The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

 

Ceredigion

County

<b>Ceredigion</b>Posted by KammerCarreg Llwyd (East) © Simon Marshall
Also known as:
  • Cardiganshire
  • Sir Aberteifi

See individual sites for details

Added by Kammer

Show  |  Hide
Web searches for Ceredigion

Sites/Groups in this region:

8 posts
Banc-y-Geufron Kerbed Cairn
3 posts
Banc Blaenegnant Round Cairn
3 posts
Banc Rhosgoch Fach Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Banc y Warren Enclosure
32 posts
Bedd Taliesin Chambered Cairn
20 posts
Bryngwyn Bach Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
5 posts
Bryn Goleu Round Cairn
11 posts
Bryn Rhosau Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Bryn Rhudd Cairn(s)
20 posts
Bryn y Gorlan Stone Circle
1 post
Bwlch-y-Crwys Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Caer Allt-Goch Hillfort
4 posts
Cae'r Arglwyddes I Round Cairn
3 posts
Caer Lletty-Llwyd Hillfort
3 posts
Caer Penrhos Hillfort
16 posts
Cantre'r Gwaelod Mesolithic site
2 posts
Capel Bangor Camp Hillfort
24 posts
Carn Fflur Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
16 posts
Carn Gron Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
Carn Nant-y-Llys Cairn(s)
8 posts
Carn Penrhiwllwydog Cairn(s)
12 posts
Carn Saith-Wraig Cairn(s)
1 post
Carreg Samson Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Carreg Samson (Llethr) Standing Stone / Menhir
14 posts
Castell Bach and Castell Mawr Hillfort
10 posts
Castell Bach, Cwmtydu Cliff Fort
7 posts
Castell Bach (Penbryn) Cliff Fort
11 posts
Castell Bwa-Drain Hillfort
12 posts
Castell Flemish Hillfort
1 post
Castell Moeddyn Hillfort
12 posts
Castell Rhyfel Hillfort
12 posts
Castle Grogwynion Hillfort
14 posts
Cefn Cerrig Cairn(s)
11 posts
Cerrig yr Wyn Standing Stones
10 posts
Cnwch Eithinog Cairn(s)
9 posts
Cnwch Eithinog Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Copa Hill Ancient Mine / Quarry
8 posts
Craig Ysradmeurig Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Crug Cou Round Barrow(s)
7 posts
Cwmere Farm Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Cylch Derwyddol Stone Circle
1 post
Darren Camp Hillfort
20 posts
Dolgamfa Circle Kerbed Cairn
1 post
Ffynnon-Wen (Llangybi) Sacred Well
6 posts
Foel y Mwnt Promontory Fort
11 posts
Fron Goch Camp Hillfort
3 posts
Gelli Round Barrow Round Barrow(s)
6 posts
Groes Fawr Cist
1 post
Hen Gaer Hillfort
5 posts
Llech Bron Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Llethr Brith Round Cairn
1 post
Llwyn Crwyn Round Barrow(s)
22 posts
Moel y Llyn, Ceulanamaesmawr Megalithic Cemetery
7 posts
Nant-y-Maen Standing Stone / Menhir
12 posts
Old Warren Hillfort Hillfort
49 posts
Pendinas Hillfort Hillfort
14 posts
Pendinas Lochtyn Hillfort
24 posts
Pen-y-Bannau Hillfort
3 posts
2 sites
Pen-y-Castell
4 posts
Pen-y-Felin Wynt Hillfort
14 posts
Pen-y-Ffrwyd Llwyd Camp Hillfort
3 posts
Pen-y-Graig (Llanarth) Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
10 posts
Pen-y-Gurnos Round Barrow(s)
Pen Banc Cairn(s)
7 posts
Pen Glog Round Cairn
21 posts
Pen y Foel Goch Cairn(s)
3 posts
2 sites
Plas Gogerddan
1 post
31 sites
Pumlumon and its Environs
1 post
Tan-y-Ffordd Hillfort
2 posts
Trichrug Sacred Hill
1 post
Whilgarn Cairn(s)
21 posts
Ysbyty Cynfyn Christianised Site
11 posts
Y Garn (Carn Gron) Round Cairn
Sites of disputed antiquity:
10 posts
Llwyn-on-Fach Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Nant-y-Ffrwd Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Penbryn Pillar Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Penmaen-Gwyn Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Penrhyn-Coch War Memorial Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Pond Nant y Cagal Stones Standing Stones
4 posts
St Tyssilio's Churchyard Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Y Garreg Fawr Burial Chamber

News

Add news Add news

Prehistoric forest arises in Cardigan Bay


Skeletal trees of Borth forest, last alive 4,500 years ago and linked to lost kingdom of Cantre'r Gwaelod, appear at shoreline... continues...
moss Posted by moss
21st February 2014ce

Prehistoric landscape uncovered at Borth


From the RCAHMW blog at
http://heritageofwalesnews.blogspot.com/2012/03/prehistoric-landscape-uncovered-at.html

"It’s a race against tide this week at Borth in Ceredigion... continues...
blossom Posted by blossom
13th March 2012ce
Edited 14th March 2012ce

1,000-year-old fishing trap found on Google Earth


Britain's most ancient fishing trap has been discovered off the coastline of Wales after research carried out on Google Earth.

The 853ft (260m) long construction is thought to have been built 1,000 years ago, around the time of the Domesday Book, using large rocks placed on a river bed... continues...
Pilgrim Posted by Pilgrim
16th March 2009ce
Edited 17th March 2009ce

Iron Age Site Dig Open to Public


From an article published on the BBC News web site on 6th August 2006:
Archaeologists excavating an Iron Age farmstead in west Wales say the site may have been home to "several families" as early as 200 BC... continues...
Kammer Posted by Kammer
6th August 2006ce
Edited 10th August 2006ce

Ceredigion Archaeology Day School

A day school aimed at anyone who is interested in the history and archaeology of Ceredigion is running on Saturday 4th March between 10.50 a.m. and 4.30 p.m.

The event is taking place at the Hugh Owen Lecture Theatre, Aberystwyth University [sic].

Cambria Archaeology
Kammer Posted by Kammer
24th February 2006ce

Roman [sic] lead industry found in bog


From an article published on the BBC News web site on 29th July 2005:
Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a Roman lead smelting site in a peat bog in Ceredigion... continues...
Kammer Posted by Kammer
3rd August 2005ce
Edited 7th February 2006ce

Bronze Age Farms Discovered In Ceredigion Field


Archaeologists were called in to investigate the site near Llandysul after workmen clearing farmland for a new Welsh Development Agency industrial estate noticed dark circles in the soil.

Cambria Archaeology workers then identified several large circular graves from the Bronze Age... continues...
Posted by BrigantesNation
22nd August 2003ce
Edited 7th February 2006ce

Latest posts for Ceredigion

Showing 1-10 of 1,099 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Llethr Brith (Round Cairn) — Miscellaneous

At c1,722ft Llethr Brith is a reasonably hefty hill for Mid Wales and, in my opinion, well worth a visit in its own right simply for some excellent views toward Teifi Pools, Cwmdeuddwr and, as it happens, Pen y Bannau hill fort. That it is crowned by a substantial, if somewhat vandalised Bronze Age is, as they say, a bonus.

A dead end minor road heads east from the B4343 at Ffair-Rhos allowing punters access to the shores of the aforementioned Teifi Pools. Just after some enclosed fields to one's left a path can be discerned ascending the hillside... follow this and 'up' is the only real direction needed, to be fair.

According to the OS the cairn, sharing the summit with a lonely little tarn, is:

"A round cairn, 14m in diameterb & 0.5m high, having a modern marker cairn set upon its E side." J.Wiles 26.07.04
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
17th January 2018ce

Moel y Llyn, Ceulanamaesmawr (Megalithic Cemetery) — Folklore

Llyn Moel y Llyn - the hill's haunting upland tarn - is, it would appear, referenced in Caer Arglwyddes, 'The Lady's Field', sited below to the west. According to Dr Gwilym Morus: "I had a conversation with an old lady who’s father had been born at Cae’r Arglwyddes, and according to her the name of the farm refers to a ‘lady of the lake’ folktale about the small lake up on Moel-y-llyn".

So, yet another reason to visit this enigmatic northern outlier of Pumlumon crowned by a quartet of Bronze Age cairns....

https://welshmythology.com/tag/cwm-einion/
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
1st January 2018ce

Pen y Foel Goch (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Should the somewhat more adventurous visitors to Ceredigion happen - whether by chance or design - to arrive at the hamlet of Ponterwyd, astride the A44, with a desire to head north... I dare say that, upon pondering awhile (as you do) they may well be tempted to emulate the locals and take the single track 'short cut' across Pumlumon in lieu of the looping, coastal route via Aberystwyth. And why not, since, although by no means endless, the possibilities that will present themselves are nonetheless multiplex, albeit at the mercy of the not infrequently inclement weather? Particularly for a traveller with a megalithically calibrated mind and/or an eye for an inspiring landscape: one, even today, still infused with legend; that subliminal, pseudo-metaphysical condiment forever seasoning the human story. For this is the land of Glyndwr and Taliesin, where almost every summit is crowned by a Bronze Age cairn, as if echoes of mighty deeds literally turned to stone upon the Medusa's searing gaze. Ah, if only these mountains could talk, what tales would they tell, eh? Well, perhaps all is not lost in the mists of time, for listen carefully and Pumlumon really does speak for itself: the 'piping' call of the soaring Red Kite; the cacophony of the nascent Hafren (Severn, Britain's longest river), Wye and Rheidol as they cascade from their lofty sources upon the main ridge following heavy rain; the wind audible in ubiquitous long grass concealing wetlands which once ensured Henry II's knights floundered to their doom...

But what of the green foothills which sweep northward toward Dyffryn Dyfi from Nant-y-Moch, fleetingly glimpsed upon traversing our aforementioned minor road? Surely but a minor diversion before entering the domain of Idris and, on.. er.. somewhat firmer historical ground, Vortigen, Owain Gwynedd and Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, not to mention Edward Longshanks himself? The answer to that is, in every respect, a resounding 'NO'. Firstly, access to the area is far from straightforward, it being necessary to negotiate the descent of Cwm Ceulan to Tal-y-Bont and approach via very minor roads exiting the A487 to the north; secondly, there is simply so much to see... from one of Wales' premier waterfalls (Pistyll y Llyn), Moel y Llyn (with it's very own 'lady of the lake' tale, to Cwm Einion. Ah exquisite Cwm Einion, perhaps better known to the occasional tourist as 'Artist's Valley' owing to formative visits from one JMW Turner and, much more recently, home to a certain Mr Plant who (apparently) was inspired to write 'Stairway to Heaven' here with some other bloke amongst the ancient tilio-acerion native woodland. Furthermore, with almost every hill top once again crowned by a Bronze Age cairn, stone circle or chambered cairn, the Citizen Cairn'd must really take notice...

Which brings me, eventually, to Foel Goch, a seemingly minor coastal hill overlooking the Afon Dyfi as it nears the end of its short journey to the sea from Creiglyn Dyfi, the latter cradled beneath the mighty crags of Aran Fawddwy. I say 'eventually' because I make a farce of the initial approach by car... losing my nerve as I pass Bedd Taliesin and backtracking to the A487 to finally park up, rather sheepishly (appropriately enough in these parts) in a farmyard east of Tre'r-ddol, at Llety-lwydin, Cwm Cletwr, to my mind the only feasible option. Now on foot, the road descends very sharply from here to a T-junction, the right hand selection arriving in due course at a habitation on the left overflowing with free range chickens and other creatures pleasing to the senses. A public footpath sets off to the east ranging above the northern bank of the Afon Clettwr, the initial lush, green pasture giving way to a more coarse, upland domain. That'll be Foel Goch, then.

As usual I haven't done my homework - note to self: don't... it's far more interesting this way - so, having found the 'Cairns' depicted upon my map here, upon the southern flank of the hill/mini mountain, to be less than convincing, I head for the obvious, large cairn crowning the skyline to the north-east. Clearly this must be Pen y Foel Goch. Except, of course, it's nothing of the sort, being in actual fact Carn Wen, a little below and to the west of the summit monument at SN68979274. According to RCAHMW (Dave Leighton, 30/7/12) this, one of numerous 'White Cairns' to be found in Wales measures "13m (N-S) by 17m (E-W), its shape distorted by slippage of material down steep west side of the summit; height 1m-2m." Yeah, it's a pretty substantial cairn... but the compelling reason to come here is the location which, to these eyes, is extraordinary for the relative low altitude. It really is. The stunning Dyffryn Dyfi, its river meandering to its all-inclusive conclusion, takes centre stage... but there is much more: the brooding, central ridge of Pumlumon surmounting the horizon to the south-east, Cadair Idris - with the seriously be-cairned, tautological Tarren Hills to its left - soaring sentinel to the approx north. Things (arguably) get even more interesting nearer to hand, initially just across the Afon Clettwr at Caer Arglwyddes, 'The Lady's Field', where there are a number of cairns, one with impressive cist still in situ visited back in 2012. But why 'The Lady's Field'? Well, according to Dr Gwilym Morus (Welshmythology.com)... "All became clear when I had a conversation with an old lady who’s father had been born at Cae’r Arglwyddes, and according to her the name of the farm refers to a ‘lady of the lake’ folktale about the small lake up on Moel-y-llyn". Things begin to fall into place... since Moel y Llyn, rising due south-east of Carn Wen, possesses a quartet of cairns in addition to its legendary feminine bathing facility.

A short, yet sweet scramble brings me finally to Pen y Foel Goch, featuring a further substantial cairn at SN69519285, that is a little to the approx north-west of the actual summit. Again according to Dave Leighton, this "measures some 10m across, allowing for distortion caused by slippage of material down the steeper west side. Robbing has left the eastern perimeter of the cairn as a grassy ring, its height 0.3m". If anything, the vista to be enjoyed from this monument is even more impressive/expansive than from its neighbour below to the west. The fundamental difference, I guess, is the sight of yet another cairn, upon Cerrig Blaencletwr-Fawr (aka Esgair Foel-ddu) just under a mile distant to the east, beckoning the footsore modern antiquarian onward with its silent siren call. Nevertheless, what with a significant height loss to contend with - all too often the tired hill walker's nemesis - I immediately give up any notion of an attempt today as falling within the 'so near, yet so far' category... only to find my impetuosity, if not curiosity, has decided otherwise and launched me half way down the slope before counter-revolutionary reason can react. Ha! Emotion over reason? Right on!

The intervening terrain is rough, trackless, featuring areas of severe bog. Standard practice for Pumlumon, to be fair. However the cairn is worth the not inconsiderable effort and is again exquisitely sited, this time gazing down into the equally compelling Cwm Einion at SN70779256. Now I've no idea whether Mr Turner made a foray up here - to this very spot - to be similarly entranced by the ever-changing light playing upon the legendary Moel y Llyn to immediate south-east. I doubt it. Hey, perhaps Timothy Spall might know? But if he did, it would explain a lot, methinks... for his work invokes, nay encapsulates the vibe I feel at places such as this. Mr Leighton reckons the much more mundane technical specifics are "11m NE-SW by 9.0m & 0.9m high". Unlike both Foel Goch's cairns Cerrig Blaencletwr-Fawr's monument has unfortunately been defaced, given a hollow centre. The reasoning behind this is even more obscure than the usual 'built by ignorant muppets' since, clearly, no such fool has taken shelter here in a very, very long time, to judge by the presence of a tenacious tree of indeterminate (to me) type occupying the space. Now that, together with the other 'Plant' life formerly found within The Artist's Valley, I can live with. Way to go, my woody stemmed friend! As if to mark the moment.. a rainbow arcs across the valley. Time to leave. Since it is a long way back... and who knows what other legendary idiosyncrasies these unassuming northern 'foot hills' of Pumlumon have up their collective 'sleeves' to bestow upon unsuspecting punters after dark? Hey, perhaps some of the more artistic people associated with this magical area were brave enough to find out? Perhaps.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
31st December 2017ce
Edited 3rd January 2018ce

Fron Goch Camp (Hillfort) — Folklore

Dick the Fiddler's Money

The adventures of rakish Richard (a 'fiddler' in more ways than one, not to mention waste of space husband to his long suffering wife) featuring his dodgy bewitched seashell currency obtained whilst returning home from Darowen. The hamlet displayed some pseudo-political 'comment' of very dubious intellect in its windows at the time of my visit. Hence I did not attempt to engage any local - why waste my time? - instead making straight for the excellent Fron Goch Camp rising above. Superb viewpoint, it has to be said.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb27.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce
Edited 20th December 2017ce

Fron Goch Camp (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fron Goch Camp</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
28th September 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 1,099 posts. Most recent first | Next 10