The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Get the TMA Images feed
A R Cane

Latest Posts
Showing 1-50 of 1,063 posts. Most recent first | Next 50

Down Tor (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane

Enclosure east of Down Tor — Images

<b>Enclosure east of Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Enclosure east of Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane

Down Tor (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Down Tor</b>Posted by A R Cane

West Sussex — News

South Downs pre-Roman 'farming collective' discovered


Evidence of a prehistoric "farming collective" has been discovered after aerial laser scanning was carried out in the South Downs National Park.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-36771564

Edburton Hill (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Edburton Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane

The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne) (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne)</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne)</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne)</b>Posted by A R Cane

Maiden Castle (Dorchester) (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Maiden Castle (Dorchester)</b>Posted by A R Cane

Swallowhead Springs (Sacred Well) — Images

<b>Swallowhead Springs</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Swallowhead Springs</b>Posted by A R Cane

West Kennett (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>West Kennett</b>Posted by A R Cane

Old Sarum (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Old Sarum</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Old Sarum</b>Posted by A R Cane

Alfriston Church (Christianised Site) — Images

<b>Alfriston Church</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Alfriston Church</b>Posted by A R Cane

Sunkenkirk (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Sunkenkirk</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Sunkenkirk</b>Posted by A R Cane

Castlerigg (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Castlerigg</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Castlerigg</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Castlerigg</b>Posted by A R Cane

The Trundle (Causewayed Enclosure) — Images

<b>The Trundle</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>The Trundle</b>Posted by A R Cane

Rempstone Stone Circle — Images

<b>Rempstone Stone Circle</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Rempstone Stone Circle</b>Posted by A R Cane

Halnaker Hill (Causewayed Enclosure) — Images

<b>Halnaker Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Halnaker Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Halnaker Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Halnaker Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Halnaker Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane

Halnaker Hill (Causewayed Enclosure) — Fieldnotes

Like nearby Court Hill there’s not a great deal to see here in terms of the Causewayed Enclosure which once dominated this hill top, but there has been a great deal of activity since then and you certainly get your money’s worth. The most noticeable thing is the windmill (visible from the A27 between Arundel and Chichester) which has been here since 1740, though the original mill was built in 1540 for the nearby Goodwood Estate. The 1740 mill was destroyed by fire in 1913 and then vandals came back in the summer of 2015 to try and torch it again which is why it currently has no sails and you can no longer go inside. The enclosure is largely defined by a bank surrounding about 2 hectares, with the main entrance in the Southern part, where the modern gate stands today. The outer ditch has largely disappeared through centuries of ploughing. There are also three WWII structures, one inside, one in the bank and another just outside to the west of the entrance. These were either searchlight emplacements or Radio Directional Finding towers (nobody seems to agree which!) that would have served Goodwood and Tangmere airfields. It’s clearly always been a strategic and prominent point as Bronze Age and Roman artefacts have been found here as well and the Roman Stane Street runs about 200m to the South past the bottom of the hill. The views from here are also quite stunning with the rolling South Downs to the North and Chichester and the Channel to the South.

Court Hill (Causewayed Enclosure) — Images

<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Court Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane

Court Hill (Causewayed Enclosure) — Fieldnotes

Maybe there should have been a notice placed near the top of Court Hill saying ‘Move along now, nothing to see here’, but that wouldn’t be strictly true. Having conveniently parked at the little church at East Dean village we made our way up the track, past the ancient droving tracks descending from the Downs, and onwards to a copse which covers most of the hill top. The only evidence of the enclosure is a slight bank which comes around the South Eastern edge of the hill before disappearing through the fence into the copse. You can’t get into the copse because of a barbed wire fence and there seems to be a lot of stuff connected with the pheasant slaughtering industry in there, but you can definitely see evidence of the bank running through the trees (this is more evident if you look at a satellite image). Also from the top you get wonderful views along the valley towards Charlton, Goodwood Race Course and The Trundle (which has a Neolithic Causewayed Enclosure inside it’s Iron Age fortifications) and you’re also only about 3 miles from Halnaker Hill, another NCE.

Whitehawk Camp (Causewayed Enclosure) — Images

<b>Whitehawk Camp</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Whitehawk Camp</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Whitehawk Camp</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Whitehawk Camp</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Whitehawk Camp</b>Posted by A R Cane

Whitehawk Camp (Causewayed Enclosure) — Fieldnotes

I was going to post about Whitehawk more than a year ago after I volunteered for the dig which took place there in August 2014. I refrained from doing so at the time as I was supposed to be photographing (for Brighton Museum) the ‘more interesting artefacts’ which they hoped to uncover in the process of the dig. Sadly, despite intensive digging in 3 separate areas on Whitehawk Hill nothing particularly interesting was found. Geo-physics had shown up some anomalies on the Southern side of the hill which the archaeologists hoped might be a fifth outer ring, but this proved to be unfounded. Most of the very small things found were pieces of worked flints (possibly Neolithic), masses of broken glass, the inevitable willow-pattern ceramics shards and miscellaneous bits of ironware which were probably bits of broken gardening tools (most of the hill has been given over to allotments in the past and still is today). I personally found a 1945 farthing which back then would have bought you a whole house in Brighton. The other thing that was found in abundance were pieces of relatively modern cars and scooters which is quite interesting in itself. The practice of sacrificing expensive offerings to the gods on this site was still happening in the here and now, a clearly continuing tradition, except now they like to torch them first rather than burying them or flinging them into a watery place.

As stated in older posts there’s not much to suggest that you’re standing in a Causewayed Enclosure when you’re up there as most of it has been encroached upon by modern progress, allotments and the enlargement of Brighton Race Course, but here and there you’ll notice a slight undulation, a small squeak to remind you of the sheer scale of the site. The positioning of it too, is wonderful and a true focal point, commanding expansive views over the sea and South Downs of which it forms part. The panoramic images posted here were commissioned recently by Brighton Museum for educational purposes to highlight the importance of this truly ancient and wonderful place.

West Kennett Avenue (Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue) — Images

<b>West Kennett Avenue</b>Posted by A R Cane

Avebury (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Avebury</b>Posted by A R Cane
Showing 1-50 of 1,063 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
I'm a professional photographer living in West Sussex and have been interested in ancient sites since childhood. I was brought up near Barbury Castle in Wiltshire so visits to hill forts, stone circles and various lumps and bumps were routine. The grip of these fantastic places still has a hold on me and I still get a feeling of total wellbeing whenever I come across a new place or revisit familiar places. Much of that is to do with the magnificent or interesting locations in which they're found and equally the mystery attached to them - we know so little and can imagine so much.

http://www.landtraces.com

My TMA Content: