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Fargo Plantation Henge

Henge (Destroyed)

Miscellaneous

This miniature version of a Class II henge was first discovered in 1937 through pieces of Peterborough ware.
A couple of local boy scouts, investigating rabbit scrapes in Fargo plantation, had brought the sherds to the attention of J.F.S. Stone, who had been working in the area for a number of years. Although no surface features where visible, it was decided to excavate the site, which was found to be about a metre below the present surface.

A small sub-oval enclosure, approx. 30 ft. in diameter and markedly asymmetrical in outline, was uncovered, with causeways in the north and south. The northern one being much wider than the southern one. No surviving traces of a bank were found, although Stone interpreted the ditch sections as indicating an outside bank.

Within the central area of the henge, a pit had been dug and lined with turfs. This contained part of a burial (the spine and ribcage of a young male, minus the head, arms, pelvis and legs), together with a beaker and base of a food vessel. Two cremations where also placed next to this burial. A third cremation was uncovered in the north-east corner and to the east of the central grave, another pit had been dug which contained a cist and a further cremation, both considered to be secondary to the original burial.
The ditch silting contained an unaccompanied cremation in the upper part, a shard of Late Neolithic Mortlake ware, and a piece of Stonehenge rhyolite (Bluestone). Antler fragments were also recovered from the primary ditch silts, together with flint flakes and four flint scrapers.

The stated dimensions of the henge were:
Internal diameter ranged from c.3.96-6.10m, with the ditch width 1.52-1.68 m.
Orientation is NNE, SSW

See the enclosed plan/section for a clearer picture of this site
Chance Posted by Chance
14th November 2009ce
Edited 14th November 2009ce

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