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South Wales


<b>South Wales</b>Posted by RhiannonImage © John Ward (1920)
Also known as:
  • Old Glamorgan

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Swansea & Neath Port Talbot

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<b>South Wales</b>Posted by Rhiannon


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Travelling upon the South Walian uplands can inspire... stimulate introspective analysis of what it really means to live in 21st Century Britain... or provide context for a pre-existing world view. Guess it is a personal journey which is nigh on impossible to relate to others with the necessary emphasis without sounding trite. Photography has been my chosen medium to make the attempt, for better or worse. However I wanted to share the Mam C's short verse, something which, in my opinion, transcends the perhaps not so 'all seeing' view of the optical lens:


For My Brother

The souls of the shoes
That have slipped here before
The cut of the water
Through hill side and more
The March of the winds
Up the blind alleys veil
The history that's shouting
"Do you understand now?"
Straight, solitary but never alone
The heaviest of platforms
That hide the blue bone
A continuum in the Crows
Defiant merry go round
Please understand this
It's our common ground.
1st November 2015ce
Edited 1st November 2015ce


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St Lythans Burial Chamber

Short film I made of the wonderful St Lythans .......
Easy to find.......detailed on most road atlases or follow juilans directions in TMA
David Milner Posted by David Milner
29th July 2012ce

Archaeoastronomy in South Wales

The archaeoastronomy of six stone rows, one avenue and two stone pairs are located within the South Wales region comprising Glamorgan, Gwent (Monmouthshire) and Brecknockshire (south Powys).
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
15th July 2005ce

Latest posts for South Wales

Showing 1-10 of 2,633 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Mynydd-y-glog (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Miscellaneous

Guess it's somewhat of a cliché to state that those with the loudest voices very often have the least to say. Nevertheless - in my opinion - it's true. Suffice to note I'm therefore not a fan of Noel Gallagher's little brother. Or, as it happens, rappers spouting platitudes which merely highlight perceived moral and intellectual shortcomings. Yeah, class will speak for itself. A bit like, from an archaeological perspective at least, the silence which pervades the sprawling mass of Mynydd-y-glog.

Situated in the transitional 'no man's land' between the seriously compromised industrial valleys and the beautiful, wild uplands of Fforest Fawr and, furthermore, rising to a perfunctory 1,277ft, Mynydd-y-glog must've sacked its tourist liaison officer years ago. Nothing to do. In fact one may well be tempted to ask why anyone would want to come here? It is a question well worth asking, however, particularly should one have an interest in the human story of what is now South Wales. For here, upon these unassuming slopes, sits a quite magnificent collection of Bronze Age upland cairns. According to RCAHMW [David Leighton, 2/9/2011]:

"...Eight round cairns lie in positions locally elevated to a greater or lesser degree. All have been disturbed... Around these lie a further eight round cairns, likewise disturbed.. A ‘simple’ ring cairn lies on a terrace on the north-west, and on the south... is a low circular mound, only faintly visible, with a gently dished interior suggesting perhaps a more elaborate ring is concealed here. Both are undisturbed... On the north side of the mountain are cairnfields and traces of settlements and field systems which extend across Pant Sychbant and Cwm Cadlan, areas which also contain sepulchral monuments. Cairnfields can also be found on the west side of the mountain..."

So, 18 monuments... with more potentially subsumed within the peat? Whatever, far too many to list individual characteristics here. Instead I'd recommend the curious Citizen Cairn'd contemplates a field visit. Take the Cwm Cadlan road exiting the A4059 at Penderyn and, shortly after a sharp right, follow a public footpath heading beyond the farm of Wernlas to ascend toward the summit of the hill, the latter crowned by an OS trig pillar. And quite a bit else.
18th February 2018ce

Coed-y-Caerau (Enclosure) — Fieldnotes

Visited 17.2.18

This month's YAC meeting involved trying to locate several 17th C boundery stones. The event was run by Mark Lewis (who works for the National Museum of Wales) who gave us a running commentry of all the things of interest during our walk. One of the first things he pointed out is the camp/enclosure at Pen-toppen-ash. This was easily seen from the lane which runs along its southern side. Mark said that although the site was built over by the Romans it is of an Iron Age, possibly Bronza Age origin. Mark added that limited excavation work had taken place at the site which showed that the stone walls are very well preserved beneath the turf. The turf covered ramparts of the Roman site were easy to make out.

COFLEIN states:
Site Description There are three co-joined earthwork enclosures at Coed-y-Caerau, Pen Toppen Ash. They are set along the summit crest of a steep ridge above the left bank of the lower Usk. The south-western enclosure is roughly oval, about 84-94m in diameter, defined by a single bank, with an apparent inturned entrance, having traces of an outer circuit on the south and south-west. The central enclosure is sub-circular, about 74-80m in diameter, defined by what appears to be a partially spiralling bank, within a roughly concentric outer embanked enclosure, that springs from the south-west enclosure circuit, about 136-142m in diameter, counterscarped on the north-west and having inturned entrances on the south-east and north-east.

The north-eastern enclosure is possibly a Roman fortlet, though an Iron Age date seems more likely given its association with the other Iron Age features. It is rectangular, about 96m north-east to south-west by 108m, and defined by a single bank with rounded angles. An outer, roughly concentric circuit, generally 166m square, appears to respect the central enclosure
Posted by CARL
18th February 2018ce

Cwm Bach and Whitmore Stairs (Cliff Fort) — Miscellaneous

Excellent little cliff fort - one of a linear chain gracing this Glamorgan coastline - overlooking Traeth Bach and most easily reached by a footpath from the minor road to the approx east. Note that it's possible to park a car near the junction with the Tre-pit Road (a little west of Wick).

Protected by the steep defile of Cwm Bach to the north and vertiginous cliffs to the west, artificial defences are only really required elsewhere.

According to Coflein:

"Two discrete lengths of bank, ditched on the SE, the northernmost c.40m NE-SW by 10m and 2.0m high, the other c.33.5m NE-SW by 8.5m and 1.5-2.6m high, truncated on the SW, together appear to define the SE side of a roughly triangular enclosure, resting on an eroding cliff-line on the SW and defined by scarps above the Cwm Bach on the N. Air photos suggest that the southern rampart segment continues N of entrance gap, behind line of the north rampart." J.Wiles 26.01.04
17th January 2018ce

Mynydd-y-Castell (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Mynydd-y-Castell</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th January 2018ce
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