of times when, a mere few hundred yards from reaching the sanctuary of the car nice n'dry... the heavens duly open. Hey, it's almost as if....
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
8th December 2018ce
Edited 9th December 2018ce

Bryn Cau (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

This arguably rather incongruous monument stands just above the minor, gated road traversing the Lliw valley... yet is, as far as I could tell, not visible from it. Not mentioned on the current OS maps, it is, nonetheless, subject to CADW scheduling. According to Coflein:

"Remains of a small cairn situated on a saddle between two local promontories on a NW-SE aligned ridge. The cairn is circular in shape and measures c. 4.2m in diameter. It is shallow in profile and measures c. 0.65m tall". (F.Foster/RCAHMW 02.10.2006)

Worth checking out in conjunction with the larger monument about a half mile to the NW below Foel Ystrodur Fawr.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
7th December 2018ce

Vespasian's Camp and Blick Mead (Hillfort) — News

Ancient platform 'damaged' during Stonehenge tunnel work


Archaeologists have accused Highways England of accidentally drilling a large hole through a 6,000-year-old structure near Stonehenge during preparatory work for a tunnel.

The drilling, which is alleged to have taken place at Blick Mead, around a mile and a half from the world-famous neolithic ring of stones, has enraged archaeologists, who say engineers have dug a three-metre-deep hole (10ft) through a man-made platform of flint and animal bone.

Highways England have said they are not aware of any damage to archaeological layers on the site caused by their work and will meet with the archaeological team on Thursday, led by David Jacques, a senior research fellow at the University of Buckingham.......



https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/dec/06/ancient-platform-damaged-during-stonehenge-tunnel-work
moss Posted by moss
7th December 2018ce

Clach Ossian (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Clach Ossian</b>Posted by Howburn Digger Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
7th December 2018ce

Cradle Stone (Rocking Stone) — Images

<b>Cradle Stone</b>Posted by markj99<b>Cradle Stone</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
3rd December 2018ce

Cradle Stone (Rocking Stone) — Fieldnotes

Visited 01.12.18

I was staying in Crieff for a few (rainy) days so I visited the Knock of Crieff. The Cradle Stone is around 250 yards up the Knock Walk from the Lower Car Park, then 100 yards into the woods on the R. The OS Grid Reference is spot on. It is adjacent to a smaller boulder, also cleft in half, curiously.

There is a local belief that placing a coin in a crack in the Cradle Stone will make a wish come true. I invested 5p but I'm still waiting...
Posted by markj99
3rd December 2018ce

Concraig (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Concraig</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
3rd December 2018ce

Wemyss Caves - The Court Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — Links

The ancient symbols hidden in a cave


Latest news on the protection of these caves.
moss Posted by moss
3rd December 2018ce
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