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East Riding of Yorkshire

<b>East Riding of Yorkshire</b>Posted by thesweetcheatImage © A. Brookes (19.9.2010)
Also known as:
  • East Yorkshire

See individual sites for details

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Web searches for East Riding of Yorkshire

Sites in this group:

1 post
Arras Barrow Cemetery Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
10 posts
Ba'l Hill Artificial Mound
2 posts
Butt Hills Round Barrow(s)
9 posts
Callis Wold Barrow Cemetery Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
1 post
Catton Henge Henge
Cheesecake Hill Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Collinswood Farm Round Barrow(s)
11 posts
Dane's Dyke Dyke
2 posts
Dane's Graves Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
1 post
Easington Beach Barrow Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Easington Beach Henge Henge
5 posts
Fairy Stones Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Fimber Cursus Cursus
4 posts
Garrowby Hill Top and Garrowby Wold Round Barrow(s)
12 posts
8 sites
The Gypsey Race
1 post
Hen Pit Hole Sacred Well
Highfield Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Kemp Howe Long Barrow
Kilham Long Barrow
13 posts
Kirkheads Round Barrow(s) (Destroyed)
Littlewood Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
8 posts
Millington Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
Newbald Lodge Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
3 posts
Paddock Hill Hillfort
2 posts
Skipsea Castle Artificial Mound
15 posts
Star Carr Mesolithic site
2 posts
St Austin's Stone Natural Rock Feature
3 posts
Wallis Grange Long Barrow
Warram Percy Wold Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Westwood Bowl Barrow Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Wetwang Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
Willerby Wold House Round Barrow(s)
27 posts
Willy Howe Artificial Mound
Sites of disputed antiquity:
1 post
Barmby Moor Standing Stone / Menhir

News

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'Hugely important' iron age remains found at Yorkshire site


Update on an archaeological dig at Pocklington....


Almost 2,000 years after being buried, the remarkably well-preserved remains of 150 skeletons and their personal possessions have been discovered in a small market town at the foot of the Yorkshire Wolds... continues...
moss Posted by moss
18th March 2016ce

Skeletons and jewellery in square barrows come from Iron Age East Yorkshire tribe


Archaeologists say dozens of square barrows found in an East Yorkshire market town contained the skeletons and goods of people from the Arras Culture, living in the region in the Middle Iron Age between the 1st century BC and the Roman invasion... continues...
moss Posted by moss
2nd April 2015ce
Edited 2nd April 2015ce

English pre-history photographic exhibition at The Treasure House, Beverley, East Yorkshire.


A bit of shameless self-promotion here.

Alison and I have an exhibition of our work titled 'Traces' at The Treasure House, Beverley, East Yorkshire opening on Saturday 4th August and finishing Saturday 29th September. the link below takes you to a pdf from the museum website and we're on page 6... continues...
A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
2nd August 2012ce
Edited 2nd August 2012ce

North Sea wind firms could unearth archaeology


OFFSHORE wind farms could help reveal the ancient secrets of East Yorkshire.

Archaeologists believe plans to connect a network of huge wind farms in the North Sea to an existing sub-station in Cottingham offer the chance to unearth dozens of previously unknown settlements... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
7th March 2011ce

IA Goddess figurine returns to East Yorks


EAST Yorkshire's oldest lady has come home – after a 21-year absence.
The Iron Age representation of a woman was sent to experts at the British Museum in 1989.

Staff at Hull Council's archaeology department assumed it had been returned and was somewhere in their stores... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
24th August 2010ce

Cattle ranching in Yorkshire BC


(from the Yorkshire Post)

ARCHAEOLOGISTS believe they have solved a 50-year-old riddle about Iron Age remains in the Yorkshire Wolds.

For years they were puzzled by lines stretching more than 16 miles across chalky hillside near the village of Weaverthorpe... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
28th October 2002ce
Edited 13th May 2016ce

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<b>East Riding of Yorkshire</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>East Riding of Yorkshire</b>Posted by Chris Collyer

Latest posts for East Riding of Yorkshire

Showing 1-10 of 247 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Cursuses relating to the Rudston Monolith


The Rudston cursus group consists of four cursuses stretching along the bottom and sides of the Great Wold Valley. At least one end of each of the monument are to be found on the elevated chalk ridges which surround Rudston. The valley contains the Gypsey Race, one of the rare streams across the chalklands, and two of the cursuses (A and C) cross this stream. The Rudston group contains an unparalleled concentration of cursus monuments. Cursus A is the southern most of the group. The southern end of the cursus survives as an earthwork and the remainder is visible on air photographs as two parallel ditches. The cursus is 2700 metres long by circa 58 metres, it tapers to 41 metres at the south terminal. Cursus A is the only one of the group where both ends are visible, both of the terminals are square in plan. The earthwork was excavated in the mid 19th century by Greenwell and showed what appeared to be a round barrow raised upon the surface of a long mound. This excavation produced six burials (two with Beakers), only one of which Greenwell considered to be primary, and a considerable amount of pottery. These burials were inserted into the south end of the cursus monument in the early bronze age. Greenwell also found sherds of earlier Neolithic pottery, along with worked flint and animal bones on the ground surface beneath the bank of the cursus. A second excavation across the west ditch in 1958 recovered 24 small pieces of Beaker pottery from the bottom 18 inches of the ditch fill, excluding the primary fill, and 4 larger pieces from the primary fill. There is evidence to suggest that the ditch was recut at this point explaining the presence of the later pottery.
moss Posted by moss
30th September 2017ce

Beacon Cursus — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Beacon Cursus</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

25/09/2017 – We had popped down to Scarborough for a long weekend just for a bit of walking really. A few days before we came I noticed that we weren’t too far from Rudston so we crammed 3 days of walking into 2, leaving our last day free for a visit to this mega monolith.

Easy enough to get to by car but we were on the bus, which still wasn’t too tricky. Morning 121 bus from Scarborough to Burton Agnes and then a 3 mile or so walk down quietish country roads to Rudston.

We arrived at the south side of the church and had a little debate as to which way round the church we wanted to go for our first sight of the stone. These things are important I think, it’s not every day you get to see the tallest standing stone in Britain for the first time. We chose clockwise.

Rounding the corner of the building and there it stood in all its glory. It really is impressive and as wonderful as I hoped it would be. It seemed to grow and grow as we edged closer. It was hard not to just keep staring at it. So solid and timeless. I know the church and graveyard setting isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but I quite liked it and loved the difference in height between the monolith and the similar shaped gravestones round it.

After having a look at the small stone and cist in the corner (it looked a little sad hidden away and dark with the overhead leaves at this time of year) we sat across the road on a bench and had our butties.

The inside of the church is worth a look and has a small display about the history of the area.

After one last look at the stone we started the slow walk back to the bus stop. We kept an eye out for any sign of the cursus that crosses the road to the south of Rudston but no luck. Did manage to find a coffee shop in Burton Agnes which helped with the wait for the bus.

Top day out and the Rudston monolith is a must see site.

Happy us on the bus back to Scarborough for an evening of chips and gravy and two penny falls.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce
Edited 2nd October 2017ce

Garrowby Hill Top and Garrowby Wold (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

The other nearby barrows are Cot Nab Farm SE813567 and South Wold Farm SE821570. None of which I could see during a 'drive by' due to the hedge and the fields being in crop (wheat) Posted by CARL
8th August 2017ce

Skipsea Castle (Artificial Mound) — Fieldnotes

Visited 5.8.17

Directions:
In the village of Skipsea. Signposted as it is an English Heritage site. You can park near the field gate which gives access to the site. You walk across a field and then through a second gate. The field had a herd of cows in it.

My main reason for visiting was to knock off another English Heritage site. I have been to many motte and bialy castles over the years but this is one of the most impressive. Both the motte and bails are very large. The views from the top of the motte are impressive over the surrounding flat countryside. I would heartily recommend visiting the site - just watch out for the cow pats!
Posted by CARL
7th August 2017ce

Collinswood Farm (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 30.7.17

Directions:
East of Sledmere on the B1253

The field was in crop (wheat). The barrow could still be made out as a low, long mound. It is only a matter of time until it has been completely ploughed out.
Posted by CARL
6th August 2017ce

Sands Wood (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Drive by 30.7.17

I didn't have time for a proper visit so was hoping to spot the barrow via a 'drive by'. Unfortunately the wood is quite dense with plenty of vegetation so I failed to spot it. Nice spot though for someone to have a proper look.
Posted by CARL
6th August 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Visited 1.8.17

Looking at my previous fieldnote I am back here exactly 2 years later - I had no idea!

When you are anywhere near the area of this hugely impressive stone you just have to visit. And it is just as impressive the second time around (no doubt also the third, fourth, fifth etc).

All was quiet in the churchyard (we were the only visitors), the sun was shining, the birds chirping - very peaceful on this late summer evening.

The stone still dominates the church, as it has always done. Rudstone is one of those special places that everyone should try to visit at least once in their lives.

*** Don't forget to check out the cist and Roman coffin lid in the corner of the churchyard under the trees.
Posted by CARL
6th August 2017ce

Kemp Howe (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Visited 30.7.17

Directions:
A short distance east of Sledmere, next to the B1253.


Although the field was still in crop (wheat) it was just about possible to spot the barrow as a long, low 'bump'. No doubt that within a few years it will have been completely ploughed out.

If you are in the area take time to visit the fantastic First World War memorial in Sledmere. It is also next to the B1253. A superb piece of stone masonry which tells an important story.
Posted by CARL
1st August 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 247 posts. Most recent first | Next 10