The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Get the TMA Images feed
drewbhoy

Latest Posts
Showing 1-50 of 7,208 posts. Most recent first | Next 50

Carn Mor (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

From the School Wood car park at Farr I headed south on the B851 until I reached Tomintoul House and asked permission to park, which was kindly given. The River Brin runs next to the road on which I headed south until Achvraid, at which point I headed west across a stunningly green pasture, jumped a wee burn and clambered up hill. At first through a boggy grassy area and then surprisingly dry heather. Keep going until it flattens out then head south following a fence. A wonderful place to walk with superb views of Strathnairn.

This fence finds another fence heading north west, follow this for about 60/70 meters and look for a mound amongst the heather, this is the cairn. It is always quite a strange feeling, to me, walking amongst heather when across the valley the hills are bare rock, in this case Stac Gorm and An Torr, almost like the west and east coasts of the Outer Hebrides.

Set amongst barely visible hut circles the cairn can be spotted thanks to the fact that it has been houked. Also helping are two visible kerbs standing out against the brown landscape. It stands at almost 8m wide and is around 0.7m tall, sitting to the south west of Carn Mor's rocky summit.

What a place, what a view, what a climb down to Dhuallow, far down to the south west in the valley below in lovely summery weather.

Visited 6/7/2017.

Sgarasta (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Sgarasta</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Sgarasta</b>Posted by drewbhoy

The Macleod Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>The Macleod Stone</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Macleod Stone</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Macleod Stone</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Dun Stuaidh (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Dun Stuaidh</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Farr Church (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Just south of the village of Inverarnie, on the B851, and Farr Primary School I parked in the car park at School Wood. This wood is a wonderful idea for pupils to discover the woodlands and wildlife. Set up with European funds there is a wildlife hut open to the public to see what goes on with the promotion of nature in primary school education.

After a good look at the display I headed north on the track until it ran out, climbed two deer fences and headed slightly west. The cairn is easy to spot. Some kerbs still poke their heads through the turf on a cairn that has been damaged by ploughing. With beautiful views especially to the east and south the cairn remains at 10m wide and 0.8m tall. Farr Church is on the other side of the road to the east.

A fine way to start the day despite the deer fences.

Visited 6/7/2017.

Brin School (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

From the farmhouse at Creag An Tuirc simply cross the road into the field opposite. At the far end of the field is the River Nairn and the sheer cliffs of Brin Hill.

Brin 1 NH6632128956
The first and largest of the barrows nearest the road is almost 10m wide and 0.6m tall.

Brin 2 NH6630528942
The next barrow is smaller and squarer being 6m tall and 0.4m tall. A couple of stones that appear to be kerbs are more likely to be displaced stones.

Brin 3 NH6629628952
The smallest of the barrows being 5m and wide 0.3 tall. It is circular and has received some houking treatment.

Brin 4 NH6687228929
The second largest barrow is 8m long, 4m wide and is over 0.5m tall. It has a more rectangular shape than the others. The surrounding ditch is also more noticeable.

Brin 5 NH6630428933
This barrow is just over 5m wide and is 0.4m tall. It also has received some houking.

These barrows are set in a lovely location next to the old Brin School with wonderful views up and down Strath Nairn. Across the road is the hillfort and further down the road the start of the next hike. An end to an exhausting but fantastic day walking in the hills east of Loch Ness.

Visited 1/7/2017.

The Milking Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

The Milking Stone is where the St Kildans used to pour milk for the 'gruagach', either on Sundays or after the first milking in spring, when they heard the fairies under the stone rattling their spoons.

Information from RCAHMS (ARG) 6 June 2008

The Milking Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>The Milking Stone</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Preas Mairi (Chambered Cairn) — Images

<b>Preas Mairi</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Preas Mairi</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Preas Mairi</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Preas Mairi</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Burghead (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Burghead</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Toe Head (Broch) — Miscellaneous

The headland was also an important landmark over 2,000 years ago, as it was the site of a 'broch' a large and impressive tower of two or three storeys that served as an Iron Age chieftain's residence. All that now remains is the circular foundation course, partly build over by the chapel. All of its other stonework has been removed, probably re-used in the construction of the nearby buildings including the chapel. One or more possible lines of enclosure on the landward side across the narrowest part of the promontory may also been part of the defensive strategy.

In earlier prehistoric times, up to 5,000 years ago, people left enigmatic 'cup marks' (small circular depressions) on the rocky ledges of the headland. 500 metres along the shore are the eroding remains of their settlements, which had been occupied periodically since the time of the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.

Notice Board at site.

Toe Head (Broch) — Images

<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Toe Head</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Rodel R141 (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Rodel R141</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Rodel R141</b>Posted by drewbhoy

S64, Scarista (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>S64, Scarista</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>S64, Scarista</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>S64, Scarista</b>Posted by drewbhoy
Showing 1-50 of 7,208 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Still doing the music, following that team, drinking far to much and getting lost in the hills! (Some Simple Minds, Glasvegas, Athlete, George Harrison, Empire Of The Sun, Nazareth on the headphones, good boots and sticks, away I go!)

(The Delerium Trees)

Protect your heritage!

My TMA Content: