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Gardom's Edge

Sites in this group:

30 posts
Gardom's Edge Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
8 posts
Gardom's Edge II Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
22 posts
Gardom's Enclosure Enclosure
12 posts
Gardom's Ring Cairn Ring Cairn
28 posts
Gardoms Standing Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
15 posts
The Three Men of Gardoms Cairn(s)

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<b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by stubob <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by stubob <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by postman <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by postman <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by postman <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by postman <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by postman <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by stubob <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by stubob <b>Gardom's Edge</b>Posted by stubob

Fieldnotes

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Starting from the Robin Hood carpark and pub, the well trodden footpath goes up the hill, first passing a small but identifiable ring cairn, winter being the best time to see it as it's still got its summer coat of bracken on, making it hard to find and harder to distinguish.
Then passing what I presume to be about half a dozen small cairns possibly of the clearence variety, we come to a long outcrop of rock, huge boulders stacked atop each other, nothing like Sacsayhuaman in Peru, but it still makes me think of that faraway wonder.
Passing between two standing stones guiding us to the edge, next up is the three men cairn, an odd thing without a doubt, but the mound beneath the three peaks is undoubtedly a barrow of some sort.
Then the path strolls meanderingly about the giant rocks that litter the Edge that is Gardom's, sometimes a vertigo inducing drop is just a few feet from the path, it is truly spectacular, well maybe not, that kind of statement should be reserved for places like Patagonia or the Himalayas. But it is beautiful, the colours, the clear air, darting little brown lizards, it all conjours up words close to spectacular.
Then we leave the edge and go through the hole in the wall.
This is the abode of Megs walls,pit alignments, the standing stone and two pieces of rock art one of which is covered by a replica, the other stubbornly refuses to let me find it.
From the replica, cairns can be got to between the two edges, Gardom's and Birchen edge with its little monument to Nelson on top, then its back down to the pub carpark.
postman Posted by postman
23rd September 2011ce
Edited 23rd September 2011ce

There's a handy map of what's where on Gardoms Edge on the website.(see links)
Free parking in public car park next to Robin Hood public house.

Gardom's Edge is named after Thomas Gardom a mill owner from Calver.
stubob Posted by stubob
3rd July 2002ce
Edited 7th May 2003ce

Links

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Moors for the Future


An audio trail to download to your mp3 player taking in some of the archaeology of Gardom's Edge.
A map and directions for the walk are available too.
stubob Posted by stubob
10th January 2008ce
Edited 13th January 2008ce

British Archaeology


Article on Gardom's Edge as Neolithic trading centre.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th August 2003ce

Gardoms Edge Website


Neolithic enclosure, Rock Art and much more
stubob Posted by stubob
18th April 2002ce
Edited 2nd September 2008ce

Latest posts for Gardom's Edge

Showing 1-10 of 119 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Gardom's Ring Cairn — Fieldnotes

The path makes its descent, cutting through a cairnfield of pretty large, irregularly shaped cairns. The Gardom’s Edge ring cairn is completely hidden by bracken, but can be spotted by the forked silver birch that grows from its embanked edge. Once found, the course can be followed round easily enough, but really this is a place for a winter visit if you want to see it properly. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

The Three Men of Gardoms (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

We follow the arc of Meg’s Walls south, before leaving the wood to emerge at the Three Men cairn. The three stone piles are clearly modern, but they sit on a much larger footprint. The views from here are great, looking down on Baslow as the sun sinks further. It’s starting to get colder and it won’t be long now until dark, so we press on without lingering. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Gardom's Edge (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Fieldnotes

Next up, we encounter the stonework of Meg’s Walls. Half-buried in the undergrowth, too large to take in easily, this is a fascinating survivor enhanced by a lovely woodland setting. But we’re really here for rock art. After a bit of rooting about in the undergrowth, we find it on the edge of the woods, looking towards the steep western face of Birchen Edge. The light is now too low to illuminate the panel, but casts a soft orange glow across the moor ahead of us.

Despite knowing that it’s a replica, the panel itself is still very impressive. I love the variety of patterns, whatever it represents – or doesn’t. Water has collected in the deepest cup, reflecting the slender trees and blue sky above, an ever open, all-seeing eye on the world.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Gardoms Standing Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

The main reason for coming here is the rock art panel, so memorably filled with pink flowers by Postman a few years ago. But first, I’m hoping to find the standing stone, something of a rarity in this area. We walk through the woods, trying to stay away from the treeless edge, as I know the stone won’t be found there. It turns out to be further south than I’d realised, another site that the Ordnance Survey map doesn’t show. Eventually it makes itself known, as we get towards the higher part of the wood. The light has gone strange now, the low sun filtered around the edges of a bank of cloud giving an ethereal glow to the woods and the stone.

The stone is a good one, a little taller than I imagined and different from each angle and direction. Like many of the best standing stones, it gives off a feeling of sentience. Even though I know this is just projection on my part, it’s hard to shake once felt. There’s no malignance, or beneficence, just a presence. I often find woodland sites hard to leave, and the stone definitely exerts a pull. As we leave I’m compelled to look back, Orpheus to Eurydice.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Gardom's Ring Cairn — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Gardom's Ring Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Gardom's Ring Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Gardom's Ring Cairn</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th November 2016ce

The Three Men of Gardoms (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>The Three Men of Gardoms</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>The Three Men of Gardoms</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>The Three Men of Gardoms</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th November 2016ce
Showing 1-10 of 119 posts. Most recent first | Next 10