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King Orry's Grave

Chambered Cairn

<b>King Orry's Grave</b>Posted by KammerImage © Simon Marshall
Nearest Town:Douglas (10km SSW)
OS Ref (GB):   SC439844 / Sheet: 95
Latitude:54° 13' 52.36" N
Longitude:   4° 23' 42.53" W



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Fieldnotes

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Visited 24th August 2003: Is this one site or two? Nobody seems to know for sure. We parked up right next to the north eastern section of the site, and while Alfie dozed in the car we tried to figure out what went where. Like Cashtal yn Ard there's a forcourt, a clearly visible tomb entrance, and a long denuded cairn with chambers, but in this case the road cuts the end off.

On the other side of the road is the south western section of King Orry's Grave, and this may or may not be part of the same cairn. The solitary standing stone is thought to be the last of the stones that defined the arced wall of yet another forecourt (this suggests to me that the two sites aren't part of the same tomb).

Both parts of the site are difficult to interpret. Luckily there are big information boards on both sides of the road with reconstructive illustrations on them (slightly fanciful, but still useful). If you plan on visiting King Orry's Grave, I'd recommend getting hold of a plan beforehand. It will help.
Kammer Posted by Kammer
8th December 2003ce
Edited 8th December 2003ce

Folklore

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The Manx National Heritage information board next to the south western part of the site has this to say about King Orry:
King Orry is an almost legendary character revered by the Manx as their greatest king. He was King Godred Crovan, who seized the throne in 1079 and created the kingdom of Man and the Isles stretching from the Irish Sea to the Outer Hebrides. Several monuments are named in deference to him, but there is no connection between the historical figure and these prehistoric remains.
Kammer Posted by Kammer
8th December 2003ce

Links

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Isle of Man Guide: King Orry's Grave


A good sized page about this "the largest known megalithic tomb on the island", including photos and directions.
Kammer Posted by Kammer
12th August 2003ce
Edited 12th August 2003ce