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Re: The Findhorn 'Great Circle of Death'
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I found this in the 1961 edition of Discovery and Excavation in Scotland, page 33:

SOILSHAN, TOMATIN. STRATH DEARN
From lain C. Walker

NH 811281. The OS. 6-inch Sheet XXXII marks the site of a Stone Circle here. The site is in the valley of the Findhorn, in Soilshan Wood, immediately at the foot of Slochd about 270yards due E of Soilshan farm and 100yards E of the Edinburgh-Inverness railway, in natural woodland just below the open moor.

According to the information given to (the Ordnance Survey c. 1870, the circle, "supposed to have been Druidical," had been removed "at different times about forty years ago."

There seems no obvious reason for the removal of the stones: the site, visited this summer, is, as far as can be ascertained, a vaguely saucer-shaped depression on a small flat part of the hillside, knee-deep in bracken which, however, does not grow elsewhere in the immediate vicinity. Dimensions were impossible to obtain, but the bracken-covered area had a very rough diameter of perhaps 50 feet. A fairly, large number of boulders exist in, but do not show through, the bracken, but without plane-tabling, it is impossible to say if they form any part of a circle or circles.

Neither the SA nor NSA note any antiquities in the parish of Moy and Dalarossie, but the site is presumably "The Great Circle of Death" referred to by G. Bain in his The River Findhorn from Source to Sea (1911) p. 11.

The site is ideally sited along the route from Strath Nairn to Strath Spey, which must have been followed by the Clava cairn builders penetrating to the latter area, yet Strath Dearn is completely lacking in any known prehistoric sites, despite Bain's stone circles, tumuli, hut circles listed but with no references. The term Druidical Circle, it should be noted, is a very common local appellation for Clava, cairns.

This is the Canmore reference:

https://canmore.org.uk/site/14954/soilshan-wood


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BigSweetie
Posted by BigSweetie
22nd January 2019ce
16:52

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