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The Hoar Stone

Long Barrow

Miscellaneous

Details of Long Barrow on Pastscape

A Neolithic long barrow is visible as earthworks and a pair of upstanding stones on aerial photographs. The site comprises an oval mound which measures 48.0m long, and 28.0m wide across the centre, at which point it has been almost flattened; it attains a height of about 0.5m at the east. The longer axis of the mound is oriented ENE-WSW, and it is surrounded by a circa 2 metre wide raised strip, likely to be the result of plough damage. This site has been mapped from aerial photographs as part of the Cotswolds Hills National Mapping Programme.

SO 96490659 Hoar Stone (NAT) Long Barrow (NR) (1)
A long barrow 120 ft long by 90 ft wide and 3 ft high, orientated east to west with a large stone, the Hoar Stone, placed at the east end, probably as some kind of fake portal. To the south of the centre of the barrow is a large prostrate slab; the capstone of the chamber excavated by Anthony Preston in 1806, in which he found the remains of 8 or 9 skeletons. The chamber was divided into two segments. (2-4)
Hoar Stone (NAT) Long Barrow and Burial Chambers (NR) (Remains of) (NAT) (5)
An extremely mutilated long barrow, oriented east-west situated in arable, below the crest of a wide spur at about 700 ft (213.0 m) above sea level. The mound, now extensively spread by ploughing, is 48.0 m long, and 28.0 m wide across the centre, at which point it has been almost flattened; it attains a height of about 0.5 m at the east and 0.9 m at the west end. There are no traces of side ditches. The 'Hoar Stone' (name verified, and in local use) or 'Flight Stone' (a) is a large lozenge shaped, weathered sarsen, 1.9 m high to its point, 2.0 m wide at base and 1.0 m thick, it leans at about 30o out of vertical. The kite shaped capstone, 2.7 m long, 2.0 m wide and 0.3 m thick appears to be in situ. A chamber (with? dividing wall), now full of limestone fragments, is partly visible beneath the slab. Several earth-fast stones, set on edge, are visible on the unploughed portion of the mound (24.0 m east/west by 9.5 m north/south in extent) which is now under a cover of uncultivated vegetation. Long barrow resurveyed at 1:2500 on AM. (6)
A Neolithic long barrow is visible as earthworks and a pair of upstanding stones on aerial photographs. The site is centred on SO 9649 0659 and comprises an oval mound which measures 48.0m long, and 28.0m wide across the centre, at which point it has been almost flattened; it attains a height of about 0.5m at the east. The longer axis of the mound is oriented ENE-WSW, and it is surrounded by a circa 2 metre wide raised strip, likely to be the result of plough damage. The pair of capstones are clearly visible on aerial photographs, and their dimensions compare with those given by authority 6 above (7).

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SOURCE TEXT
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( 1) Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date) OS 6" 1960
( 2) by Glyn E Daniel 1950 The prehistoric chamber tombs of England and Wales Page(s)221
( 3) Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 1960 (O'Neill and Grinsell) 79 Page(s)77
( 4) Aerial photograph RAF 541/17 4091-2, 14-MAY-1948
( 5) Ordnance Survey Map (Scale / Date) OS 25" 1919
( 6a) Oral information, correspondence (not archived) or staff comments
( 6) Field Investigators Comments F1 JWS 08-OCT-77
( 7) Scheduled Monument Notificationn 20-Aug-1998
( 8) Oblique aerial photograph reference number NMR SO 9606/6 NMR 23685/07 18-OCT-2004
Chance Posted by Chance
10th July 2012ce

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