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Eire

<b>Eire</b>Posted by CursuswalkerThe Banqueting Hall © Cursuswalker
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News

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History of Ireland in 100 0bjects on postage stamps


http://100objects.ie/stamps/

An Post’s Ninth Definitive Stamp Series, A History of Ireland in 100 Objects, a selection, began life as an original series by Fintan O’Toole of The Irish Times... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
28th May 2018ce
Edited 28th May 2018ce

Bear bone discovery pushes back date of human existence in Ireland by 2,500 years


Scientists were astounded when tests showed the fragment, from a butchered brown bear, confirmed that humans were active in Ireland 2,500 years earlier than previously suspected... continues...
ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd March 2016ce

Ancient remains found in Midlands bog


An ancient bog body has been discovered at a midland bog where a similar find was made two years ago.
The remains were found by a Bord na Móna worker at Rossan Bog on the Meath/Westmeath border on Saturday morning... continues...
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th September 2014ce

Review of Rewriting the (Pre) history of Ulster - Dr Rowan McLaughlin


This is a write-up of a talk given by Dr Rowan McLaughlin regarding how the 4000+ developer produced RC dates since 2001 in Ireland basically rewrite whole swathes of how we perceive the prehistory of Ireland.

http://rmchapple.blogspot.co... continues...
juamei Posted by juamei
29th June 2014ce

World's oldest bog body hints at violent past


Cashel Man has had the weight of the world on his shoulders, quite literally, for 4,000 years.

Compressed by the peat that has preserved his remains, he looks like a squashed, dark leather holdall... continues...
ryaner Posted by ryaner
25th September 2013ce
Edited 29th September 2013ce

Co Laois bog body is world's oldest


New tests on the remains of a preserved body found in a Co Laois bog have revealed that it is the oldest bog body ever discovered in the world.

The body was found by a Bord na Móna worker milling peat in 2011.

It was initially believed that the remains were those of a young female which were around 2,500 years old... continues...
ryaner Posted by ryaner
3rd August 2013ce

Archaeologists warn against delisting of post-1700 historical structures


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0916/1224304193570... continues...
bogman Posted by bogman
16th September 2011ce
Edited 16th September 2011ce

Stone Circles

This quarter's 'Archaeology Ireland' has a three page feature on Stone Circles, by Muiris O'Sullivan and Liam Downey.

"The architecture and orientation of stone circles were inherently symbolic, reflecting in a fundamental way a sense of spirituality and belief in the otherworld..."

So there you are.
gjrk Posted by gjrk
15th March 2011ce

Newbuildings time team to excavate ancient Rath


Londonderry Sentinel
By Olga Bradshaw - 21st January 2009


MEMBERS of Newbuildings and District Archaeological and Historical Society are eagerly awaiting the results of a new survey scheduled to take place this week, to discover what lies beneath a rath which has been discovered in the village... continues...
moss Posted by moss
22nd January 2009ce

Grassy mounds our earliest breweries, claim archaeologists


by Sarah Stack (Irish Examiner 11 August 2007)

'Bronze age Irish men were as fond of their beer as their 21st century counterparts, it was claimed yesterday.

Two Galway archaeologists have put forward a theory that one of the most common ancient monuments around Ireland may have been used for brewing ale... continues...
gjrk Posted by gjrk
13th August 2007ce
Edited 30th September 2008ce

Ireland not ruled out as Atlantis by museum

Contrary to press reports in August, the National Museum of Ireland did not rule out that Ireland could have been Atlantis (Full text). The previous reports were apparently the result of quoting out of context.

There is a new website for the theory now, AtlantisInIreland.com, which includes a blog and an invitation to a real time debate.
Posted by odysseus
11th December 2004ce
Edited 13th December 2004ce

Irish Times: Historic sites Bill likely to face legal challenge


Daniel McConnell

The Irish Times
17 June 2004

Opponents of newly-published legislation, which will give the Government power to proceed with road projects which interfere with national monuments after archaeological works are carried out, have threatened to challenge the legislation in the courts... continues...
Posted by otuathail3
19th June 2004ce
Edited 22nd June 2004ce

Irish Independent: 'Ill-conceived' bill threatens heritage sites


Irish Independent
17.06.04

Save Tara!

IMPORTANT archaeological sites, including Ireland's oldest Viking settlement, will be threatened if the Government's proposed amendment to the National Monuments Bill is passed, heritage activists said yesterday... continues...
Posted by otuathail3
19th June 2004ce
Edited 12th April 2006ce

Irish Examiner: Cullen 'failing to protect heritage sites'


Irish Examiner
17/06/04


By Jim Morahan

HERITAGE groups yesterday accused Environment Minister Martin Cullen of
failing to protect national monuments... continues...
Posted by otuathail3
19th June 2004ce
Edited 22nd June 2004ce

Labour describes Monuments Bill as 'official vandalism'


TaraWatch

Irish Times
Marie O'Halloran
18.06.04

A Bill to allow for the completion of the M50 motorway at Carrickmines will legalise "official vandalism" of national monuments, the Labour Party's environment spokesman has claimed... continues...
Posted by otuathail3
19th June 2004ce
Edited 12th April 2006ce

Monuments Bill 'legal vandalism' claims Labour


Monuments Bill 'legal vandalism' claims Labour

Irish Independent
18.06.04

continues...
Posted by otuathail3
19th June 2004ce
Edited 12th April 2006ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
Old traditions, crumbling with time..

I suspect that this news comes in defence of folklore which in turn preserves the archaeological monuments by superstition or 'piseogs' to use the rather lovely Irish word.........



Superstitions may seem strange and baseless, but somehow they have clung on for thousands of years. Are they a sign of respect for the past and if so just how much longer might they last?

WHEN I WAS growing up, there was a ring fort at the end of our road. We were warned not to play there. It was accepted that fairy forts contained some mystique or potential for harm. Our parents were probably told the same by their parents, and so on through the generations. But has belief in science and technology replaced faith in superstitions?

Perhaps not. Dara Molloy, a former Roman Catholic priest based on Inis Mór, is in demand to perform Celtic rituals and blessings. When we spoke last week, he was at a wedding ceremony in which he used blessings dating from what he terms "Celtic Christianity". It involves the tying of knots and sprinkling of water from a nearby well. These practices predate the Roman Catholic Church, he says, and are more in keeping with old Irish customs and beliefs. "We held on to a lot of traditions but they were pushed to the margins of the church," he says. "People still visit holy wells, climb Croagh Patrick or go to Lough Derg, but many other Irish customs and traditions didn't carry on and some local priests were instrumental in encouraging them to be abandoned."

Molloy says when he first moved to the Aran Islands 25 years ago, he was struck by the reverence the locals had for ancient sites and monuments. "Neighbours of mine on Inis Mór who were born and raised on the island had never been up to the hill fort of Dún Aengus," he says. "One of the reasons given was that their parents wouldn't let them. They said the place was lived in by the sióga or other world folk. Nowadays some young locals want to have their weddings up there because they believe the energy of the sióga is there. The belief hasn't been lost. It is just used differently. I have witnessed young adults who want to go to Dún Aengus and sleep there overnight to get the feeling that is up there."

That feeling may relate to the fact the site has been used by locals for centuries as a place of gathering or safety.

Piseogs [superstitions] are still heeded on the islands too, says Molloy. That is why a red-haired woman who turns up at a door on New Year's Eve is unlikely to be shown indoors. "It would be a bad omen for the coming years," he says.

Colm Moloney, managing director of Headland Archaeology, says much has been lost in recent years in relation to Irish folklore. "My own childhood revolved around my dad, who spent a lot of his time walking his greyhounds (and his children) around the landscape of east Cork. Every hill, river, nook and cranny had a story attached to it and he told them so well it was captivating," he says. "Modern Ireland does not readily facilitate this kind of activity. Landowners have a problem with people wandering across their land and kids have so much to distract them, it is near impossible to get them outside."

Moloney says much of our folklore is in danger in the hands of the current generation. "The Irish psyche has changed. The respect that was there for the past is losing ground. Our knowledge and links to the past through oral traditions were what made us unique."

There have been reports recently that a farmer destroyed a ring fort in Co Cork. This would not have occurred a decade ago, he says. Folklore often existed to protect the built heritage and vice versa.

"Every country boy knew the traditions associated with ring forts," he says. "If you touched the fairy forts something very bad would happen to you. This tradition and similar kinds of piseog resulted in the preservation of archaeological monuments across the country, probably for thousands of years.

"This is a frightening development, where 30 sq m of farmland is of greater value than a monument that may have stood on that spot for 1,200 years."


EMILY ROSS


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/features/2011/0104/1224286698278.html
moss Posted by moss
4th January 2011ce
Edited 4th January 2011ce

The Fairy Music

THE evil influence of the fairy glance does not kill, but it throws the object into a death-like trance, in which the real body is carried off to some fairy mansion, while a log of wood, or some ugly, deformed creature is left in its place, clothed with the shadow of the stolen form.
Young women, remarkable for beauty, young men, and handsome children, are the chief victims of the fairy stroke. The girls are wedded to fairy chiefs, and the young men to fairy queens; and if the mortal children do not turn out well, they are sent back, and others carried off in their place.
It is sometimes possible, by the spells of a powerful fairy-man, to bring back a living being from Fairy-land. But they are never quite the same after. They have always a spirit-look, especially if they have listened to the fairy music. For the fairy music is soft and low and plaintive, with a fatal charm for mortal ears.


Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland By Lady Francesca Speranza Wilde

A huge collection of folklore and folk-magic from Oscar Wildes' mother.

View online at Google Books, Sacred-texts Com, or download this collection for your iPhone or iPod.
Chance Posted by Chance
19th July 2010ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

Irish National Folklore Collection


[T]he National Folklore Collection UCD, [is] an institute recognised as one of Europe’s largest archives of oral tradition and cultural history. Visitors to the Collection are invited to explore a large selection of books, manuscripts, audio recordings, videos and photographs, drawings and paintings dealing with Irish life, folk history and culture.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
6th December 2017ce

Voices from the Dawn


The folklore of Ireland's ancient monuments
ryaner Posted by ryaner
13th August 2012ce

Megalithic Monuments of Ireland.com


site index
wideford Posted by wideford
25th June 2011ce

Megalithomania


"Megalithomania is the story of one man's journey across 10 years (and counting) around the stones of Ireland. Tom Fourwinds' site is a catalogue of over 2200 sites, containing more than 10,000 photographs of Irish sites, and is a testament to his stamina and zeal."

Alan S.

http://heritageaction.wordpress.com/2011/03/28/web-focus-on-megalithomania/
Littlestone Posted by Littlestone
28th March 2011ce
Edited 9th June 2011ce

Ordnance Survey Ireland


Map viewer for Ireland - there are historical maps too.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th September 2010ce
Edited 15th September 2010ce

Newgrange, Boyne Valley, Ireland


Newgrange with Knowth and Dowth are the major sites of the Boyne Valley World Heritage Site. Images and information on Newgrange itself with visitor and tour information.
knowth Posted by knowth
16th June 2010ce

A Road on the Long Ridge


A Road on the Long Ridge - In search of an Ancient Highway on the Eiscar Riada by Hermann Geissel.
This is a free pdf book based on the TG4 program about a journey on the Eiscar Riada or Sli Mor from Dublin to Galway.
It is a great read and he also proposes that Early Christain sites were constructed beside the road for access etc.
It could also be argued that perhaps some of these were based on early prehistoric sites and therefore sites were located near the road.
It also has a section on Croghan Hill and it mentions the alignment of the Hill of Uisneach - Croghan Hill on Winter Solstice Sunrise.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
19th June 2007ce
Edited 19th June 2007ce

British Archaeology


Article from November/December 2005:

"Ireland's road network is experiencing an astonishing development, with sometimes controversial implications for the country's rich and largely unexplored rural heritage. Dàire O'Rourke, senior archaeologist at the National Roads Authority, says a new code means everyone will benefit."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
3rd February 2006ce
Edited 3rd February 2006ce

Megalithic Ireland as the inspiration for Plato's Atlantis


News and discussion about the book Atlantis from a Geographer's Perspective: Mapping the Fairy Land, by Ulf Erlingsson. A short video presents some of the intriguing details from the book.

The author considers that Plato's Atlantis was a utopia, but shows that with a probability of over 99.98%, Plato based the description of Atlantis' geography on Ireland.
Posted by odysseus
18th February 2005ce
Edited 19th February 2005ce

Mythical Ireland - new light on the ancient past


An exploration of Newgrange, Knowth, Dowth, Tara, Loughcrew and other ancient sites of Ireland in the context of art, astronomy, mythology and archaeology.
Posted by mythicalireland
19th March 2004ce
Edited 29th September 2004ce

Mythical Ireland


Spirals, lozenges and concentric circles in one of the world's hubs of megalithic art. Knowth, Dowth, Newgrange and Fourknocks sun-lit in their full glory!
Posted by Annexus Quam
10th March 2001ce
Edited 20th May 2005ce

Latest posts for Eire

Showing 1-10 of 12,096 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Drombeg (Stone Circle) — Folklore

The Stone Circle is situated two miles east of Glandore and half a mile south of Kilfaughnabeg Roman Catholic Church. It is composed of fourteen stones, arranged in the shape of a large circle. Some of the stones which form the circle are small and others tall. There is one horizontal stone inside the circle on the west side and if you stand on that stone with the rising of the sun on a May morning the sun points to a stone on the south east side of the circle and if you stand on the same horizontal stone on the morning of June 21st the sun points to a stone in the north east of the circle.

Some of the old people say that Cliodna is buried here and that each stone has certain meaning.

The stone circle was ancient when St Patrick came to Ireland and it is the unwritten history of our ancient civilisation.
Seán Ó Cárthaigh, as part of the 1930s Schools Collection of folklore. Digitised at Dúchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th October 2018ce

Castletimon (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

There is an Ogham stone on Castletimon road between Dunganstown and Ballinacarrig, and it is believed that a Queen was buried under it. There is no writing on it except lines and strokes. It is also believed that there is money under it. It is about two and a half yards long and two feet wide.

A story is told of a woman who took that stone to make a doorstep, but on the following morning she found it had returned to the place from which she had taken it.

Another story relates that when the Wicklow pier was being built, men were travelling through the county, gathering up big stones to help to build it, and a man named Dickenson now residing in Rathnew brought the Ogham stone in Co. Wicklow and wondering at the marks that were on it, showed it to a priest who told him to take it back to its former place. It is also believed that a priest explained the meaning of the marks thus:- "Here lieth a princess; she was possessed of the devil."
Kathleen Lott retells her grandfather's stories for the 1930s Schools Folklore Collection. dúchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th October 2018ce

Castleruddery (Stone Circle) — Folklore

This is the field on the opposite side of the road from the 'Druidical Circle' in Castleruddery Lower.

There is supposed to be a big crock of gold hidden in Tutty's Terrace field. The name of the man that put it there is Pat Kenny.

One time there were three men who went to dig up the gold. The names of those men were Tom Cullen, Peter Condron and Jim Toole. But when they dug down they met a big stone, and then a goat with three legs came running across the field. The men paid no heed to the goat. But when they went to raise the stone, the goat leaped in on them and killed one of the men. The other two jumped out and filled in the hole and no one made any more attempt to dig for the gold.

And another strange thing about that same place is that there is a light seen at three special times of the year. The light goes all around the place for about a quarter of an hour and then it disappears again.
Larry Daly recounting his father's stories in the 1930s, for the Schools Folklore Collection. Digitised at dúchas.ie
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th October 2018ce

Proleek (Portal Tomb) — Folklore

Proleek is suituated about four miles from Dundalk. To reach the big stone you have to travel over some fields before you arrive at the spot. There are three massive horizontal stones in shape on which the big stone rests which weighs a few tons. Not far away from the stone is the giant's grave.
The people of the district tell us, that if you can place three stones without falling on top of the big stone you will be married inside a year. Old people warn us to clear out of the place before 6'oclock or wee people will carry you away for ever.
It is said to be a great meeting place of the fairies. The old people tell us that they have often seen the small red man.
Collected from Betty Bowden of Drogheda, in the 1930s. Now digitised at Dúchas.ie.
Another informant says:
This is an outstanding monument in the district. In consists of three upright stones about eight feet in height supporting an enormous boulder of about 50 tons. It is locally called the giant's load and it is said the giant who put it up got his death of drinking of waters from the river these being poisoned by an enemy. Others say it is a monument over some mighty chieftain of old, but in truth little is known about its origin.

Giant's grave.
About 100 yards from the cromlech is an enclosure in the shape of a grave. It is locally called the "giant's grave" meaning of course that the giant who met his death as the result of the poisoned waters lies in it.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th October 2018ce

Moylisha (Portal Tomb) — Folklore

The name of the monument is variously given as Lob-in-a-sigh, Leaba an Sidh; on the Ordnance Survey map it is recorded as Labbanasigha. O'Donovan says the monument was called "Leaba na Saighe (Lectus canis venatica) where it is supposed a famous huntsman of old interred a favourite greyhound bitch." Perhaps it is not unreasonable to suggest in the light of the discovery of the javelin mould that the name may have some connection with the Irish word saighead (spearhead).
When the cairn was excavated, there were found two halves of a sandstone mould for a loop-socketed spear head, in the base of the cairn at the east end of the main chamber.

In 'The Moylisha Megalith, Co. Wicklow' by Gearóid Ó h-Iceadha, p119-128 in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Vol. 76, No. 3 (Oct., 1946).

There are many sites in Wales with 'Filiast' in their name: also meaning 'Greyhound Bitch'. I think Leaba an Sidh would mean the bed of the fairies?
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th October 2018ce

Corradooey (Court Tomb) — Fieldnotes

I had an appointment in a hotel in Letterkenny and it finished earlier than I had expected. Usually if I'm traveling that far I'll have done an itinerary and have my maps with me, but as I thought I'd be in the hotel until nightfall, I hadn't bothered. Now I had about 2 and a half hours of daylight to spare so I typed in Drumskinny stone circle into Google Maps and headed off. It was 50 minutes away and was going to add 30 minutes to my three hour journey home but what the hell.

I headed out the Letterkenny to Ballybofey road but was traveling almost blind as I'd never been in this part of the country. I kept pretty much to the GM directions but peered over any hedgerows I could to see if there were any wayward sites. After about 25 minutes and heading downhill towards some forestry I noticed a bunch of upright stones beside a field wall about 50 metres into a field on my left. I was fairly moving it but jammed on a bit past and out of sight of the site. The speed limit sign I parked beside was in mph and as I left the car and headed back, there was one in kph – I was right on the border.

The border-line runs right through this tomb. It is not mentioned in the Survey of the Megalithic Tombs of Ireland, Vol. VI, County Donegal but is mentioned in the Archaeological Inventory of County Donegal. It is very much a court tomb and is a wrecked mess that could do with a bit of tidying up. The remains of the court lie mostly in Donegal but most of the tomb, with an ante-chamber, a full chamber entranced through a classic pair of jambstones and a completely destroyed sub-chamber are in Tyrone. Indeed, the only online mention I can find for this calls it Garvagh, and places it in that townland in Tyrone. It's mentioned in the inventory section of Tomb Travel, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency SMR number TYR 015:005.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
14th October 2018ce
Edited 23rd October 2018ce

Knocksouna (Hillfort) — Folklore

I couldn't find out how old the earthworks on this hill are. But I'm hoping because it's a weird lump with folklore I might be allowed it until someone shows it's too modern and it is deleted mercilessly. Its name is 'Cnoc Samhna' (the Hill of Samhain, now aka Halloween) and connected with Mongfind, a queen from Irish mythology.
Cnoc-samhna (Knocksouna) is a hill on the south of Kilmallock. There is an opening in the side of the hill and a person could enter it. Often, at night-time a hunt in full cry has been heard round about the hill.

also:
There's no doubt about it, the fairies are there. My own daughter saw them in a field near Knocksouna - a host of them, little people wearing red coats. Of course they never appear to people in sin, and they never harm the innocent.
1930s folklore digitised at Dúchas.ie and here.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
14th October 2018ce

Carnroe (Chambered Tomb) — Folklore

A big giant long ago threw a large stone from Carn Roe outside Scotshouse to Shontamon Mountain in the County Cavan. The giant was about nine feet high and had two heads. He was afterwards buried under a big stone on Carnroe because Carn was the highest hill in the district. There is some mark on the stone which can still be seen.
From Jack Donohoe, Scotshouse.

There are many versions of this story in the neighbourhood. Some say the giant threw a stone from Sliabh Glah in Cavan to Carnroe, whilst others say it was from Cuilcagh Mountain he threw the stone. All are agreed that the giant was buried in the old "Giant's Grave" on Carnroe.

There is a "giants grave" on my father's farm in the townland of Carnroe. There are three stones, two standing upwards and one across. One of the stones is about four feet long and the others about three feet long. On one of the stones the letter "J" was cut, but it is not to be seen now. It is at the head of a field beside the road. - Edmund Burke.
From the 1930s collection of schools folklore, now being digitised at Dúchas.ie. The information via the Historic Environment Viewer map says: "Located on a W-facing slope of Carn Hill. Three stones, representing two sides of chamber are situated on the E side of a N-S field bank and drain at the edge of wood. Two other stones on the W side of the field bank c. 10m further S could also be part of it at the edge of a disused trackway to W of Cairn Hill wood. The remains are insufficient to allow a closer classification."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
13th October 2018ce

Corradooey (Court Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Corradooey</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Corradooey</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
7th October 2018ce
Showing 1-10 of 12,096 posts. Most recent first | Next 10