The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

   

Yorkshire

Sites in this group:

8 posts
42 sites
East Riding of Yorkshire
14 posts
394 sites
North Yorkshire
36 sites
South Yorkshire
7 posts
15 sites
West Yorkshire
3 sites
York

News

Add news Add news

Ancient Quernhow monument commemorated


Lost but not forgotten....


A BRONZE Age monument has been commemorated after a long-running campaign.

The 4,000-year-old Quernhow burial mound, which was obliterated by the upgrading of the A1(M), has been marked with a plaque and stone by the Quernhow Café, near Ainderby Quernhow, by the Highways Agency... continues...
moss Posted by moss
22nd November 2012ce

New Walking Trail of Ilkley Moor's Rock Art

The Friends of Ilkley Moor have launched a Cup and Ring Stone GPS (global positioning system) trail so that owners of GPS systems, including the latest mobile phones, can find them.

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/at-a-glance/main-section/uncovered-secrets-of-ilkley-moor-s-rock-art-1-4925780
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2012ce
Edited 22nd September 2012ce

'Don't desecrate the chieftain's grave'


Article in the 'Craven Herald & Pioneer'- March 23 2009

Modern cairns built by Dales hikers will be dismantled this weekend under plans to preserve a Bronze Age chieftain's burial site... continues...
caealun Posted by caealun
23rd March 2009ce
Edited 24th March 2009ce

Barrows, Bones and Bunkers!


Tees Archaeology Dayschool 2006

The Conference Centre, Ebsworth Building, University of Durham, Stockton Campus

Saturday 4th November 2006
10.15am - 4.15pm

Topics will include
Rock Art in Cleveland and North East Yorkshire:context and chronology... continues...
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
19th September 2006ce
Edited 19th September 2006ce

Gristhorpe Man 'was Bronze Age warrior chieftain'


From The Telegraph's website
Gristhorpe Man, who was found buried in a tree trunk in the 19th century, has been identified as a Bronze Age warrior chieftain by archaeologists.

The skeleton of Gristhorpe Man, excavated near Scarborough in 1834... continues...
Hob Posted by Hob
7th September 2006ce
Edited 7th September 2006ce

The historic environment of the Yorkshire Dales


22.4.06
A day school organised by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority in association with the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 10am–4:30pm at Grassington Town Hall, Grassington. The Yorkshire Dales have some of the best preserved and extensive historic landscapes in the country... continues...
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
6th February 2006ce
Edited 8th February 2006ce

Ancient artists who made their mark on our landscape


From Yorkshire Post today
9th January 2006

Stone Age rock carvings in Yorkshire have provided a fascinating glimpse into life 4,000 years ago

Whether their intricate designs are maps, religious symbols or simply an early form of graffiti, Stone Age rock carvings are seen as invaluable to unlocking secrets of c... continues...
Jane Posted by Jane
9th January 2006ce
Edited 10th January 2006ce

Neolithic Skull found on beach

http://icteesside.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0001head/tm_objectid=16505783%26method=full%26siteid=50080-name_page.html#story_continue
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
30th December 2005ce

Ancient man's lost secrets on test


Technology from the 21st century will be used to unlock the past to one of Yorkshire's most important archaeological finds from the Bronze Age... continues...
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
14th December 2005ce
Edited 14th December 2005ce

A 6,000-year Dales story of ritual and cannibalism...


From the Yorkshire post:

"They roamed the earth almost 6,000 years ago, performing rituals on animal remains and devouring human body parts.
But these are not the strange creatures of film or fiction – they were farmers in the Yorkshire Dales... continues...
Hob Posted by Hob
11th October 2005ce

First road map to put the region's historic assets on track


English Heritage 205/06/05
8th June 2005

A blueprint to revitalise the historic environment in Yorkshire and
the Humber, putting it at the centre of regeneration, is unveiled
today (Thursday 9 June)... continues...
Posted by BrigantesNation
9th June 2005ce
Edited 9th June 2005ce

Iron Age house replica for Ryedale Folk Museum


A replica of an Iron Age house used by the first settlers in Ryedale is set to be built by young offenders in the grounds of Ryedale Folk Museum at Hutton-le-Hole.

The venture, which is expected to cost £25,000, will see the 10-metre long house become a major new attraction at the popular museum, says curator Mike Benson... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th May 2005ce

Ancient Chariot Excites Experts


From an article published on the BBC News web site on 9th February 2005:
A chariot burial site uncovered in West Yorkshire could be the final resting place of one of Britain's ancient tribal leaders, archaeologists say... continues...
Kammer Posted by Kammer
11th March 2005ce
Edited 11th March 2005ce

Country 'waking up' to Thornborough henges threat


CAMPAIGNERS fighting to safeguard the Thornborough Henges say the country is "waking up" to the threat facing the nationally important site near Ripon... continues...
Posted by BrigantesNation
4th September 2004ce
Edited 11th March 2005ce

Upcoming Exhibition on Modern Views of Rock Art


NOT SET IN STONE

An exhibition to explore perceptions of prehistoric rock art, time and landscapes in Britain.

Ilkley Manor House Museum
25th September to 21st November

This exhibition aims to explore what prehistoric rock art, its time-depth and its landscapes mean to us today... continues...
Kozmik_Ken Posted by Kozmik_Ken
27th May 2004ce

Why did Iron Age Man go off Fish?


Fragments of femur excavated from an Iron Age burial site in east Yorkshire (England) have been analyzed by the department of archaeological sciences at Bradford University. For scientists, bones such as these contain a key piece of information about ancient societies: what people ate... continues...
Kozmik_Ken Posted by Kozmik_Ken
19th January 2004ce
Edited 19th January 2004ce

Walker Finds Neolithic Axe in Yorkshire


An eagle-eyed walker's stroll in English countryside has turned up a piece of history going back at least 3000 years. Michael Lowsley was on one of his regular walks through the picturesque Crimple Valley when an object sticking from the soil suddenly stopped him in his tracks. "I thought straight away it looked interesting... continues...
Kozmik_Ken Posted by Kozmik_Ken
12th January 2004ce
Edited 12th January 2004ce

Celtic Coins on Display in Yorkshire


The tiny gold Celtic coins are the latest in a series of finds that are becoming more common since metal detectorists and archeologists started working together.

And they were used by the same tribe whose chariot burials have fascinated the public in recent months... continues...
Jane Posted by Jane
20th December 2003ce
Edited 22nd December 2003ce

(Another) Archaeological Site At Risk

One of Britain's most important archaeological finds is under threat - from North Yorkshire potato farmers.

Scientists have discovered a vast area of buried buildings and villages spanning 6,000 years, under fields at West Heslerton, near Malton in North Yorkshire.

Read whole story here...
Jane Posted by Jane
16th November 2003ce
Edited 17th November 2003ce

Second 'sacrifice' found at Kettlewell

further to fitzcoraldo's news at
http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/news.php?post=10089

another child burial has been found at the site. Pebbles had been placed at their head and feet.

http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticleMore2.aspx?
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
13th June 2003ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
'In ley and ham and hill and ton,
Many Old English placenames run,
But beck and kirk and by of course,
Arrive in Yorkshire from Old Norse'.
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
11th August 2004ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

The Valley of the First Iron Masters


Website about the valley of the River Foulness in East Yorkshire since the Old Stone Age - but mostly about Iron Age times, when it was home to one of Britain's oldest and largest prehistoric iron industries. You can choose the depth of information you want (basic/intermediate/research) on the front page.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
25th August 2005ce

The Standing Stones of the North York Moors


A pretty comprehensive list of many of the better known NYM stones including boundary stones & crosses.
Hopefully the author will develop this site to include a lot more pictures & information
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th March 2004ce

Yorkshire Rock Art


Graeme C presents a wealth of information and photos of rock carvings in Yorkshire and elsewhere.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th July 2002ce
Edited 12th January 2003ce

Holistic Fraternity


Dedicated to saving a Neolithic double-ditch henge in South Yorkshire. Lots of photos & link to Stone Circle webring.
Posted by Kathy_Holliday
6th August 2000ce
Edited 12th January 2003ce

Latest posts for Yorkshire

Showing 1-10 of 4,135 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Cursuses relating to the Rudston Monolith


The Rudston cursus group consists of four cursuses stretching along the bottom and sides of the Great Wold Valley. At least one end of each of the monument are to be found on the elevated chalk ridges which surround Rudston. The valley contains the Gypsey Race, one of the rare streams across the chalklands, and two of the cursuses (A and C) cross this stream. The Rudston group contains an unparalleled concentration of cursus monuments. Cursus A is the southern most of the group. The southern end of the cursus survives as an earthwork and the remainder is visible on air photographs as two parallel ditches. The cursus is 2700 metres long by circa 58 metres, it tapers to 41 metres at the south terminal. Cursus A is the only one of the group where both ends are visible, both of the terminals are square in plan. The earthwork was excavated in the mid 19th century by Greenwell and showed what appeared to be a round barrow raised upon the surface of a long mound. This excavation produced six burials (two with Beakers), only one of which Greenwell considered to be primary, and a considerable amount of pottery. These burials were inserted into the south end of the cursus monument in the early bronze age. Greenwell also found sherds of earlier Neolithic pottery, along with worked flint and animal bones on the ground surface beneath the bank of the cursus. A second excavation across the west ditch in 1958 recovered 24 small pieces of Beaker pottery from the bottom 18 inches of the ditch fill, excluding the primary fill, and 4 larger pieces from the primary fill. There is evidence to suggest that the ditch was recut at this point explaining the presence of the later pottery.
moss Posted by moss
30th September 2017ce

Beacon Cursus — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Beacon Cursus</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

25/09/2017 – We had popped down to Scarborough for a long weekend just for a bit of walking really. A few days before we came I noticed that we weren’t too far from Rudston so we crammed 3 days of walking into 2, leaving our last day free for a visit to this mega monolith.

Easy enough to get to by car but we were on the bus, which still wasn’t too tricky. Morning 121 bus from Scarborough to Burton Agnes and then a 3 mile or so walk down quietish country roads to Rudston.

We arrived at the south side of the church and had a little debate as to which way round the church we wanted to go for our first sight of the stone. These things are important I think, it’s not every day you get to see the tallest standing stone in Britain for the first time. We chose clockwise.

Rounding the corner of the building and there it stood in all its glory. It really is impressive and as wonderful as I hoped it would be. It seemed to grow and grow as we edged closer. It was hard not to just keep staring at it. So solid and timeless. I know the church and graveyard setting isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but I quite liked it and loved the difference in height between the monolith and the similar shaped gravestones round it.

After having a look at the small stone and cist in the corner (it looked a little sad hidden away and dark with the overhead leaves at this time of year) we sat across the road on a bench and had our butties.

The inside of the church is worth a look and has a small display about the history of the area.

After one last look at the stone we started the slow walk back to the bus stop. We kept an eye out for any sign of the cursus that crosses the road to the south of Rudston but no luck. Did manage to find a coffee shop in Burton Agnes which helped with the wait for the bus.

Top day out and the Rudston monolith is a must see site.

Happy us on the bus back to Scarborough for an evening of chips and gravy and two penny falls.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce
Edited 2nd October 2017ce

Seamer Beacon (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Seamer Beacon</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Seamer Beacon (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

24/09/2017 – I liked this one. Not really much to see but the walk up from Scarborough is nice and the top very green with a good clump of trees hiding the beacon. Worth going for a little leg stretch. Nice views and the access is fine.

If you are in the area it’s worth popping by the Rotunda Museum near the sea front. Nice display of objects from Star Carr and Bronze age Gristhorpe Man with his fantastic tree trunk burial.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

High Woof Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>High Woof Howe</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce

Louven Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Louven Howe</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce

Louven Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

23/09/2017 - X93 bus out from Scarborough to the Falcon Inn on the A171 to start a nice loop of three hills - Brow Moor, Stony Leas & Barns Cliff End. Long day and it was dark by the time we caught the bus back.

Good track to start through the trees and then out to the moor to make the small climb to the trig on Brow Moor. Even though it was still early in the day I knew already we just didn't have the time to look round this area for cup marked rocks which was a bit sad. We pushed on and headed west.

The walk between Brow Moor trigpoint and Louven Howe on the top of Stony Leas was easy going but felt long. The crossing of Jugger Howe Beck was nice and Burn Howe was worth a look. It did feel good to finally make it to Louven Howe for a sit and a brew.

There's plenty of round barrows around here and from the ones we saw, they all looked pretty much of a muchness. If you want to visit one or two, this and Lilla Howe make for a nice walk from a few directions. I don't think this would be the best place to visit in rubbish weather though.

Louven Howe has a large hole in it, I couldn't make my mind up about it. Bit odd.

After a stop to rest and take in the views, which are good, we headed south to enter the trees and make the long walk back to the A171 via Barns Cliff End.

Nice day out but couldn't quite fit in everything we wanted to see.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce

Burn Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Burn Howe</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 4,135 posts. Most recent first | Next 10