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Nesscliffe Hill Camp

Hillfort

<b>Nesscliffe Hill Camp</b>Posted by GLADMANImage © Robert Gladstone
Nearest Town:Shrewsbury (12km ESE)
OS Ref (GB):   SJ386198 / Sheet: 126
Latitude:52° 46' 18.79" N
Longitude:   2° 54' 36.79" W

Added by Rhiannon


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Fieldnotes

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28/03/2015 - After a visit to Old Oswestry, we were making good time so we played our hillfort bonus card and went for a quick nosey at Nesscliffe Hill Camp. I liked this one. Little bit of up, nice trees to walk through, good ramparts and a fine view. Worth a visit if you are passing. thelonious Posted by thelonious
3rd April 2015ce
Edited 3rd April 2015ce

This is a very pleasant spot to stroll round - there is an air of a park about it, as the hill was planted with all sorts of trees at one time. But you can make out the earthworks, admire the view over to the Breiddin Hills, and visit Kynaston's cave with its attendant bats and folklore (Humphrey Kynaston was a bit of a local hero, with his Black Bess- style horse, Beelzebub). If you go out to the northwest tip of the fort, known as Oliver's Point (after Oliver Cromwell? I don't know - he's blamed for a lot of things), there are some strange ballaun-style holes in the rock underfoot. Perhaps you know what they are? Cos I don't. Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
7th June 2006ce
Edited 17th February 2009ce

Folklore

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The Shropshire Walking website supports the idea that the naturally well protected corner of the fort, Oliver's Point, is named after Cromwell - and apparently the round holes are brought into the story too: they're said to be holes made by his soldiers to secure their cannons. Hmmm... you never know, but it sounds like a tall story to me.... Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th February 2009ce
Edited 17th February 2009ce