The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

The Netherlands

Country

<b>The Netherlands</b>Posted by JaneD1 Steenbergen © Jane Tomlinson
The code indicates the province in which the site lies:
D = Drenthe, G = Groningen.
Also known as:
  • Nederland

See individual sites for details

Added by TMA Ed

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Web searches for Netherlands

Sites/Regions:

3 posts
Borger Round Cairn
6 posts
5 sites
Bronneger Complex
4 posts
Bronneger Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
2 sites
Buinen Complex
12 posts
D10 Gasteren Hunebed
12 posts
D11 Anloo Hunebed
8 posts
D12 Eext Hunebed
10 posts
D13 Eext Hunebed
15 posts
D14 Eexterhalte Hunebed
9 posts
D15 Loon Hunebed
12 posts
D16 Balloo Hunebed
13 posts
D1 Steenbergen Hunebed
8 posts
D26 Drouwenerveld Hunebed
19 posts
D27 Borger Hunebed
7 posts
D2 Westervelde Hunebed
10 posts
D30 Exloo Hunebed
12 posts
D31 Exloo Hunebed
11 posts
D32 Odoorn Hunebed
3 posts
D33 Valtherveld Hunebed (Destroyed)
11 posts
D34 Valthe Hunebed
8 posts
D35 Valthe Hunebed
11 posts
D41 Emmermeer Hunebed
7 posts
D42 Emmeres Hunebed
15 posts
D43 Schimeres Hunebed
8 posts
D44 Westenesch Hunebed
10 posts
D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen) Hunebed
10 posts
D46 Emmen (Angelslo) Hunebed
8 posts
D47 Emmen (Angelslo) Hunebed
6 posts
D48 Stone of Noordbarge Natural Rock Feature
17 posts
D49 Schoonoord Hunebed
15 posts
D50 Noord sleen Hunebed
9 posts
D51 Noord sleen Hunebed
9 posts
D52 Diever Hunebed
10 posts
D5 Zeijen Hunebed
13 posts
D6 Tynaarlo Hunebed
10 posts
D7 Kniphorstbos Hunebed
3 posts
D8a/b Kniphorstbos Hunebed (Destroyed)
10 posts
D8 Kniphorstbos Hunebed
11 posts
D9 Noordlo Hunebed
3 posts
Driemarkenpunt Round Cairn
1 post
2 sites
Drouwen Complex
5 posts
Eppiesbergje Round Cairn
5 posts
Eupen Barchien Round Cairn
5 posts
Exloo Zuideres Round Cairn
11 posts
G1 Noordlaren Hunebed
3 posts
G5 Heveskesklooster Hunebed
4 posts
Galgenberg (Balloërveld) Round Cairn
5 posts
Galgenberg (Sleenerzand) Round Cairn
5 posts
Galgenberg (Strubben-Kniphorstbos) Round Cairn
2 sites
Havelteberg Complex
3 posts
Heveskesklooster Cist
11 posts
Hoorneboegse Heide Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
4 posts
Mandenberg Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
2 sites
Midlaren Complex
6 posts
Norg Kerk Hunebed
4 posts
2 sites
Rolde Complex
3 posts
Stakenberg (Balloërveld) Round Cairn
4 posts
2 sites
Valthe Complex
1 post
3 sites
Valther Forest, Emmen Complex
3 posts
9 sites
Westerheide Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
10 posts
Zeven Bergjes Barrow / Cairn Cemetery

News

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IA grave found in Alkmaar town centre


Archaeologists digging in the Paardenmarkt (Horse market) square in the centre of the Dutch town of Alkmaar have discovered a prehistoric grave.

The remains show a person buried in the crouched position, which is typical of the Iron Age... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th August 2010ce

Folklore

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My 17th Century Dutch isn't so good but I can still look at the illustrations in Johan Picardt's 1660 book "Korte beschyvinge van eenige vergetene en verborgene Antiquiteten" eg here, here and here. Mr Picardt is considered the founding father of the study of archaeology in the Netherlands. The drawings seem to show the hunebedden being built by giants and dwarfs. But the dwarfs seem to get the raw end of the deal as the giants end up eating them. That's certainly what it looks like at any rate. Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th November 2011ce
Edited 15th November 2011ce

Throughout Europe and even adjacent areas there was the widespread belief in thunderstones. These peculiar stones (prehistoric flint and stone axes) were thought to have crashed into the earth during a lightning strike. Although nowadays this superstition has largely vanished, it was still widely accepted in the first half of the 20th century.

Deinse* describes this situation for the Dutch province of Overijssel, directly south of Drenthe. He reports that virtually every farmer has at least one prehistoric axe at his farm. They were believed to protect the house against lightning, as lightning never strikes the same place twice. He even reported that particular axes were believed to possess special powers. Small bits of stone were scraped off these axes and were given to children as a medicine against convulsions.
Deinse, J.J. (1925): Uit het Land van Katoen en Heide - Oudheidkundige en Folkloristische schetsen uit Twente. p102-111

This is from p25 of 'Ceci n'est pas une hache. Neolithic Depositions in the Northern Netherlands' by Karsten Wentink, 2006 - which you can read online at Google Books - it has lots of Serious archaeological information and discussion in it.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th September 2007ce
Edited 12th September 2007ce

Links

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Hunebedden Wijzer


This excellent site (in Dutch) presents a page of thumbnail images of all the Dutch hunebedden.

Clicking on any of these images opens a page dedicated to that hunebed, presenting a photogallery of images, a Google Map with marker, plus thumbnail links to other hunebedden in the vicinity.

In some instances, there is also a short YouTube video showing the hunebed in its surroundings.

Informative, and very much recommended.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
26th April 2014ce
Edited 26th April 2014ce

Jon Kuipers Hunebed Map of Drenthe


This interactive map bears numbered markers, each of which, when clicked, opens up an information page about a specific hunebed.

Not only is there informative text (in English), but also attractive photographs of each hunebed, a ground plan of the stones, and a location map.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
26th April 2014ce
Edited 26th April 2014ce

Hunebedden in the Netherlands


Click the above link to display a Google Map indicating the locations of all 54 Hunebedden in the Netherlands.

Each marker is clickable, offering a table of information about its hunebed.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
26th April 2014ce
Edited 26th April 2014ce

Scribd.


Full copy of "Megalith Research in the Netherlands, 1547-1911" by Jan Albert Bakker (2010), including plans of many of the Hunebeds.
Posted by TMA Ed
2nd June 2013ce

Latest posts for the Netherlands

Showing 1-10 of 695 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

D29 Buinen (Hunebed) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D29 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
3rd February 2017ce

D29 Buinen (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 3, 2011

Hunebed D29 Buinen stands just 37 metres south of its twin, D28, in the same wooded area. Measuring 7.5 × 3.1 metres, this passage grave consists of a full set of eight sidestones and two endstones and still possesses two of its original three capstones and a two stone entrance portal.

Interestingly, these capstones (one of which has slipped into the interior of the grave) are exceptionally flat, and some archaeologists consider that they were once part of the same erratic boulder. If this is the case, then the hunebed builders must have possessed advanced fission techniques in order to be able to cleave the boulder in two. How is unknown, but one suggestion is that the boulder could have been repeatedly heated by fire then cooled with water until it cracked in two; another is that wedges could have been driven into existing cracks. It is a fact that many of the hunebedden throughout Drenthe are built from stones with almost perfectly flat sides.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
3rd February 2017ce

D28 Buinen (Hunebed) — Images

<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>D28 Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
2nd February 2017ce

D28 Buinen (Hunebed) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 3, 2011

Hunebed D28 Buinen is a medium sized monument with impressively bukly capstones. It measures 7.5 metres long by 3.4 metres wide, and is almost complete, consisting of a full set of eight sidestones and two endstones. The easternmost of the original four capstones is missing but the other three remain firmly on their supports.

Although this hunebed lies within the administrative area of the village of Buinen, it actually lies much closer to the town of Borger than to Buinen, and can be reached by following the main N374 highway for exactly one kilometre eastward from its junction with Hoofdstraat (in Borger). A walk of under 15 minutes takes you past the Vakanzieparck Hunzedal recreation park, where, on the south of the highway, surrounded by arable farmland, lies a small grassy area surrounded by mature trees. The hunebed is clearly visible beneath these trees, just 110 metres from the roadside, with its twin, D29 a further 37 metres to the south. (Note: D28 is the northernmost of this hunebed pair, and is the one you encounter first: not D29 as stated by Jane)

During a 1927 investigation of D28, Albert van Giffen discovered—in addition to the usual finds of pottery and flints—two coils of copper wire, which proved to be the oldest pieces metal jewelry ever found in Dutch soil. The copper coils indicate that some objects in use by the Funnel Beaker farmers had come from distant places, since these rings most likely originated from somewhere in either central or southwest Europe.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
2nd February 2017ce

Buinen (Complex) — Images

<b>Buinen</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
1st February 2017ce

Westerheide 8 and 9 (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Westerheide 8 and 9</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
18th July 2016ce
Showing 1-10 of 695 posts. Most recent first | Next 10