The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Buinen

Complex

<b>Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamiltonImage © Les Hamilton
Latitude:52° 55' 32.36" N
Longitude:   6° 48' 41.67" E

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D28 Buinen Hunebed
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D29 Buinen Hunebed

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<b>Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton

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Just two kilometers out of Borger as you drive east towards Buinen, if you look to you right, in a sandy field, you will clearly see D28 and D29 in their own little state-owned space.

Indeed, all hunebedden except the ruinous one at Westernesch are nationally maintained. It gave me a little thrill of excitement that I had found this one so easily. It was quite discreetly signposted and might easily have been missed.

A short stroll of 50ms or so from the car and you approach to D29 first. D28 lies just 10 or 15ms beyond it. They are both very similarly sized, both having clearly originally having three capstones, but now both only have two. This two-for-the-price-of-one double whammy of hunebedden!
Jane Posted by Jane
30th July 2007ce

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Hans Meijer's Dolmens in the Netherlands


Jane Posted by Jane
30th July 2007ce

Latest posts for Buinen

Showing 1-10 of 17 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

D29 Buinen (Hunebed) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
3rd February 2017ce

D29 Buinen (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 3, 2011

Hunebed D29 Buinen stands just 37 metres south of its twin, D28, in the same wooded area. Measuring 7.5 × 3.1 metres, this passage grave consists of a full set of eight sidestones and two endstones and still possesses two of its original three capstones and a two stone entrance portal.

Interestingly, these capstones (one of which has slipped into the interior of the grave) are exceptionally flat, and some archaeologists consider that they were once part of the same erratic boulder. If this is the case, then the hunebed builders must have possessed advanced fission techniques in order to be able to cleave the boulder in two. How is unknown, but one suggestion is that the boulder could have been repeatedly heated by fire then cooled with water until it cracked in two; another is that wedges could have been driven into existing cracks. It is a fact that many of the hunebedden throughout Drenthe are built from stones with almost perfectly flat sides.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
3rd February 2017ce

D28 Buinen (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
2nd February 2017ce

D28 Buinen (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 3, 2011

Hunebed D28 Buinen is a medium sized monument with impressively bukly capstones. It measures 7.5 metres long by 3.4 metres wide, and is almost complete, consisting of a full set of eight sidestones and two endstones. The easternmost of the original four capstones is missing but the other three remain firmly on their supports.

Although this hunebed lies within the administrative area of the village of Buinen, it actually lies much closer to the town of Borger than to Buinen, and can be reached by following the main N374 highway for exactly one kilometre eastward from its junction with Hoofdstraat (in Borger). A walk of under 15 minutes takes you past the Vakanzieparck Hunzedal recreation park, where, on the south of the highway, surrounded by arable farmland, lies a small grassy area surrounded by mature trees. The hunebed is clearly visible beneath these trees, just 110 metres from the roadside, with its twin, D29 a further 37 metres to the south. (Note: D28 is the northernmost of this hunebed pair, and is the one you encounter first: not D29 as stated by Jane)

During a 1927 investigation of D28, Albert van Giffen discovered—in addition to the usual finds of pottery and flints—two coils of copper wire, which proved to be the oldest pieces metal jewelry ever found in Dutch soil. The copper coils indicate that some objects in use by the Funnel Beaker farmers had come from distant places, since these rings most likely originated from somewhere in either central or southwest Europe.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
2nd February 2017ce

D28 Buinen (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by Billy Fear<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by Billy Fear Billy Fear Posted by Billy Fear
18th February 2009ce
Showing 1-10 of 17 posts. Most recent first | Next 10