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Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March (Standing Stones) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman<b>Buwch a'r Llo and Mynydd March</b>Posted by postman

Garrig Hir (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Garrig Hir</b>Posted by postman<b>Garrig Hir</b>Posted by postman<b>Garrig Hir</b>Posted by postman<b>Garrig Hir</b>Posted by postman<b>Garrig Hir</b>Posted by postman

Garrig Hir (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

I parked the car with daughter within at the little car park just south of Llyn Pendam, and walked into the woods along a track that at first looks like it could take a car, it can't, fallen trees and bottomless puddles etc.
Soon I was out of the trees and on an open hill side, just as the track plunges down hill, look right, the house is hidden by garden trees, the stone is hidden too, but I was sure of it's location, so I climbed over the gate and walked the walk. On approach, the standing stones worse nightmare had occurred, the stone was indeed hiding, it was lying down in a ring of dead Daffodils. The ring of Daffodils was a bit odd but shit man the stones fallen over, how very sad. Sadder still, i'm the first to have visited in 14 years apparently, so god knows when it fell.
Looking at the clump still clinging to the bottom of the stone, and the muddy tide mark showing how deep it was inserted, I'd say it let go of the vertical world no more than a year or two ago. It was leaning even when Kammer came, so a bad wind storm or two would have been all it took.
How sad.

Penrhyncoch Camp (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Negotiating the often steep maze of lanes from one stone to the next we passed by this iron age settlement, I had wanted to see Pen y Castell hill fort but was unsuccessful in my management of time, so this little one would do for a surrogate iron age fix. It isn't the best fort in the vicinity, half of it, to the west, including the entrance is too ploughed out to photograph. But a quick look at the aerial photos on Coflein will show it's hillfortyness.
http://map.coflein.gov.uk/index.php?action=do_details&cache_name=ZXh0ZW50dHlwZSxCT1hfbWlueCwyNjU2MzZfbWlueSwyODM5MjhfbWF4eSwyODQxNDdfbWF4eCwyNjU5NzBfc2VhcmNodHlwZSxhZHZhbmNlZF9vcmE=&numlink=303591#tabs-4

Penrhyncoch Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Penrhyncoch Camp</b>Posted by postman<b>Penrhyncoch Camp</b>Posted by postman<b>Penrhyncoch Camp</b>Posted by postman<b>Penrhyncoch Camp</b>Posted by postman

Cerrig yr Wyn (Standing Stones) — Miscellaneous

Found this on Coflein

Two small standing stones standing apart in sloping pasture, divided by an old trackway or bank. The name translates as 'the stones of the lamb' (source: Os495card; SN68SE11). That to the east is the larger, a rectangular flat slab, while that to the west is a far smaller pointed stone. Both stones appear to occupy small platforms shelved into the hillslope, but the apparent platform below the western stone seems to be a lump of naturally outcropping rock, rather than an artificial platform. The stones are overlooked from the north-east by a large rounded outcrop in the field, which has the form of a Bronze Age barrow but is again a natural feature. It is entirely possible that its resemblance to a burial mound influenced the siting of the two standing stones here. A further possibility advanced by Simon Timberlake is that the two stones mark the line of a longer Bronze Age trackway coming up from the coast, via Clarach, Gogerddan and Penrhyncoch, and climbing into the foothills around Plynlimon passing other standing stones (see: Timberlake, S., 2001. Mining and prospection for metals in Early Bronze Age Britain: making claims within the archaeological landscape. In: Bruck, ed., Bronze Age Landscapes: Tradition and Transformation. Oxbow, 179-192.). This is a possibility, although difficult to prove, as these stones command spectacular views west along the valley of the Nant Silo.

Cerrig yr Wyn (Standing Stones) — Images

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Thornborough Henge North — Images

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Thornborough Henge Central — Images

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Thornborough Henge South — Images

<b>Thornborough Henge South</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge South</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge South</b>Posted by postman
Showing 1-50 of 9,533 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
After visiting over a thousand ancient places and driving between fifteen to twenty thousand miles every year I can only conclude that I'm obsessed with these places, and finding this website ten years ago only compounded that obsession, at least I'm not alone anymore.

My favourite places are:

Ring of Brodgar
Callanish
Balnauran of Clava
Torhouskie
Swinside
Nine stones close
Bryn Celli Ddu
The Druids circle (penmaenmawr)
HafodyGors Wen
Gwal y Filiast
Grey Wethers
Boscawen Un
La Roche au Fees
Drombeg
Uragh
Talati De Dalt

and these are only the ones that immediatly spring to mind, so many stones and not enough lifetimes.

My TMA Content: