The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Herefordshire — News

Detectorists hid find that rewrites Anglo-Saxon history


An expert gasped when he saw coins unearthed by two men now convicted of theft

On a sunny day in June 2015 amateur metal detectorists George Powell and Layton Davies were hunting for treasure in fields at a remote spot in Herefordshire.

The pair had done their research carefully and were focusing on a promising area just north of Leominster, close to high land and a wood with intriguing regal names – Kings Hall Hill and Kings Hall Covert.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/nov/21/detectorists-hid-find-that-rewrites-anglo-saxon-history

Grange / Lios, Lough Gur (Stone Circle) — Links

Lough Gur 6000


Explore 6,000 years of human development

County Donegal — News

Hoard of the Rings - Bronze Age treasure on display


The heaviest intact prehistoric gold hoard ever found in Ireland has gone on public display at the
Donegal County Museum in Letterkenny.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ulster/2019/1119/1092820-donegal-gold-hoard/

Knocknarea (Cairn(s)) — News

Conservation plan required for cairn of Queen Maeve atop Knocknarea


A meeting of Sligo County Council has heard there is an incredible amount of damage being done to one of the most significant historic monuments in the country, the stone cairn over Queen Maeve’s grave on the summit of Knocknarea.

Sinn Fein Councillor Chris MacManus says a small number of people climb on top of the cairn while Fine Gael Councillor Sinead Maguire says people can be seen coming down the mountain carrying rocks from the cairn.

A local resident in the area also told Ocean FM News recently that some people have been digging up quartz stones from around the base of the cairn.

More (including a short poscast): https://www.oceanfm.ie/2019/11/12/conservation-plan-required-for-cairn-of-queen-maeve/?fbclid=IwAR1a2nXG8r302c0nimDg6CjVi-rTSgn2ZOhumlnKeEYZfIlfPttgmVOE-xA

Boyne Valley Complex — News

Archaeologists say they've discovered what could be Neolithic log boats near Newgrange


The river bed of the Boyne is being searched by archaeologists.

ARCHAEOLOGISTS HAVE IDENTIFIED what could be Neolithic log boats as well as boulders, perhaps intended to be used in the building of Newgrange or Knowth, in the river bed of the Boyne, near to the famous monuments.

More: https://jrnl.ie/4878107

Kileenmore (Bullaun Stone) — Miscellaneous

So there's actually 10 basins.

Basin 1 : 0.27 diam x 0.05m deep
Basin 2 : 0.33m diam. by 0.16m deep
Basin 3 : 0.2m diam. by 0.05m deep
Basin 4 : 0.33m diam. by 0.15m deep
Basin 5 : 0.25m diam by 0.15m deep
Basin 6 : 0.32m diam by 0.13m deep
Basin 7 : 0.23m diam by 0.03m deep
Basin 8 : 0.3m diam by 0.13m deep
Basin 9 : 0.26m diam by 0.1m deep
Basin 10 : 0.18m diam by 0.04m deep

Carbury Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Carbury Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

The northernmost and largest of the three barrows.

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Barrow - ring-barrow

Townland: CARBURY

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: Towards the N end of Carbury Hill (0D 470 feet) and the northernmost of three closely associated sites; another ringbarrow (KD008-005----), c. 180m to the SW, and a possible mound barrow (KD008-003----), c. 360m to the SW, all excavated by Willmot in 1936 under a State financed scheme for the relief of unemployment (1938, 130-42 (Site B)). Only part of the central area and a section of the enclosing element at E were excavated. The grass-covered circular area (int. diam. c. 30m) was found to be defined by an inner, rock-cut fosse (Wth c. 4.5m; D c. 1.1m), and an outer 'bank' (Wth c. 4.5m; H c. 0.8m) constructed of broken stone and gravel, with a possible (but unexcavated) entrance gap at the NE. The central area was composed of a layer of decomposed rock (D c. 0.45-0.6m) and contained two postholes of undetermined function and nineteen burials. These included four cremations, two of which were disturbed, and fifteen extended inhumation burials, four of which were children, and some of which contained the remains of more than one individual. The cremations appeared to precede the inhumations and one was accompanied by two iron rings and a pin-shaped fragment of iron. All the inhumations had their heads placed towards the SW, and one was accompanied by an iron shears. Other finds included flint scrapers and knives, a stone disc, a sherd of pottery of undetermined type and a 'bronze knob'. The two burial rites suggest a long period of use, perhaps spanning the Late Bronze Age/Iron Age period. The monument was subsequently restored to it's pre-excavated morphoplogy.

Compiled by: Gearóid Conroy

Date of upload: 10 June 2011

The middle of the three barrows.

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Barrow - ring-barrow

Townland: CARBURY

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: Some 180m NE of the summit of Carbury Hill (OD 470 feet) and the central of three closely associated monuments; a possible mound barrow (KD008-003----) c. 180m to the SW, and a second ringbarrow (KD008-004----) c. 180m to the NE, all excavated by Willmot in 1936 under a State financed scheme for the relief of unemployment (1938, 130-42: Site A). A circular area (ext. diam. c. 26m) was defined by an inner, rock-cut fosse (av. Wth c. 2.4m; D c. 0.45-c.0.9m) and an outer 'bank' (Wth av. c. 4.8m; H c. 0.6m) constructed of broken, rubble limestone. Opposing entrance gaps occurred at NW (Wth c. 3.65m) and SE (Wth c. 2.4m) and were matched by corresponding, undug, causeways across the fosse. The circular interior (diam. c. 11.6m) was covered by a layer of broken rock (D c. 0.3m) and contained a centrally placed cremation. A second cremation was found in the fosse at N. Finds included eight worked flints, a spindle whorl, two sherds of red 'gritless' pottery, a jet spoon, an iron file and a fragment of fused blue glass. An Iron Age date was suggested for the monument, which was subsequently restored to it's original morphology.

Compiled by: Gearóid Conroy

Date of upload: 10 June 2011

The southernmost barrow on the peak of Carbury Hill with the trig point.

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Barrow - mound barrow

Townland: CARBURY

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: On the summit of Carbury Hill (OD 470') and the southernmost of three closely associated sites; a ringbarrow (KD008-005----) c. 180m to the NE, and another ringbarrow (KD008-004----) a further c. 180m beyond to the NE, all excavated by Willmot in 1936 under a State financed scheme for the relief of unemployment (1938, 130-42. (Site C)). A small, circular, grass-covered mound (diam. 8.2m; H. c. 1m) had a slight depression on it's upper surface and had been used for bonfires in the past. The mound was composed of rock rubble mixed with earth. A small rectangular hollow (dims. L c. 0.3m; Wth c. 0.2m; D c. 0.25m) in the bedrock beneath the mound contained the cremation of a juvenile. No grave goods were found but its prominent siting might suggest that it was the earliest of the three monuments here and may date to the Late Bronze Age. The monument was subsequently restored to it's pre-excavation shape.

Compiled by: Gearóid Conroy

Date of upload: 10 June 2011

Howth (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Howth (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie

Class: Cairn - unclassified

Townland: HOWTH

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: Located on the summit of Kilrock on Howth Head. This is a circular round-topped cairn (diam. 6.5m; H 2-2.5m). There is a great deal of shattered stone visible on the surface. Kerbstones are visible along E and SW. A trignometrical station is marked at this point and there is the possibility that the cairn was constructed for this purpose. Spectacular views north to Ireland's Eye and east coast.

Compiled by: Geraldine Stout

Updated by: Christine Baker

Date of upload: 29 January 2015

Howth Demesne (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Howth Demesne</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Howth Demesne</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Howth Demesne</b>Posted by ryaner

Boherboy (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Boherboy</b>Posted by ryaner

Seefingan (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Seefingan</b>Posted by ryaner

Castleruddery (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Castleruddery</b>Posted by ryaner

Kilranelagh Graveyard (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Kilranelagh Graveyard</b>Posted by ryaner

Glencullen (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Glencullen</b>Posted by ryaner

Glencap Commons Upper (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Castletimon (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Castletimon</b>Posted by ryaner

Castletimon (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

From the Castletimon Heritage Trail sign:

Legend says that the Ogham stone was once picked up by the Castletimon Giant and was thrown down the hill and the scratches on it were left by his fingernails.

Also... There was once a man who lived near the Ogham stone who took it from its place to use it as a hob stone. The fairies got so angry they made his cutlery dance and jiggle. After a week of this he got so annoyed he took it back to its original place.

Castletimon (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Castletimon</b>Posted by ryaner

Punchestown Standing Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

At the north-west corner of the field there is a service entrance to Punchestown racecourse. The gate is sometimes open but if it isn't there is a hurdlable wall. Over this and back into the corner, the fence into the pasture field that holds the stone is easily surmountable. The hedging and fencing that line the road are impossible. (If you're not into leaping the medium-difficult wall you can walk up to the actual racecourse entrance a couple of hundred yards up the road and come back to this point. The racecourse allows dog-walkers and strollers and is a popular amenity for the denizens of Naas up the road)

There is a footworn track from the field corner to the stone so people are still determined to visit despite the obstacles. The stone itself is magnificent, the views north blocked but those south-east towards the Wicklow mountains fine. An old info sign has been trashed and thrown into the battered enclosure, the cement that holds the stone up after it was re-ercted in 1934 visible but not too obtrusive.

Punchestown Standing Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

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Punchestown (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Punchestown</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Punchestown</b>Posted by ryaner
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Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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