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Condolden Barrow

Round Barrow(s)

<b>Condolden Barrow</b>Posted by Mr HamheadImage © Mr Hamhead
Nearest Town:Hallworthy (9km ENE)
OS Ref (GB):   SX090872 / Sheets: 190, 200
Latitude:50° 39' 9.02" N
Longitude:   4° 42' 8.29" W

Added by pure joy


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<b>Condolden Barrow</b>Posted by Mr Hamhead

Fieldnotes

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Sits in a field to the south of Boscastle / Tintagel. Easily reached by road with fantastic views out to sea or over to Bodmin Moor and beyond. Mr Hamhead Posted by Mr Hamhead
27th May 2007ce

Folklore

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Neil Fairbairn (in his Traveller's Guide to the Kingdoms of Arthur) says the site is also known as Cadon Barrow. It is the grave of Cador, an Earl of Cornwall and close friend of Arthur. Guinevere was supposed to have been living at his house/castle when Arthur met her.

In the Dream of Rhonabwy (in the Mabinogion) his name is spelt Cadwr, and he is named as the man responsible for arming Arthur as he goes into battle.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
6th July 2004ce
Edited 6th July 2004ce

This barrow is probably on the beacon hill that is attached by folklore to Warbstow Bury, via a story of two giants fighting (I love stories about giants!). pure joy Posted by pure joy
8th April 2003ce

Miscellaneous

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This is what Craig Weatherhill says about the barrow in “Cornovia: Ancient Sites of Cornwall & Scilly” (Cornwall Books - 1985, revised 1997 & 2000). “An excellent Bronze Age bowl barrow stands on a hilltop 300m above sea level. 26m across and 2.8m high, it is surrounded by traces of a wide ditch which has suffered from ploughing. An Ordnance Survey triangulation pillar stands on top of the barrow. The name ‘Condolden’ is derived from the Cornish ‘godolghyn’ (tump – a steep-sided mound); the alternative name, Cadon Barrow, is merely a contraction of Condolden.” pure joy Posted by pure joy
8th April 2003ce