The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Bryn Celli Ddu (Chambered Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Bryn Celli Ddu</b>Posted by Howden<b>Bryn Celli Ddu</b>Posted by Howden

Fonlief Hir (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Fonlief Hir</b>Posted by Howden

Moel-y-Sensigl (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Moel-y-Sensigl</b>Posted by Howden

Carreg (Llanfair) (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Carreg (Llanfair)</b>Posted by Howden

Harlech Standing Stones — Fieldnotes

On the single lane road rising above the town of Harlech a series of single stones mark your way to the cairns and remains of a settlement at Moel Goedog.

Llanbedr Stones (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Llanbedr Stones</b>Posted by Howden<b>Llanbedr Stones</b>Posted by Howden

Llanddyfnan (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Well worth visiting the Stone Science museum virtually opposite. Interesting book store and lots of dinosaur stuff to interest the kids!

Llanddyfnan (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Llanddyfnan</b>Posted by Howden

Lain Wen Farm Inscribed Stone — Fieldnotes

A small and rather uninspiring stone hidden behind a dry stone wall right next to the A4080 running south from the A5 towards Barclodiad y Gawres. Interesting for the Roman (?) inscriptions carved on to it.

Lain Wen Farm Inscribed Stone — Images

<b>Lain Wen Farm Inscribed Stone</b>Posted by Howden

Harold's Stones (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Harold's Stones</b>Posted by Howden

The Countless Stones (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>The Countless Stones</b>Posted by Howden

Y Ffor (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Y Ffor</b>Posted by Howden<b>Y Ffor</b>Posted by Howden

Cefn Isaf (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Cefn Isaf</b>Posted by Howden

Caer-Dyni (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Caer-Dyni</b>Posted by Howden

Milford Round Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

This is what appears to be a round barrow, perched on the top of a hill at the northern edge of Cannock Chase. Certainly a shallow ditch surrounds a circular mound of earth, and though worn, I have no reason to doubt that it is what it appears to be! The remants of a cement post stands in the middle, though I can't imagine what it was there for. I can find no reference to the site in any resources I have on Staffordshire, though two 'Saxon burial mounds' (King's Low and Queen's Low) are situated on the flatter land to the north-west. I would be interested for some of you more experienced Antiquarians to have a first hand look at this site and say what you think.

Getting there;
Off the A513, turn into the second track leading to Sister Dora's Nursing Home. Beyond this, turning right, there is parking space for about 10 cars (it will be busy at weekends, so you could park on the Pay car park on the Common and walk through the trees to this point). With the Nursing Home behind you, you will see a small pond between two paths and to the left of this, a track leading directly up the hill. The burial mound is at the top of this hill.
Put the OS co-ordinates into Rhiannon's Get A Map link:
You are heading for the right of the 138 contour, just below Milford Common.

Milford Round Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Milford Round Barrow</b>Posted by Howden<b>Milford Round Barrow</b>Posted by Howden

Castle Ring (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Castle Ring</b>Posted by Howden<b>Castle Ring</b>Posted by Howden

The Devil's Ring and Finger (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>The Devil's Ring and Finger</b>Posted by Howden

Arthur's Stone (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Arthur's Stone</b>Posted by Howden<b>Arthur's Stone</b>Posted by Howden

Lud's Church (Natural Rock Feature) — Fieldnotes

I approached the site from the Southern side, having skirted around the sprawling towns of Stoke-on-Trent being carried along by 'The Curse of The Mekons'. The moorlands took over soon enough, and having left the car at a dead end, I walked along a cemented farm track and made my way over the ridge. Sign posts at this point reassured me that map reading skills were ok, because I had been doubtful. It isn't the easiest place to find. The path through Back Forest Wood is well trodden, suggesting a different approach may have been easier. This site appears to get a lot of weekend visitors.
Your first indication of Lud's Church is a warning sign, and a plea to stick to the designated footpath so as to avoid erosion of the site. Clearly this has not been heeded as a steep but well-worn pathway leads down the first cut, some ten yards before the steps which will lead you to the same place. The chasm just cuts into the ground, and from the wooded approach you wouldn't know it's there until you are upon it.
The gully leads you down and, at its deepest point, you are some 15 metres from the surface. It is absolutely still. No noise. Nothing. There is no-one here but me. The serenity of the place is awe inspiring.
Out the far end and onto a path which, upon exploration, led to Castle Cliff Rocks. This is a rocky outcrop on the valley side, giving plenty of opportunity to climb. I stood atop this and enjoyed the Spring sunshine while the occasional cock crow reminded me that I was still in the civilised world. It's an excellent place to hang out and picnic.
Approaching Lud's Chuch from this side, again no indication is to be had until you are upon the entrance; a cut into the hill-side. This leads you sharply down into the majesty of the gully. A cathedral like atmosphere pervades the whole place as I retread my steps, almost reverentially, towards the Southern entrance.
On returning to my car, I find it being investigated by some rare breed cattle, male, female and calf together. I come away hoping I have not been too obtrusive; to the cattle, to the chasm and to the countryside with which I have just enjoyed some holy communion.
Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros accompany me back through the towns and cities. I feel at peace with the world.

Lud's Church (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Lud's Church</b>Posted by Howden<b>Lud's Church</b>Posted by Howden<b>Lud's Church</b>Posted by Howden

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