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Hendraburnick Quoit

Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech

<b>Hendraburnick Quoit</b>Posted by pure joyImage © Martin Bull
Nearest Town:Hallworthy (5km E)
OS Ref (GB):   SX132882 / Sheets: 190, 200
Latitude:50° 39' 46.27" N
Longitude:   4° 38' 36.43" W

Added by phil

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Rock Art at Hendraburnick

Interesting article in the 'Post Hole' relating to recent (2013) excavations at Hendraburnick:

Extensive rock art has been found, along with several datable finds from the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age.
ocifant Posted by ocifant
14th October 2014ce

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<b>Hendraburnick Quoit</b>Posted by pure joy <b>Hendraburnick Quoit</b>Posted by pure joy <b>Hendraburnick Quoit</b>Posted by phil


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Hendraburnick 'quoit'.

Now here is something to think about! The Cornwall and Scilly Historic Environment Record show the OS grid reference as SX13210 88190. So that's one problem out of the way. The 'quoit' is in the Civil District of North Cornwall DC and the Ecclesiastical parish of Davidstow. It is listed as being either a
Prehistoric LONG BARROW or Post-Medieval SPOIL HEAP. Further, the records state 'Dewey suggested that a large slab, surrounded by a bank and internal ditch, were the remains of a cromlech or long barrow 60ft by 30ft (b1). However, this identification is doubted by Grinsell and Daniel, who consider it more likely to be a natural feature (b2,b3). The OS surveyors agree with this view, considering the cromlech to be a natural outcrop and the faint traces of a ditch the remains of a track (h2). "Dewey's views and plan seem exaggerated and inaccurate" (h2). However, Dewey's claim also rests upon the fact that the capstone of the 'cromlech' is of a non-local rock. This should be checked before entirely dismissing the feature as natural. The mound was visible on air photos and was interpreted as a spoil heap by the NMP'.
Finds - None.
Site History
1 1911 FV DEWEY
2 1976 FV OS
1 1911 DEWEY, H
VOL 18, 362-364 JRIC
1 0000 RAF 106G,UK,1498,4164-5
SMR No 7 OS No 27 Project ID Category Created 01/01/1997
Surve Morp Updated 26/04/2006

So! What do you lot reckon, after all these chaps are supposed to know?
Posted by bergman
2nd May 2006ce
Edited 2nd May 2006ce

As a member of the family which owns this site I would just like to warn everyone that the "space for parking" which Pure Joy mentions and the field itself is actually private property and anyone found there will be removed. Thank you Posted by Bugsy
14th April 2006ce

Hendraburnick Quoit - 2.4.2004

Wow, this is enormous! What a site this would have been before its collapse.

This is easily found in a field south of the road that connects the A39 near the Tich Barrow to Tintagel (signposted 'Tintagel' from the A39). I would say that the true grid ref is closer to SX132882.

It's actually in the field directly opposite the driveway to Treslay Farm (and there is space to park in this area just off the road), although this field seems to sometimes be temporarily separated, and has two entrances. The Quoit is just inside the field at the crest of the rising land.

I didn't actually check whose land it was on so just had a quite mooch [see note from Bugsy - Ed]. There was no livestock in the field (one gate was even open).
pure joy Posted by pure joy
4th April 2004ce
Edited 15th April 2006ce


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From the J.R.I.C.
Note on an unrecorded cromlech in North Cornwall
By Henry Dewey F.G.S. of H.M. Geological Survey

The Quoit/Cromlech lies about two and half miles s.e. of Boscastle and one and a half miles n.n.w. of Davidstow church. It is situated about half way between the farms of Treslay and Hendraburnick and stands in a field at the top of a hill which faces south. The top stone is large meusuring 16 feet by 8 feet and in places is 4 feet thick. A smaller stone not more than a quater this size supports at its western end, with some others nearly hidden by earth and shrubs beside it; while on the east the capstone rests on the ground, after the manner of the so called demi-dolmen at St. Breock Downs Beacon
Posted by phil
5th June 2003ce
Edited 5th June 2003ce