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Coombe Hill

Causewayed Enclosure

<b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23Image © Jonnee23
Also known as:
  • Combe Hill

Nearest Town:Eastbourne (6km ESE)
OS Ref (GB):   TQ574022 / Sheet: 199
Latitude:50° 47' 50.49" N
Longitude:   0° 14' 1.5" E

Added by Cursuswalker


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<b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by juamei <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by A R Cane <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Jonnee23 <b>Coombe Hill</b>Posted by Cursuswalker

Fieldnotes

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Coombe Hill (or The Combe) certainly warrants a visit if you are in the South East Of England. I found it best to approach walking from the village of Jevington and following the South Downs Way, and if armed with an OS map (recommended!) you will notice there are plenty of other barrows marked on the way.

The top of the Hill has spectacular views and the three barrows are indeed impressive and extremely well looked after, so much so that the disc barrow is easy to define. If you walk south east then south from the enclosure you can be treated to further barrows, that are less impressive but worth a visit. I got to the large one at the top of Bourne Hill (TQ577009) before heading back to Jevington after an exhilarating and breathtaking walk on a fab summers' day in the East Sussex countryside.
Jonnee23 Posted by Jonnee23
4th October 2006ce
Edited 4th October 2006ce

A double circle Neolithic causewayed camp.

The inner circle can just about be traced all the way around, except where the circles have been interrupted by the downland scarp to the north. A right of way crosses the site, and the double entrances at both east and west can be made out best from this.

Also to east and west, right by the entrance in the case of the latter, are impressively sized Bronze Age round barrows (Impressive for this neck of the woods at least!)

This was the last causewayed camp built on the South Downs and it is roughly contemporary with Avebury Henge, where the Windmill Hill causewayed Camp was being abandoned in favour of the newer style of sacred enclosure, indicating how "backward" the Neolithic culture this far from the plateau of Wiltshire may have been.
Cursuswalker Posted by Cursuswalker
30th August 2003ce

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Combe Hill (Alternate spelling?)


A lot of good info on the site, including Curwen's 1929 map.
Cursuswalker Posted by Cursuswalker
15th January 2004ce