The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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News

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Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas


For the first time, a detailed online atlas has drawn together the locations and particulars of the continues...
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
22nd June 2017ce
Edited 5th July 2017ce

The 25th Festival of Archaeology will take place between the 11th - 26th July 2015


The Festival is a huge celebration of our incredible history here in the UK, and you don't have to be an archaeologist to join in. It's a chance for everyone to explore and uncover the past, see archaeology in action, and bring the history on your doorstep to life. We look forward to seeing you there... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
8th July 2015ce

Free open Days - 11 to 14 Sep - UK Wide


Find out what's open in your local area - Every where listed is free for the day!

http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/advanced-search

For more information about the European Heritage Days, visit www.ehd... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
10th September 2014ce
Edited 10th September 2014ce

Help wanted to create 3D modeling of megalithic sites


http://heritagetogether.org/?lang=en

"HeritageTogether is an AHRC-funded project run by Bangor, Aberystwyth and Manchester Metropolitan Universities in conjunction with Gwynedd Archaeological Trust... continues...
juamei Posted by juamei
20th February 2014ce
Edited 20th February 2014ce

British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online


British Rock Art Collection (BRAC) - back Online

http://ukra.jalbum.net/brac

Quite a few people will hopefully remember BRAC - the online image gallery covering British rock art sites... continues...
Posted by Chappers
2nd December 2013ce

CBA issue "Archaeology is about knowledge, not treasure" article


Following on the from ITV's "Britain's Secret Treasures" programme, the Council for British Archaeology have issued an excellent, unequivocal statement on their website... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th July 2012ce

What caused Britain's Bronze Age 'recession'?


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12989605

A large gap in pre-history could signal that Britain underwent an economic downturn over 2,500 years ago... continues...
Chris Collyer Posted by Chris Collyer
7th April 2011ce

British ancient forests were patchy


From PlanetEarth online

What were Britain's primordial forests like before humans started tampering with the environment? The latest clues from a study of fossil beetles suggest that the ancient forest was patchy and varied in density across Britain... continues...
baza Posted by baza
30th November 2009ce
Edited 30th November 2009ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
Local Myths and Legends: UK Section

http://www.localmythsandlegends.com/united-kingdom/

This is a unique resource for all things odd, mystical, unexplained and peculiar. From local tales of giants to driver-terrorizing phantom hands, the website allows users to add their own local legends with the interactive maps.
Chance Posted by Chance
4th March 2011ce
Edited 2nd September 2012ce

Links

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Of barrows, burials and blades of bronze


A fascinating article on barrows and their history.
moss Posted by moss
28th August 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


How To: Report Dumped Rubbish or Damage to a Heritage Site

An article I wrote which details how to report damage or litter at prehistoric sites that you may find as you work your way through the sites on TMA. In short:

1. Take lots of photos.
2. Take 5 minutes to briefly write down the following:
- date
- site name
- site location (an OS ref will do)
- type of crime
- extent of crime
3. Ring the police on 999 if its happening right now and on 101 if its already happened. You do not have to give your name.
juamei Posted by juamei
8th June 2012ce
Edited 8th June 2012ce

The Heritage Journal


Spot the stone circle competition!

Can you recognise any of these stone circles from the aerial photos?
A friend just emailed me this link so thought I'd share it on here if anyone wants to have a go. Good luck!
Emma A Posted by Emma A
24th May 2012ce
Edited 24th May 2012ce

Old newspapers go on-line


All over the press today, the official launch of the British Library Newspaper website. May be of use to TMAers... a search for Stonehenge found 450 articles to read.
Mr Hamhead Posted by Mr Hamhead
30th November 2011ce
Edited 30th November 2011ce

The coins of the ancient Britons


Victorian guidebook to coins of various ancient British tribes By Sir John Evans from 1864 - A nighthawkers delight

Download the complete book in PDF via Google books
Chance Posted by Chance
25th July 2010ce

Mythology and rites of the British Druids


Mythology and rites of the British Druids as certained by national documents and compared with the general traditions and customs of heathenism, as illustrated by antiquaries of our age. With an appendix, containing ancient poems and extracts, with some remarks on ancient British coins.

by Davies, Edward
Published in 1809, Printed for J Booth (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Ancient man in Britain


Ancient man in Britain.
by Donald Alexander Mackenzie
Published in 1922, Blackie (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Life in early Britain


Life in early Britain
being an account of the early inhabitants of this island and the memorials which they have left behind them

by Windle, Bertram Coghill Alan Sir.
Published in 1897, David Nutt (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom


An archaeological survey of the United Kingdom.
by Murray, David
Published in 1896, MacLehose (Glasgow)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The antiquities of England and Wales


The antiquities of England and Wales.
by Grose, Francis
Published in 1785, S. Hooper (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.


The ancient stone implements, weapons and ornaments, of Great Britain.
by Evans, John Sir
Published in 1897, Longmans, Green, and Co. (London, Bombay)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Standing Stones & Monoliths - stories from the Paranormal Database


150 Recorded Paranormal events from the UK's Standing Stones & Monoliths
Chance Posted by Chance
25th October 2009ce

Latest posts for United Kingdom

Showing 1-10 of 108,253 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Graig-ddu, Black Mountains (Round Cairn) — Miscellaneous

CPAT description with excavation details:
An excavated round barrow cist which is circular in form with quite steeply sloping sides and a depressed interior. The mound's perimeter is well defined although no kerbstones or ditch was visible. The sides of the mound are under turf, whilst the levelled interior exposes stone. A large sandstone slab, aligned E-W, dominates the central S area of the cairn's interior. This is presumably the remains of the cist excavated by Jones (1981); the upper most edge of this slab is all that is now exposed.

Dimensions: diameter 15.2m; height 1.2m-1.4m
(1981) A cairn 15.5m diameter, c.1.5m high with a large cist at the centre was examined. Small particles of bone and a few potshereds were found in soil in the cist, and further sherds, the rim of a large vessel with incised decoration and a barbed and tanged arrowhead were found on the cairn floor. There was no evidence of a kerb.

(1981) EXCAVATION: The removal of the part-fill of loose boulders together with C20th rubbish revealed an irregular layer of dark brown soil slopping down towards the E end. Progressive trowelling revealed no stratification, the soil being of a disturbed nature and containing burned bracken and some broken glass similar to that associated with the boulder deposits. However, there was a firmer area of soil in the angle between the easternmost orthostat and the boulder clay on which the cist had been constructed. In this undisturbed material the first and largest pottery sherd, a piece of the rim of a large, decorated, vessel was discovered. Scattered in a random manner and near the first find were other small fragments of pottery together with several fragments of bone. A tanged and barbed arrow head and other small flint flakes and artifacts also appeared in a scatter across this area.

The Cist had been constructed from sandstone slabs. The S orthostat measured 1.86m in length, 1.2m deep and was 0.075m in thickness, being set into the ground so that its upper edge was almost exactly horizontal. The N slab was 1.56m, 0.87m deep and 0.075m thick. Both these main orthostats were orientated generally E-W. Slots had been cut into the original boulder clay surface and the orthostats were held upright with small stones and earth packing. The smaller E and W slabs were not so deep set and were given additional support by small stones placed within the cist. The N orthostat had cracked under lateral pressure while that at the W end was incomplete and badly damaged. A matching portion of this slab was found lying within the cist.

All the indications were of a robbed burial, impression futher strengthened by finds made outside the cist itself and at its E end. At this point an area of the cairn boulders were cleared so that any pattern of construction could be investigated. Although the cairn proved to have been made of randomly placed boulders at this point, on the original ground surface and in close proximity to one another, were five small sherds of pottery. The loose nature of the cairn boulders would have allowed such small fragments of pottery to have percolated downwards had they been placed on the edge of the cist by the original robbers.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th August 2018ce

South Down Sleight (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

A scatterred group of barrows, including a group of three north of the military road from Warminster to Imber. The single one is actually on Summer down but this site name is already in use for a different place in Wiltshire so to avoid confusion I have added it here.
The group of 3 are listed as National Monument 10091 and the single as 10089. These were taken from a bus on one of the few days this area is open to the public.
formicaant Posted by formicaant
18th August 2018ce

South Down Sleight (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>South Down Sleight</b>Posted by formicaant<b>South Down Sleight</b>Posted by formicaant formicaant Posted by formicaant
18th August 2018ce

Oxendean Down (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>Oxendean Down</b>Posted by formicaant formicaant Posted by formicaant
18th August 2018ce

Dun Kearstach (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

It is said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder... an oft-quoted axiom implying, I guess, that just about everything can be 'beautiful' to someone, somewhere, at some time or another. Depends upon your point of view... whether the sleek form of a fast car floats your boat (incidentally I'm with Pete Shelley here), that packed beach upon the Costa del Sol, or even the tribalistic shenanighans inherent in watching people kicking/carrying/whacking a ball around a field. To be honest I find the ideal of beauty much harder to pin down, to define. A nebulous, intangible concept seemingly spontaneously occurring during perceived moments of heightened awareness, of emotional fulfilment when the senses appear to align, attaining optimal equilibrium.

A case in point, perhaps, is to witness dawn beside the chambered cairn at An Sithean, the monument presenting a breath-taking aesthetic vision harmonising with the elegantly sweeping profile of Beinn na Caillich towering above and beyond, the cloudless sky emphatically refuting Skye's 'Misty Isle' epithet. Yeah, a treasure so rare that even devils might care, to quote Mr Ferry from '73. The moment can't last, of course, a passing bus highlighting the dilemma intrinsic to current public transport solutions by emitting a cloud of noxious fumes, choking both myself and the neighbourhood sheep. But as long as the passengers believe they are saving the planet, eh?

Nevertheless the landscape is overwhelming in its grandeur as I approach Loch Slapin, the jagged skyline of Bla Bheinn rising majestically across the water perhaps every child's vision of what a mountain should look like. Well, it certainly appeals to the child within. A little before Torrin a very rough single track road exits left to access the foreshore at Camas Malag, the environs popular with 'overnighters' possessing a, shall we say, more communal ethic than I?

From the bay a track heads southward, hugging the coast toward the abandoned hamlet of Suisnish, presumably still standing mute testimony to the appalling enforced clearances of yore. It is a fine walk, worthwhile in its own right and, perhaps not surprisingly, reminiscent of another, some way to the west, accessing Rubh an Dunain. The route is enlivened by several streams cascading into Loch Slapin upon abruptly running out of hillside, although it is the vistas across the loch which naturally hold the beguiled traveller's attention. Eventually the track swings to the left approaching light woodland and the bridge across the Allt Poll a'Bhainne; here, after refilling the water bottle, Dun Kearstach can be discerned upon a prominent moorland rise to the east, within Glen Boreraig. As Les notes, there is no path.....

For me, the dun is a magical place. I'm reminded of the lower settlement upon Foel Offrwm in far off Gwynedd, but, to be honest, Dun Kearstach is a pretty unique site, the coastal scenery, gazing across to Sgurr Alasdair, sentinel peak of the legendary Black Cuillin, of the highest calibre. The location is highly defensible, the flanks of the little knoll falling sharply to the floor of the glen and thus accentuating the limited strength of the single drystone wall enclosing the summit. OK, not an awful lot of masonry courses remain but, with clear evidence of an entrance to the west, it is more than enough. And let's face it, what with the Allt a' Ghairuillt flowing immediately below to the north fresh water wasn't exactly going to be a problem, was it?

As I lie back and take it all in it becomes increasingly apparent that here, recumbent upon this little grassy plateau overlooking Loch Slapin in the sunshine, I have (albeit with Les's help) chanced upon another obscure moment of sheer natural beauty upon this enigmatic island. I am reluctant to leave and break the spell, only eventually doing so in order to visit the two further duns guarding the northern aspect of the loch. As it transpires this is easier said than done - both the leaving and the subsequent visits, particularly that to the larger of the two, Dun Mor - but there you are.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
18th August 2018ce
Edited 19th August 2018ce

Kinderlow (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

... A later generation than the old wife has been known to pour out a libation of good red port to "whatever gods may be," during the exhilaration which followed reaching the highest point of our county - the cairn on Kinderlow. There was folk lore in this too. The climbers were of a hard, sceptical kind, believing in nothing, not even in themselves, yet they wasted good wine on this ritual. There on the top, against the sky, the present day world had dropped away and there was a feeling of being surrounded by they know not what elemental forces moulding the timeworn world.
Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, 30th April 1920.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th August 2018ce

Boar's Den (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Ascending Parbold Hill and proceeding eastward in the direction of Standish, says [Mr Price, honourary secretary of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire], a slight decent is made into the ravine called Sprodley Wood, locally known as Fairy Glen, and along this wood runs Sprodley Brook. Shortly after passing over Sprodley Brook, in a field on the left may be seen a grass-covered mound, which from time immemorial seems to have been called Boars Den.

[...] From this plateau a magnificent view presents itself at every point of the compass. Northwards, beyond the silver streak of the Ribble estuary, rise the Cumberland Hills; nearer, and trending eastwards, may be seen Pendle Hill, Bleasdale Moors, Longridge Fells, Rivington Pike, and Anglesark Moors; southwards, Standish, Billinge Beacon, and Ashurst; and westward stretches a vast plain, with the Welsh mountains faintly outlined across the Mersey estuary. Few sites in Lancashire could rival this in its command of the ancient landmarks and beacons of the county, and the estuaries of the Ribble, Mersey, and Dee.
In the Wigan Observer, 25th May 1904.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th August 2018ce

Pendeen Vau (Fogou) — Folklore

The house in which Dr. Borlase, the famous antiquary, was born, was the next place of interest to be visited [Pendeen Manor House], and here Mr. Millett read a paper dealing with the history of the old mansion and its most interesting features. He reminded his hearers that there was a tradition to the effect that John Wesley had once preached in that very farmyard, bu the founder of Methodism makes no allusion to the fact in his diary, and it rests on very slender evidence.

A hundred yards or so from the house is Pendeen Vau, an artificial cave of considerable extent, which according to local legends, stretches many miles under the sea. Some have even said that you can, if you only know the way, and have sufficient courage, enter the cave at Pendeen and emerge from it at Scilly!

The explorations of our antiquaries did not extend so far, but they traversed the cave from one end to the other, without finding one particle of the "fairy gold" which is said to exist in its walls, or seeing any of the "little people" who are reported to haunt it.
In the Cornish Telegraph, 9th August 1888.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th August 2018ce

Higher Boden Fogou — Images

<b>Higher Boden Fogou</b>Posted by Andy Norfolk Posted by Andy Norfolk
15th August 2018ce
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