The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Scotland (Country) — Links

shoreUPDATE


The interactive website of SHARP, Scotland's Coastal Heritage At Risk Register. News, events, interactive map of the 940+ sites at highest risk. Report via it any deterioration. A useful and worthy resource. Some of those sites may undoubtedly be yet to added to TMA too.

Orkney — Links

Orkneyjar Archaeology


What it says...there is already a link for Orkneyjar, tucked right down at the bottom of the page, dated from 2001. That covers a different part of the website, the 'history' bit. Sixteen years on the archaeology section has grown into an invaluable resource, and deserves to be at the top of the links and the first port of call for those visiting TMA interested in Orcadian archaeology. I therefore hope that this 'sort of relink' will be allowed to stand.

Knowe of Skea (Chambered Cairn) — Miscellaneous

I hope TMA Eds will forgive me adding a site I may never visit, but from what I have read so far it is a very intriguing place, little known, which may prove to be of considerable importance, and would appear to be in part contemporary with Ness of Brodgar. A tomb of unusual size. See also the separate eponymous entry for the nearby Iron Age part of this complex, and the link within it.

Knowe of Skea (Iron Age Shrine) — Links

Orkneyjar


A very interesting piece on Iron Age Orcadian burial practice, based on excavation of this structure.

Knowe of Skea (Iron Age Shrine) — Miscellaneous

This lies due north of the of the earlier and unusually large sized chambered tomb for which there is an eponymous but separate site entry. An underpublicised complex of importance. See link below for excavation details, and read the Canmore entry linked to the chambered tomb.

Knowe of Skea (Chambered Cairn) — Links

Canmore


The Canmore entry for a most intriguing complex of Bronze and Iron Age structures which are under threat of coastal erosion and where excavation has taken place for several years.

Carl Wark & Hathersage Moor — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Carl Wark & Hathersage Moor</b>Posted by spencer

Torhousekie Stone Row (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Torhousekie Stone Row</b>Posted by spencer

Greadal Fhinn (Chambered Cairn) — Links

Heritage Ardnamurchan


The archaeological section of the new website of the Ardnamurchan History and Heritage Association, listing all known sites, which will be added to as and when their members fieldwalking discovers them. Much to visit already that is officially notified but not as yet on TMA or elsewhere.

Ox Stones (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Ox Stones</b>Posted by spencer

Greadal Fhinn (Chambered Cairn) — Links

A Kilchoan Diary


An article with fine photographs of and information about Greadal Fhinn which also contains a link within it to more of both..as well as a photographic description of what you will see if you visit this site and then keep walking and climbing westward in this most majestical and starkly beautiful hidden corner of Scotland.

Scotland (Country) — Links

Rampant Scotland


A fine collection of Scottish archaeological websites, many with prehistoric-related contents

Minninglow (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Minninglow</b>Posted by spencer

Crammag Head (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

A return a year after my first visit, and I found that the replacement of the power line and the poles that carry it has caused fresh damage to the cliff to cliff earthwork that encloses the dun, which is believed may be an earlier structure. See photo. When the light was replaced a few years ago there was a watching brief on the work. Sadly, times seem to have changed..

Crammag Head (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Crammag Head</b>Posted by spencer

Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks</b>Posted by spencer<b>Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks</b>Posted by spencer<b>Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks</b>Posted by spencer<b>Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks</b>Posted by spencer<b>Cairn Macneilie, Inch Parks</b>Posted by spencer

Tree Island, Whitefield Loch (Crannog) — Fieldnotes

This site is no longer an island due to a fall in the level of the loch. It is unmarked on OS 82, but delineated by a cairn symbol on Explorer 310 on account of the spread of stone atop it. Access is from the fisherman's car park at NX 235 549, from whence paths radiate, then beating your way through the brush. Canmore ID 62149

Machermore (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Machermore</b>Posted by spencer<b>Machermore</b>Posted by spencer<b>Machermore</b>Posted by spencer<b>Machermore</b>Posted by spencer

White Loch of Myrton (Crannog) — Images

<b>White Loch of Myrton</b>Posted by spencer

Droughduil (Artificial Mound) — Links

Oxbow Books


Team leader Julian Thomas's account of the Manchester University Dunragit excavations, published in 2015. Contains a chapter on the archaeology of Luce Bay. A hugely important area, much work still to be done.

Dunragit Excavation


A summary of the Manchester University excavations at Dunragit in 1999-2002. Top photograph shows the excavation of Droughduil's W side. Another photo shows the excavations of the wooden Dunragit circle and triple concentric cursus, with the interlinked Droughduil, believed a viewing platform, in the background.

Droughduil (Artificial Mound) — Images

<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer<b>Droughduil</b>Posted by spencer

White Loch of Myrton (Crannog) — Images

<b>White Loch of Myrton</b>Posted by spencer

Kenmuir Graves, Island Buoy (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Kenmuir Graves, Island Buoy</b>Posted by spencer

Drumtroddan Standing Stones — Fieldnotes

Yes, I know I've wrongly uploaded a Cairnholy pic ..can't remove. (Eds?) Nor, he neatly sidestepped, the memories of visits to Drumtroddan. One of my 'evening' sites that suit that time of day. Night comes in, sun fades in the west. The stillness, the manicured grass island wherein they stand and lie, the horizon, the lichen. The two that lie.... perchance they sleepeth. One is on guard, slender but imutable, in profile in mourning for the fallen. Barsalloch mid October for the late afternoon bask, then here. Turn back and look when you get to the gate at the road. That head will still be visible against the fading light, still bowing, this time to you. Reciprocate. Try to return.

Cairnholy (Chambered Cairn) — Images

<b>Cairnholy</b>Posted by spencer

Drumtroddan Standing Stones — Images

<b>Drumtroddan Standing Stones</b>Posted by spencer

Cairnholy (Chambered Cairn) — Images

<b>Cairnholy</b>Posted by spencer

Dunman (Cliff Fort) — Images

<b>Dunman</b>Posted by spencer

Stair Haven (Broch) — Images

<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer<b>Stair Haven</b>Posted by spencer
Showing 1-50 of 352 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
I have always been interested in history, fictional or historical, and loved reading as a child the works of Rosemary Sutcliff. Yes, I did read Stig Of The Dump too. When ten I found a mussel midden when digging holes in the back garden - it turned out my folks house was built adjacent to the town hanging place, and the mussels were part of the additional social attractions. I used to visit sites when I could with my similarily interested father, particularily on holiday. Glenelg Brochs, Caer Caradoc, Maiden Castle, Warham Camp... History was my strong point at school, but life took me elsewhere for a career. I continued to read the likes of Graves, Belloc and Childe, though, as well as watching any history programme on television.. Cunliffe, Wheeler, Chronicle.. this continues to the present. I watch the repeats of the repeats of the repeats of Time Team, you name it. While my interest latterly has been for the most part armchair based, I have always loved looking at maps, and by using the distance between the Roman milecastles of Hadrian's Wall as a datum I have done a lot of work identifying Roman settlements along pre-Roman routes, cross referencing with linguistic clues in placenames and archaeological records. I also believe I have found three settlements of some size where little or no habitation exists today. Oh, to dig. I have no favourites as to type of archaeological site, and feel that phenomena such as holloways and holy wells or sacred springs are unjustly neglected compared to the likes of stone circle glamourpussies. A site is a site is a site. I visited many in the White and Dark Peak in the '80's before raising a family and steam engine restoration and firing took precedence. After tentative explorations on holiday over the last five years I have recently started to visit sites intensively again, but my circumstances frustratingly rarely permit this. My prime interest currently is visiting Western Scottish coastal sites, and, as a horticulturist, studying the botany in their environs that may be present day survivors of cultivation contemporary with site's occupancy, such a sorrel and, yes, gorse, sacred to the Celts and much used by them, now cursed by those interested in archaeology today. Sorry! (Not : p) Favourite sites: Lagvag Cairn, Dunman, Slochmill, Barsalloch, Powerstock Common, Eggardon Hill, Arbor Low, Warham Camp and Stevington Holy Well. Avatar: Torhouskie Stone Row. I took this image after being charged by cattle there five minutes earlier. A reminder to myself to make the most of what life may yet have to offer, including enjoying this, my hobby, as it can end in a trice.

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