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Showing 1-20 of 281 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20

Dun Deardail (Stone Fort / Dun)

Ash from destructive hill fort fire 'preserved in peat'


Archaeologists believe they have found, preserved in peat, charcoal from a fire that destroyed an ancient hillfort.

Dun Deardail was built about 2,500 years ago on a prominent knoll on Sgorr Chalum, a hill overlooking the River Nevis in Glen Nevis.

Charcoal found in surrounding peatbog has been analysed.

Four "significant fire events" were identified as layers of charcoal or soot. One, from around 310BC, is thought to be the fort's burning.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-43813824

Rousay

Archaeologists search for answers in 'Egypt of the North'


A TEAM of international archaeologists hope to answer questions remaining about an Orkney island known as "the Egypt of the north".

The experts have started the largest geophysics survey to date on Rousay, a hilly island off Orkney Mainland.....................



http://www.thenational.scot/news/16171515.Archaeologists_search_for_answers_in__Egypt_of_the_North_/

Ramsey Island

Ramsey Island: New survey finds 'Bronze Age' site


The laser scan of Ramsey Island uncovered a "hidden" landscape thought to date back to the Bronze Age.

The survey, taken from the air, has also seen a detailed 3D model of the two mile-long beauty spot made for the first time.

Experts say the data could also be used to see if climate change affects the environment on the island.

Royal Commission archaeologist Dan Hunt described the findings as "incredible".

He added: "It has presented us with a stunning view of the island in enormous detail."


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-43534578

Lewis and Harris

Housebuilder uncovers Iron Age chamber on Lewis


A 2,000-year-old underground chamber has been uncovered during work to build a house on the Isle of Lewis.

The Iron Age souterrain was revealed during the digging of the foundations for the property in Ness.

Local archaeologists, husband and wife team Chris and Rachel Barrowman, are recording the souterrain.

Dr Barrowman said theories on the purpose of the stone-lined, flat stone-roofed structures included storing food.

continued...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42988416

Stonehenge and its Environs

Archaeologists may have found architects' camp for Stonehenge


A team of archaeologists believe they may have discovered a spot where some of the architects of Stonehenge gathered and camped.

The team have been investigating a causewayed enclosure – these are thought to be ancient meeting places or centres of trade – on army land at Larkhill close to Stonehenge.

They found an alignment of posts that matches the orientation of the circle at Stonehenge, leading to the theory that Larkhill could have been some sort of blueprint for the temple.

Si Cleggett, of Wessex Archaeology, conceded it was possible to suggest that any evidence of prehistoric settlement could be connected to the creation of Stonehenge.


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/02/archaeologists-architects-camp-stonehenge-larkhill

North Yorkshire

Ancient lake reveals a colorful past


Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' - possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying colour to their animal skins or for artwork.

The ochre crayon was discovered near an ancient lake, now blanketed in peat, near Scarborough, North Yorkshire. An ochre pebble was found at another site on the opposite side of the lake.


https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/uoy-alr012618.php

Worlebury (Hillfort)

Hill fort brambles to be removed to reveal archaeology for the first time since 1824


The fort, in Worlebury Woods, suffered from vandalism and was classified as being ‘at risk’ by Historic England at the end of 2016.

North Somerset Council has received a £10,000 grant to pay for surveys at the site to see what work needs to be done to preserve it.

The volunteers of Worlebury Hill Fort Group have started to introduce limestone grassland to the area known as the glade.


http://www.thewestonmercury.co.uk/news/worlebury-hill-fort-group-to-remove-brambles-to-uncover-archaeology-1-5353052

East Riding of Yorkshire

Ancient henge discovered in Yorkshire


THOUSANDS of years ago it would have stood proud on the horizon, a striking monument which could be seen for miles. The circular monument lay hidden for centuries under farmland, its existence only hinted at in crop marks, spotted in aerial surveys.

Read more at: https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/ancient-henge-discovered-in-yorkshire-1-8930717

Moel Arthur (Hillfort)

Mysterious Stone Tools Unearthed at Bronze-Age Site in Wales


Amateur archaeologists excavating a Bronze Age site in the United Kingdom have discovered a cache of unusual stone tools unlike any that have been found before.

The tools appear to have been deposited deliberately — perhaps ceremonially — in what would have been a stream around 4,500 years ago, according to the researchers.


https://www.livescience.com/60606-stone-tools-unearthed-at-bronze-age-site.html

Thanks to Stone Pages for this information.

Jersey

Archaeologists find Stones of interest


A COLLECTION of stones has been unearthed by a team of UK archaeologists investigating fields in St Clement earmarked for a new estate of 200 affordable homes.
Five stones, which could date back to the Island’s neolithic past when the dolmens were built, were discovered by a team from the Museum of London Archaeological Services at the former Samarès Nursery site.

Read more at..

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/10/18/archaeologists-find-stones-of-interest-on-estate-site/#5rD5GMXgMU4tVElq.99

Stonehenge and its Environs

New Stonehenge path open – at last 9 October 2017 |


For those who like to walk and cycle and it's free...


The new Permissive Path at Stonehenge is finally open after a three-year delay waiting for the grass to grow strong enough to bear the weight of a few cyclists and pedestrians.
A group of pedestrians and cyclists from surrounding villages joined together to mark the re-opening of the route, accompanied by former Wiltshire councillor Ian West. He campaigned strongly against English Heritage for the path to be re-opened as specified in a planning agreement.
The right of way passes within a few feet of the Heal Stone and gives free access to the public. The path allows the public to use the old A344 road and the new path from Airman’s Corner roundabout to the A303 free of charge and without any passes.
“It allows you to take some beautiful photographs without having to have a local residents’ pass and then booking your appointment time along with other tourists,” said a jubilant Mr West. “The path opens up the old connection between Shrewton and West Amesbury, if you are brave enough to cross the A303, although the authorities deem it to be a safe crossing,” he added.
Horses are not permitted on the new path, which is part of the old road now grassed over, but they can go from the roundabout to By-Way 12, which passes close to the stones, to Larkhill in one direction and Druids Lodge in the other, free of charge and without passes. This opens up the access to the by-way and allows travel in both directions on horseback.



http://www.yourvalleynews.co.uk/frontpage-news/new-stonehenge-path-open-last/

Stowe's Pound (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Stowe's Pound fairy stack creators 'are historic vandals'


Visitors to a 6,000-year-old site who are removing stones and piling them up to be "artistic" could be causing significant damage, experts say.
Stones from Stowe's Pound on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, are being used to build the "fairy stacks" by people "probably unaware" they are breaking the law.
The stacks have been described as "historic vandalism".
The practice at the Scheduled Ancient Monument site has also been condemned by Historic England.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-41245644

Cheddar Gorge and Gough's Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter)

Prehistoric Britons ate their dead and carved mysterious markings on their bones


Cheddar Gorge in Somerset’s Mendip Hills is one of Britain’s most beautiful natural wonders, with its sweeping limestone cliffs, and striking natural rock chambers.

But new evidence suggests the picturesque site had a deeply sinister past.

Paleontologists have discovered that around 15,000 years ago, British cave dwellers filleted and ate their dead relatives before inscribing markings on their bones in grisly prehistoric rituals.

It is the first time that such practices have been found in the Paleolithic, or Old Stone Age - which dates from 2.6 million years ago to around 12,000BC - anywhere in the world.




http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/08/09/ancient-britons-ate-dead-carved-mysterious-markings-bones/

Hendraburnick Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Is stone most decorated in Southern Britain?


NEW archaeological evidence has suggested that an ancient stone monument near Davidstow was used for moonlit rituals during the Bronze Age, and could top Stonehenge for being the ‘most decorated stone in southern Britain’.

The Cornwall Archaeological Society has found new evidence, suggesting that the Hendraburnick ‘Quoit’, situated near Davidstow, was used for moonlit rituals or ceremonies during the late Neolithic and bronze age period.

The work conducted on Hendraburnick Quoit, was funded and carried out by the Cornwall Archaeological Society and led by Dr Andy Jones, an archaeologist from the Cornwall Archaeological Unit, and Penzance-based Tom Goskar, an archaeologist with a specialism of using digital technologies to find new evidence within artefacts from the past.
Speaking about the new evidence, Dr Jones told the Post: “We’re really pleased. It’s something we’ve known about for quite a long time, but it’s really, really good — a remarkable find.
“It (the Hendraburnick Quoit markings) is a unique find. There are lots of decorated monuments in the UK, but for southern Britain, it’s very remarkable.”

And so forth...

http://www.camelford-today.co.uk/article.cfm?id=108583&headline=Is%20stone%20most%20decorated%20in%20southern%20Britain?§ionIs=news&searchyear=2017

Rousay

Orkney archaeological dig is a battle between time and tide.


AN archaeological investigation of an eroding mound on the island of Rousay in Orkney dig is revealing extensive settlement.

But there is a battle against time to find the whole truth hidden under the ground at Swandro as the sea continues to eat away at the land.

The dig is being led by the University of a Bradford and Orkney College UHI, and the ancient settlement was discovered by Dr Julie Bond in 2010.

She had spotted a few odd stones only just visible among the pebbles. Since then, the excavation has been changing the understanding of this site.

The tops of stones partly buried by the boulder beach turned out to be set uprights forming part of a prehistoric building around the high tide mark.

Although the tops of the stones are worn and battered by the sea, the beach has partly protected the deposits. Animal bone and pottery were recovered, finds suggesting an Iron Age context.

continued...

http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/orkney-archaeological-dig-is-a-battle-between-time-and-tide-1-4514267

Orkney

Orkney Neolithic 'butterfly-like' motifs found by chance


"Neolithic markings carved into a stone in Orkney that were missed for years by archaeologists have been discovered by chance.
The faintly incised "butterfly-like" motifs were revealed on Tuesday as sunlight lit up the rock at the "right moment, at the right angle".
Experts believe the marks were deliberately made to be delicate and to catch light at certain times of day.
The find was made during excavations at Ness of Brogdar.
The incisions are so faint they do not show up in photographs taken so far of the stone.
The block formed part of wall of a structure at the dig site. It has since been moved to safe location."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-40653877

Dig diary date;

http://www.nessofbrodgar.co.uk/dig-diary-tuesday-july-18-2017/

Worlebury (Hillfort)

Importance of ‘at risk’ hill fort promoted to ensure it can be preserved


Preserving an ‘at risk’ ancient monument in Weston-super-Mare is a priority for Historic England and a volunteer group, who hope teaching schoolchildren about its importance will ensure it is looked after for generations to come.



http://www.thewestonmercury.co.uk/news/importance-of-at-risk-hill-fort-promoted-to-ensure-it-can-be-preserved-1-5021355

Shropshire

Dig finds UK's oldest sacred site is in Shrewsbury


"Barker and Jenks discovered prehistoric burial mounds and cremations, slots for standing stones and two rows of Neolithic post holes and a ditch, known as a cursus, which they interpreted as a processional way. It was aligned east to west, extending towards the current church building.

“The current church appears to have incorporated and deliberately built over late Neolithic/early Bronze Age remains. The 15-inch section of post we found was sticking up into the Medieval foundations,” said Janey Green, of Baskerville Archaeological Services.

“It is an incredibly complex site and appears to have been used and re-used for religious purposes for over 4,000 years. It is well known that Christians liked to build churches over pagan sites.

“More work needs to be done but early interpretations indicate that it is the earliest known sacred site in Britain that is still in use today."


Read more at https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/local-hubs/2017/05/18/dig-finds-oldest-sacred-site-in-the-uk/#3jeResuJxr0OjCLo.99

Stonehenge and its Environs

The Stonehenge tunnel: ‘A monstrous act of desecration is brewing’


“The issue is whether Stonehenge exists to provide a tourist experience, or whether it is something more significant, both historically and spiritually,” he says. “It has stood there for 4,500 years. And up to now, no one’s thought of injecting enormous quantities of concrete into the landscape and permanently disfiguring it.”


https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/25/stonehenge-tunnel-desecration-prehistoric-traffic-jams

News

Iron Age chariot and horse found buried together in Yorkshire


The Ancient Brits loved their wheels. Indeed they seem to have been so attached to their sports-car-style chariots that they may even have thought they could use them to get to the next world.

Academic knowledge about these elegant high status prehistoric British vehicles is now set to increase significantly, following the discovery of an ancient Briton buried inside his chariot in East Yorkshire.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/iron-age-chariot-horse-yorkshire-archaeology-significant-find-half-a-century-buried-together-a7659091.html
Showing 1-20 of 281 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20
"I once blew a blast into the Blowing Stone, which rolled a hollow wave of sepulchral sound into the hills. The megalith builders, taking their lesson from the conch-shells of the Eastern Mediterranean, blew into this very stone to summon the gods or, more probably, the goddess of the high places. Another two miles and there is the goddess herself or rather, the celtic descendant of the goddess, stretched in white and in flight across the bald brow of Uffington Hill. The downs lift to 800 feet and by their very godliness of combe and crescent, of jutting ness and plunging spur, ordain the tie beam of White Horse Hill to be one more of the holy places of the chalk. So it was on Windover Hill.... and so it is here where the Celtic town of Uffington is flanked by the galloping horse and a Neolithic workshop on the one side, and the chambered long barrow of Wayland's Smithy with its grove of beeches on the other.".......

H.J.Massingham - English Downland


http://northstoke.blogspot.co.uk/

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