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Angus

Sites/Groups in this region:

24 posts
Airlie Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
1 site
Alrick Cairn(s)
14 posts
Ardestie Souterrain
7 posts
Arniefoul Cairn(s)
8 posts
Ascreavie Hill Cairn(s)
5 posts
Auchterhouse Hill Hillfort
3 posts
Auldallan Standing Stones
33 posts
Balgarthno Stone Circle
2 posts
Balgay Hill Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
2 posts
Balhall Cup Marked Stone
17 posts
Balkello Standing Stone / Menhir
28 posts
Balkemback Stone Circle
6 posts
Balloch Cairn(s)
12 posts
Ballownie Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Balmuckety Standing Stones
8 posts
Balstard Stone Circle
5 posts
Balzeordie Hillfort (Destroyed)
14 posts
1 site
Barns of Airlie Souterrain Souterrain
8 posts
Battledykes Cairn(s)
1 post
Beattie's Cairn Cairn(s)
7 posts
Bell Hillock Cairn(s)
14 posts
2 sites
Brankam Hill
9 posts
Bridgend of Lethnot Ring Cairn
6 posts
Brown Caterthun Hillfort
5 posts
Burnfoot Cairn(s)
11 posts
Caddam Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Cairn Knap Cairn(s)
4 posts
Cairn Motherie Cairn(s)
4 posts
Cairn Plew Cairn(s)
7 posts
Camperdown Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Cantsmill Cairn(s)
11 posts
Carlungie Souterrain
5 posts
Carlunie Cairn(s)
2 posts
Carmyllie Hill Burial Chamber
11 posts
The Carrach Cairn(s)
2 posts
Carrot Hill Cup Marked Stone
18 posts
Carsegownie Round Cairn
10 posts
Carse Grey Stone Circle
12 posts
1 site
Castle Hill (Meams) Hillfort
10 posts
Castle Hill Wood Stone Setting
4 posts
Castle Rock Promontory Fort (Destroyed)
4 posts
Cat Law Cairn(s)
29 posts
Colmeallie Stone Circle
5 posts
Conon Souterrain Souterrain
14 posts
Corogle Burn Stone Row / Alignment
13 posts
Cortachy Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Craigowl Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
10 posts
Culhawk Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
5 posts
Dark Stane Roundie Round Cairn
6 posts
Denoon Cup Marked Stone
15 posts
Denoon Law Hillfort
9 posts
Devil's Stone (Invergowrie) Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Dickmount Law Cairn(s)
6 posts
Doonies Kerbed Cairn
2 posts
Douglamuir Enclosure
7 posts
Dronley House Artificial Mound
21 posts
Dron Hill Sacred Hill
15 posts
Drumsturdy / Laws Souterrain
9 posts
Dumbarrow Hill Stone Fort / Dun
16 posts
1 site
Dundee Law Hillfort
13 posts
Dun Mor Hillfort
12 posts
Easter Memus Standing Stone / Menhir
17 posts
Easter Peathaugh Stone Circle
7 posts
East Campsie Kerbed Cairn
4 posts
Elephant Rock Natural Rock Feature
8 posts
Elliot Water Promontory Fort
14 posts
1 site
Finavon Hillfort Hillfort
7 posts
Foldend House Cairn(s)
5 posts
Fordhouses Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
4 posts
Formal Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Gallows Hillock Cairn(s)
12 posts
Gallows Knap Round Barrow(s)
8 posts
Gallows Knowe Cairn(s)
10 posts
Gallow Hill Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
4 posts
Gallow Hill 2 Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
9 posts
1 site
Gallow Hill (Cortachy) Cairn(s)
6 posts
Gaylet Pot Natural Rock Feature
3 posts
Girdlestane Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
5 posts
Glen Mark Cairn(s)
8 posts
Glen Wood Cairn(s)
7 posts
Grasslet Ring Cairn
8 posts
Guthrie Hill Cairn(s)
5 posts
Haer Cairn Cairn(s)
6 posts
Hare Cairn Cairn(s)
4 posts
Hatton (Labothie Hill) Cairn(s)
1 post
Hill of Finavon Cup Marked Stone
5 posts
Hill of Milton Cairn(s)
16 posts
Hill of Prieston Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
5 posts
Huntingfaulds Cairn(s)
17 posts
Huntlyhill Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Hurly Hawkins Broch
3 posts
Killievair Standing Stone / Menhir
12 posts
Kilry Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Kintrockat Cairn(s)
10 posts
Kirkbuddo Cairn Cairn(s)
8 posts
Kirkton Hill Cairn(s)
10 posts
Kirriemuir Hill Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
1 site
Labothie Hill Cairn(s)
4 posts
Law Of Coull Cairn(s)
11 posts
Law Of Windsor Cairn(s)
15 posts
Lendrick Lodge Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Lintrathen Cairn(s)
5 posts
Lud Castle Promontory Fort (Destroyed)
6 posts
Marchburn Cairn(s)
9 posts
Maryton Cairn(s)
8 posts
2 sites
Meams Hill Ring Cairn
7 posts
Meigle Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
1 post
4 sites
Meikle Kenny Stone Row / Alignment
9 posts
Melgund Cottage Cairn(s)
5 posts
Mile Cairn Cairn(s)
5 posts
Morenish Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
32 posts
non rock art
13 posts
Noranside Standing Stone / Menhir
8 posts
Ogil Cairn(s)
2 posts
Old Montrose Cursus Cursus
10 posts
Philpie Standing Stones
8 posts
Pitmudie Stone Row Stone Row / Alignment
15 posts
Pitscandlie Standing Stones
3 posts
Pitscandly Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
11 posts
Prail Castle Promontory Fort
3 posts
Prieston Hut Circles Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
8 posts
Red Castle Cairn(s)
5 posts
Red Head Promontory Fort
7 posts
1 site
Reedie Cairn(s)
1 post
Reswallie Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
10 posts
4 sites
Strone Hill Stone Circle
1 post
St Ninian's Well Standing Stones (Destroyed)
5 posts
Tarfside, Blue Cairn Cairn(s)
30 posts
Tealing Souterrain
3 posts
Tealing Hill Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
3 posts
Tealing Hill cist Cist
3 posts
Tealing Hill settlement Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
16 posts
Tealing Stones Standing Stones
5 posts
Templewood Cairn(s)
12 posts
Torrax Cairn(s)
7 posts
Torrax Hill Wood Cairn(s)
18 posts
1 site
Turin Hill Hillfort
6 posts
Vayne Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Waggles Artificial Mound
12 posts
Welton Cairn(s)
18 posts
Westerton Standing Stone / Menhir
12 posts
Wester Coul Cairn(s)
11 posts
Wester Peathaugh Cairn(s)
7 posts
West Mains Cairn(s)
5 posts
West Mains of Ethie Promontory Fort
9 posts
3 sites
Wheen Cairn(s)
9 posts
1 site
Whitehillocks Stone Circle
4 posts
White Cairn Cairn(s)
21 posts
White Caterthun Hillfort
Sites of disputed antiquity:
2 sites
Aberlemno
11 posts
Auchterhouse Stone Circle
5 posts
Glamis Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
St Arnold's Seat Cairn(s)

News

Add news Add news
Late Bronze Age Weapons Discovery Hailed As 'Find Of A Lifetime'

What an absolute belter of a find!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-38971099
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th February 2017ce
Edited 15th February 2017ce

Carnoustie's Golden Sword

Intriguing find under footie pitch.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=8e3_1473699545
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
15th September 2016ce

Children Take To Tribal Life Of Ancient Scots Warriors.

Face painting, period clothes and ancient language make fighters of young blades at Picts event.

More info:

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1811872
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
5th July 2010ce

Boat provides historical insight.


A Bronze Age logboat which had lain unseen in the River Tay for 3,000 years is being studied by archaeologists.
It is hoped the find will yield important new information about how human ancestors lived... continues...
The Eternal Posted by The Eternal
29th December 2006ce

Polished axehead found at site near Forfar

See a picture of the beautiful stripey (part-of-an) axehead at The Courier:
http://www.thecourier.co.uk/output/2006/02/12/newsstory8018512t0.asp

There are contact details if you want to go on the next visit to the find site with the Kinnettles and District Heritage Group, on the 19th Feb.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
13th February 2006ce

Images (click to view fullsize)

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<b>Angus</b>Posted by Hob

Links

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The Angus Glens


nickbrand Posted by nickbrand
2nd March 2003ce

Latest posts for Angus

Showing 1-10 of 1,513 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Welton (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

After a good look at The Carrach I headed south west on good underfoot conditions to another cairn with a load of field clearance plonked on top. Also standing guard was a very friendly cow who had a friend lying down in the hot sunshine, obviously his shift on watch had just finished.

Fantastic views south, and to numerous sites Lintrathen, Foldend, Strone Hill, Welton, Mile Hill etc etc, this area has a fantastic amount of prehistory.

The badly damaged cairn is best identified by its footprint and the kerbs that remain. Its taking a bit of a beating, perhaps underneath the rubble might be ok, it does make me wonder where all of these decent sized stones came from and what they might have been used.

Still the views are tremendous and Lintrathen's water sparkled in the sunshine.

Visited 8/08/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

The Carrach (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The next stop on this scorcher of a day was to ask permission to park at Kinclune House, which is further along the B951 a couple of miles west of Kingoldrum. Once again I was given information on prehistoric sites , this time about Kinclune Hill which I've noted for a later visit.

From the house I went back down the road, west, a short distance before jumping over the wee Kinclune Burn to head uphill, over a couple fences. The climb is short but steep as I almost headed straight north. After the steepish climb the countryside is more 'rolling'. Look for the trees to the east and follow them. The site will be easily spotted as it has had a load of field clearance dumped on top.

The cairn's footprint makes it about 11m wide with several kerbs still place, especially on the west side, to the east more of the cairn can be seen. Somewhat ironically, Kinclune Hill can be seen to the east, but my feet would head west.

Tremendous views.

Visited 8/08/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Castle Hill Wood (Stone Setting) — Fieldnotes

Several boulders make up this monument which, to me, is a Four Poster stone circle with some boulders lying beside it. The site appears to be built on top of small mound which is about 4m wide.

From Balstard Stone Circle head towards the trees, slightly to the south and follow them heading north east. This should lead to the site.

Another impressive almost long forgotten site.

Visited 8/08/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Balstard (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

Culhawk barrow is on the the south west side of the hill and from there I made my way over the hill of the same name heading east whilst being baked by the sun. Stunning all round views from here make you realise how flat, apart from the obvious hills, the area to the south is. Culhawk is the south east edge to the Highlands and one of the gateways to the mountains. Roads heading north west tend to lead to the A93 as it winds its way through Glenshee to Braemar. Keep following the track over he hill, jump the gate and the remaining standing stone will soon be in view.

This relatively unknown circle has 5 stones that can be seen, I think there is one hidden beneath the turf on the south side. 4 are resting and one still stands, looking like it's protecting its friends. The site is 10m wide sitting between the Culhawk and Castle Hills.

Another superb site.

Visited 8/08/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Culhawk (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

At Kirriemuir take the B951 and head north west until the first minor road heading east, take this then take the the first farm track heading north which leads to Culhawk Farm. I was allowed permission to park by two well informed gentlemen who knew about numerous prehistoric sites in the area. This would prove to be a great day for meeting interesting people.

On the hottest day of the year, for me, I headed up the south west flank of CulHawk Hill being sheltered by some well placed trees. The grid ref on Canmore is 'iffy' and its locator 'iffier', the grid I've given is hopefully more accurate. The barrow is on the west side of the track with clear views west to the cairn on Kirkton Hill near Kingoldrum.

With beautiful scenery all round the turf covered site sits at 16m wide and 1.5m tall. The east side has been clipped by the track and the usual houking has taken place but despite the damage I thought this a superb site.

Great way to start the day.

Visited 8/08/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th September 2020ce

Gallow Hill (Cortachy) 2 (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The furthest east of the two cairns is probably slightly better preserved, it is also was the place of execution were a few witches met an untimely end.

Big kerbs remain in place especially on the south, towards the north the kerb is more spaced out, most likely robbed. Field clearance has been dumped in the middle.

A great way, to end a very early start and late finishing day. The legs had gone so I made my way back to the car and headed home via the misty Cairn O Mount.

Visited 25/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce

Gallow Hill (Cortachy) (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The final stop of the long short cut home saw me land at the Gallow's Hill near Cortachy. From Cortachy I headed east but missed the road at Cossacks, taking the road north just before Memus. At Dykend I took the road heading west, complete with the sign I always ignore 'if sat nav took you here you must be in the wrong place'. Just before a steep corner heaping uphill, there is a road heading south (the road on the OS). I parked at a long abandoned quarry.

From the quarry head uphill then head east passing some lonely looking trees. There are tremendous views looking over the Angus countryside.

Easy to see why some would have called them stone circles. Several kerbs remain in place joined by boulders that are probably field clearance. Most of the stones have been removed probably crushed to make nearby roads. However, the site remains at 11m wide and has nearby company.

Visited 25/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce

Turin Hill (Hillfort) — Folklore

Conall Corc and the Pictish Dreamtime

The circular homesteads on Turin have similarities with others in Perthshire and one authority has likened these to Irish structures and linked to an incursion of Gaelic speakers into the region between 500 and 800 AD. There is, remarkably, an ancient Irish tale which may be linked to the site which would suggest this is true and push back the Irish link to the earlier part of this date range, if not before it. I have fancifully called this the Pictish Dreamtime, though this is an unforgivably romantic description of the period just beyond the Pictish historical horizon. I summarised the tale of the possibly 4th century Corc in an earlier post (which can be fully read here ). His story is contained in the Irish legend of 'The Finding of Cashel'.

Conall Corc, from the Eoganáchta people, was the son of King Luigthech and Bolce Ben-bretnach (“the British woman”), which suggests there may have been even earlier contact between Munster and North Britain. Conall was later adopted by another ruler, his cousin Crimthann, but when he rejected the advances of Crimthann's wife he was sent in exile to the Picts in Britain. In this foreign land, Conall almost perished in a blizzard, but he was saved by the bard of the local Pictish king. The bard also noticed a magical message written on Conall’s shield at the behest of his father. The message directed the king of Pictland to kill Corc. But the poet changed the words to request the king to give Corc every assistance he could and even give his daughter to the Irish immigrant, which is exactly what happened. Prince Corcc remained in Pictland until he had seven sons and an immense fortune. One of his sons founded the Eoganacht kin-group of Circinn, and was possibly the ancestor of the Pictish king Angus mac Fergus.

Several sources name Mongfinn’s son Cairbre, while the Book of the Hui Maine says the son was Main, but there were three other sons attributed to Corc and Mongfinn, all born in Alba. The full name of Feradach’s daughter was apparently Leamhain Mongfionn, and she had by Corc, Cairbre Cruithenechán of Circinn and Maine Leamhna. The latter was ancestor of the Mormaers of Lennox, around Loch Lomond.


What has this to do with Turin? Corc ended up apparently at the fortress of a Pictish leader named Feradach. The stronghold was named Turin brighe na Righe. The name may be coincidental, but it is still impressive. Corc married Mongfinn, daughter of the Pictish king, stayed ten years sojourn in Alba, and had three sons. In three manuscript versions of the descendents of Eber in the Psalter of Cashel, one of these says that Cairbre Cruithinechan (“Pict Sprung”) was ancestor of the Eoganacht of Magh Circinn.



Whether or not the tales hold water, they are nevertheless intriguing, and ultimately perhaps unprovable. I have provided Vernam Hull's full translation of one version of the tale of Corc below for anyone interested. The first part of the tale is mission, but the story is interesting all the same.

The Exile of Conall Corc

...Dublin and saw the ships going over the sea. He went with them eastwards over the sea and perceived the mountains of Scotland. They let him go onto the land. He went to a mountain in the west of Scotland. Much snow descended on him so that it reached his girdle. For five days he was without drink and without food until he cast himself down in a dying condition in a glen.
Gruibne the scholar, the poet of Feradach, king of Scotland, came, twelve horsemen strong, into the glen to seek his pigs. He beheld a lap of his mantle above the snow.

"A dead man!" he said. He saw that his body was [still] warm. "Frost has done that to the man," said the poet. "Kindle a fire around him in order that his limbs will be able to rise."

That was done so that he steamed. Suddenly he arose.

"Steady, O warrior," Gruibne said. "Do not fear anything."

Then, on beholding his countenance, Gruibne spoke as follows:"Welcome, O fair Conall Corc who took each land in the west beyond the region of the sea. Here, the ocean confused you so that sleep stretches you out. A host with silent troops of valor uttered a heavy cry for nine hours so that you were unable to find a word. Good [is] the meeting to which I am destined, [namely], that you came upon me [and] that you did not abide upon the surface of another land. [It was] a plan of sin that sword-ends were brought for your betrayal over the flatness of your body. ..of Lugaid mac Ailella. With honor he was honored. . . O mighty Corc about whom firebrands raise a cry,for fair Cashel protects you so that it will be over Femen that you will rule with fine feasting. Well will you suppress bad weather. In Munster-of the-great-hosts you will receive hostages so that you will be the lion of Loch Lein. Your fame will fill Ireland's vast plain and the race of Oengus above the surface of each land. The adze-heads will come over the sea's ocean with hooks of crooked staves." Actually the poet who had recited the poetic composition was one of the two captives whom Corc had protected from the Leinstermen. Then he put both his arms around him."It were indeed fitting for us," he said, "to welcome you. Who," said he, "saw to your advantage by means of the Ogham writing which is on your shield?" It was not good fortune that it indicated."

"What is on it?" said Corc.

"This is on it: If it be during the day that you might go to Feradach, your head is to be removed before it were evening. If it be in the night, your head is to be removed before it were morning. Not thus will it be."

Afterwards, he bore him with him to his own house, and a hurdle [was] under him, and eight men [were] under the hurdle. On that day a month later, he went forthwith to speak with Feradach, and he left Corc outside. He related to him his whole story, namely, how he went to seek his pigs, and he said that he had intended to kill the man. When he saw the Ogham writing on the shield, he was loath to slay him, for this was on it: "A son of the king of Munster has come to you. If it be during the day that he might come, your daughter is to be given to him before evening. If it be in the night, she is to sleep with him before morning."

"The news is bad," said Feradach. "Anyone would indeed be sad that you have brought him alive."

"Gruibne bound his equal weight in silver on Feradach and brought him in. That one offered him a great welcome. But the daughter was not given to him, for Feradach said that he would not grant his daughter to a hireling soldier . . . from abroad. This availed him hot, because the couple had intercourse with each other so that the woman became pregnant by him, and she was brought
down, and bore him a son. She did not admit that it was Corc's. They intended to burn her [and] the men of Scotland came for the burning. It was formerly a custom that any maiden who committed fornication without bethrothal was burnt. Hence, these hills are [named] Mag Breoa, that is Mag Breg. Then the men of Scotland besought a respite for the girl to the end of a year until her son
had assumed the form, voice or habit of the sept.

At the end of a year they came to burn her. "I will not bring your son to you," said she.

"You shall, however, bring him," said he, "into the presence of Feradach."

When, then, she was about to be burned, she brought him before both of them.

"O woman," said Feradach, "does the boy belong to Corc?"

"He does," said the woman.

"I will not take him from you," said Corc, "for he is a bastard until his grandfather gives him."

"I do indeed give him to you," said Feradach. "The son is yours."

"Now he will be accepted," said Corc.

"Go forth, O woman," said Feradach, "and you shall have no luck."

"She shall, however, not go," said Corc, "since she is not guilty."

"She is, nevertheless, guilty," said Feradach.

"But she is not guilty," said Corc. "To each son [belongs] his mother. On her son falls her misdeed, that is, on her womb."

"Let the son, therefore, be expelled," said Feradach.

"He shall indeed not be expelled," said Corc, "since that youth has not attained manhood. For the son will pay for her offence."

"You have saved them both," said Feradach.

"That will be fortunate," said Corc.

"Well, O Corc,"said Feradach, "sleep with your wife. It is you whom we would have chosen for her, if we had had a choice."' I will pay her price to the men of Scotland."

That was done. He remained in the east until she had born him three sons.

"Well, O Corc," said Feradach, "take your sons and your wife with you to your country, for it is sad that they should be outside of their land. Take the load of three men of silver with you. Let thirty warriors accompany you."

That was done. He came from the east, thirty warriors strong, until he reached Mag Femin. There, snow descended upon them so that it led them astray at Cnocc Graffand. His father was infirm.That brought them northwards into the north of Mag [Femin].

On that day, the swineherd of Aed, the king of Muscraige, was tending his pigs. That night, he said to Aed: "I saw a wonder today," said he, "on these ridges in the north. I beheld a yew-bush on a stone, and I perceived a small oratory in front of it and a flagstone before it. Angels were in attendance going up and down from the flagstone."

"Verily," said the druid of Aed," that will be the residence of the king of Munster forever, and he who shall first kindle a fire under that yew, from him shall descend the kingship of Munster."

"Let us go to light it," said Aed.

"Let us wait until morning," said the druid.

[Thither] then came the aforesaid Corc in his wanderings.He kindled a fire for his wife and for his sons so that Aed found him on the following day by his fire with his sons about him. He recognized him then, and he gave him a great welcome, and he put his son in surety under his custody. When,
now, after the death of his father there was contention about the kingship of Munster, then Corc came. Thereupon, a residence was at once established by him in Cashel and before the end of a week, he was the undisputed king of the Munstermen.

The surety of the Muscraige is the first surety that a king of Munster ever took, and, afterwards, they were freed, and a queen of theirs [was]in Cashel. Moreover, the swineherd who was found in Cashel, freedom was given to him and to his children by the king of Cashel, that is, without tribute and without exaction of king or steward. It is he, too, who raises the cry of kingship for the king of Cashel, and is given a blessing by the king, and straightway receives the garment of the king. Hence it is, then, that Corc's Cashel exists, and it is the progeny and the seed of Corc mac Lugthach that abides forever in Cashel from that time forth.

Angus Folklore
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce

Ascreavie Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Continuing the longest possible short cut home I headed to Ascreavie Hill, this time approaching from the North. After leaving Torrax I headed north crossed the B951 and continued north passing the cairn at Wester Coul. An interesting road this, tremendous views, twisty and dangerous at the same time. It almost takes you to Balintore castle in one of the sharpest corners I've seen in a long time. Eventually I found what I was looking for, the path near Turniemuick which headed up Ascreavie Hill.

My original intention was to follow the path to the top then head west. However I gave up on that idea as it isn't a path, it's a nightmare so jumped the fence and headed south west. On reaching the top, as normal, there is a decent track, follow that west until the end of the small wood then head south. The last time I'd tried to climb up, after visiting the Balloch Cairn, blizzards and gale force winds drove me back down. This time, a beautiful summer's day.

Sadly there isn't much to see of the 11m wide cairn, it has been severely damaged. However several kerbs remain in place. Small cairns to the west have also received similar treatment. One thing that can't really be removed is the view, The Crandard to the north, Clune Hill to the south.

Worth the hike, best approached from the south.

Visited 25/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce

Torrax (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Walking up from the cairn on the south side of Torrax Hill you wander through numerous field clearance and possible hut circles. Underfoot conditions are good as the sheep have done a good job and luckily (for me) its bone dry. Get to the bottom of the north side, jump a wee burn and the cairn will be straight in front.

This place hardly, as far as the lady at Torrax Farm knows, gets any visitors, quite a few probably well aware of the Melgam Burn that provides quite an obstacle to the north.

Superb all round views including an old friend Cairn Plew to the north east. (there is a camera lying round about, left many years ago) This site is 13m in width and up to 1m high. The east side has been breached or trenched but not entirely removed to reveal slabs which are the remnants of a cist. It must have been an impressive size.

Lovely place, lovely views.

Visited 25/07/2020.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2020ce
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