The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Carn Gafallt (Cairn(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Carn Gafallt</b>Posted by Davey Jones

Pen Pumlumon-Fawr (Cairn(s)) — Links

Legendary Landmarks

Folklore and folklore inspired artwork at a number of sites in west Wales including a section on Pen Pumlumon Fawr.

Pen Pumlumon-Fawr (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pen Pumlumon-Fawr</b>Posted by Davey Jones<b>Pen Pumlumon-Fawr</b>Posted by Davey Jones

Pen Pumlumon-Fawr (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

Pen Pumlumon Fawr finds its place in legend as the dwelling of a reaver giant who often waylaid unwitting travellers and became notorious throughout the land. In King Arthur's hunting of the monstrous boar Twrch Trwyth, as told in the tale of Cullhwch and Olwen, a great hunting hound named Drudwyn was needed. Unfortunately no leash in the world could hold such a powerful hound save one manufactured from the beard of this robber giant of Pumlumon. Here is the extract from Lady Charlotte Guest's translation of the Mabinogion that details the events which were said to have taken place here.

'As Cai and Bedwyr sat on a beacon carn on the summit of Pumlumon, in the highest wind that ever was in the world, they looked around them, and saw a great smoke towards the south, afar off, which did not bend with the wind. Then said Cai, "By the hand of my friend, behold, yonder is the fire of a robber!" Then they hastened towards the smoke, and they came so near to it, that they could see Dillus Farfawc scorching a wild boar. "Behold, yonder is the greatest robber that ever fled from Arthur," said Bedwyr unto Cai. "Dost thou know him?" "I do know him," answered Cai, "he is Dillus Farfawc, and no leash in the world will be able to hold Drudwyn, the cub of Greid the son of Eri, save a leash made from the beard of him thou see yonder. And even that will be useless, unless his beard be plucked alive with wooden tweezers; for if dead, it will be brittle." "What thinkest thou that we should do concerning this?" said Bedwyr. "Let us suffer him," said Cai, "to eat as much as he will of the meat, and after that he will fall asleep." And during that time they employed themselves in making wooden tweezers. And when Cai knew certainly that he was asleep, he made a pit under his feet, the largest in the world, and he struck him a violent blow, and squeezed him into the pit. And there they twitched out his beard completely with the wooden tweezers; and after that they slew him altogether.'
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