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Baile Mhargaite

Broch

<b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamiltonImage © Les Hamilton
Nearest Town:Thurso (43km ENE)
OS Ref (GB):   NC69736097 / Sheet: 10
Latitude:58° 31' 3.09" N
Longitude:   4° 14' 12.19" W

Added by Rhiannon


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<b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>Baile Mhargaite</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Fieldnotes

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Visited: June 5, 2017

Across the estuary of the River Naver from Bettyhill stands a steep 80 metre tall hill bearing the broch Baile Mhargaite on its summit.

It's a walk of around 1.5 kilometres from the bridge over the River Naver at Invernaver, across grass then sand to the broch, following a rough path to the south of Baile Mhargaite up a steep stream. It is best to continue a little past the broch as the easiest ascent is from the west.

From the outside, this broch is little more than a tumbled mass of stones, but the interior wall is well preserved all the way round the structure, to a visible height approaching two metres. In reality, the true height of these walls is probably as great as five metres as the interior of the broch is deeply infilled by blown sand (hence this sometimes being dubbed the 'Sandy Broch'.

You can read more about this site at Canmore, who also provide an aerial colour photograph of the area.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
6th June 2017ce
Edited 26th November 2017ce

Folklore

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[There is a tradition] regarding the Sandy dun at Bettyhill, where an old woman hid a croc of cold previous to the dun being attacked, and measured the distance from it with a clew of thread.
A disappointingly brief mention in 'Notes of Cromlechs, Duns, Hut-Circles, Chambered Cairns and other remains, in the County of Sutherland' by James Horsburgh, in PSAS v7 (1866-8).

Information about the broch can be found here.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
28th October 2009ce
Edited 28th October 2009ce