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Lewesdon Hill

Hillfort

<b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahomaImage © texlahoma
Nearest Town:Crewkerne (8km N)
OS Ref (GB):   ST437012 / Sheet: 193
Latitude:50° 48' 25.25" N
Longitude:   2° 47' 56.81" W

Added by phil


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Photographs:<b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma <b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by formicaant Maps / Plans / Diagrams:<b>Lewesdon Hill</b>Posted by texlahoma

Fieldnotes

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This is a truly magical place and (disputably) the highest place in Dorset, I believe it is as everything else in sight from here is below.

The approach I took was from Broadwinsor on the B3164 and then onto the B6132 and then take the bridle way at the old farmhouse across the filed and up towards Lewesdon Hill.

Before the steep climb begun I crossed what I'm told is an old drovers road or route, this place feels incredibly atmospheric from here right until you reach the top, with trees ranging from relatively young beech trees to ancient looking Oaks.

Oncve at the top there is a clear and quite flat plateau, surrounded almost completely with trees but still offering amazing views to Pilsdon Pen, Golden Cap and Lambert's Castle. Maybe with a pair of binoculars and on a clear day you could even see across to Glastonbury Tor, as my guide and fellow walker on this day has.
texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
10th March 2012ce

Folklore

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According to 'Dorsetshire Folklore' by John Symonds Udal (1922), this hill features in a couple of connected local sayings:

"As much akin as Leuson Hill to Pilsen-Pen" implies people who are near neighbours 'but neither relations nor aquaintance'.

"As far off as Lewedon Hill from Pillesdon Pen" denotes 'a distinct severance of friendly relations between near neighbours."

Lewesdon and Pilsdon Pen are indeed very close; and according to the info on Magic there are four hillforts overlooking this end of the Marshwood Vale "representing an unusual concentration."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
27th February 2006ce
Edited 18th March 2007ce

Miscellaneous

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There may have been some occupation , but would a hillfort be necessary here anyway with Pilsdon so close by? I wouldn't be surprised if the hill had been used in ancient times as the Golden cap is directly south on the coast. It is the disputed highest point Dorset , Pilsdon is often reckoned to be but Lewesdon is marked higher on o.s. maps , for what that's worth.
Glad to be proven wrong by the above, newer entries.
formicaant Posted by formicaant
4th April 2007ce
Edited 6th April 2012ce

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In 1788, a former vicar of the area, William Crowe, published a long poem about walking up the hill on a May morning. Naturally, it was entitled "Lewesdon Hill". It was widely praised at the time - even Wordsworth, who lived near the hill at one time, approved.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th March 2007ce
Edited 18th March 2007ce