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Lady Mary's Wood (Hillfort)

Lady Mary's Fort must have been some place back in the Iron Age nestling under the summit of nearby Walton Hill. Also in the fort is a mausoleum which is in various states of decay.

Despite the vegetation I thought the ramparts and ditches were easily enough found especially to the south east were there are multiple lines of defence and a possible entrance. Another possible entrance is to the north west, our entrance, with an inner rampart almost encircling the whole fort. Steep slopes to the east also were used in the construction. Canmore must have had a bad time of it but we certainly found more defences despite the vegetation. Perhaps falling into them helped.

Head south east from Cupar on the A914 taking the second minor road south. At the first corner park and look north. Inside the wood is the fort (and mausoleum). Follow the track through the field until the wood. Unwittingly we walked all the way round and approached from near the top of Walton Hill and therefore took a more northerly approach which also showed the steep slopes of the northern section. Near the small lakes eastern end look for a small path which leads straight to the centre of the fort over one of the ramparts we found (or fell into).

From the forts east side take path to the edge of the wood which obviously was the path we should have taken but it was a good mistake to make. Heading back south west towards our parking spot we were treated to beautiful views of The Lomonds, the dominant high spots of Fife.

Visited 27/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th November 2017ce

Dun Dearduil South (Hillfort)

Just to the south west and slightly downhill from Dearduils highest point, home to the wonderful North fort, is another fort. This one, however, hasn't aged quite so well.

A lot of the walls have fallen down the slopes but rough boulders still surround the fort especially to the south. Canmore suggests these walls could have been up to 5m wide surrounding an area up to 31m in length and 26m wide.

After that it was find a nice spot for something to eat and a easier route in which to walk or fall down the hill. Mr T and myself showing how to fall down holes and Mrs T showing how to stay upright.

Visited 24/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th November 2017ce

Westerton (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Follow Mr Brands directions and you will find that the stone and its cup marks haven't moved. We couldn't see the man on the stone so presumably he has moved on. Quite what this man was up to I'm not clearly sure but it looks like some kind of fertility symbol. The picture on the link seems get a grip of the situation.

The stone has been fenced in and the entrance is near the wall.

Visited 26/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th November 2017ce

Caherdaniel (Stone Fort / Dun)

During my planing for the next trip around the Iveragh Peninslua, I found an interesting ring structure on Google Earth near Caherdaniel West.

After checking some books and the great Historic Environment Viewer from NMS I realized that this must be Caherdaniel Ringfort. Actually there are two ringforts (KE106-063001- and KE106-062----) only 100m apart from each other. But the first one is the far better one. As access to the ringfort looked quite easy, I decided to include it for my next drive around The Ring of Kerry.

You can park your car on the N70 at N51 46 16.2 W10 06 33.3 between Ballycarnahan and Caherdaniel West, where there is a sharp right bend and a small access road. Walk along the access road and you can already see the ringfort.

I wonder, why I never noticed the ringfort before, as I drove The Ring Of Kerry several times, but always clockwise. To my apology, I have to say that the ringfort is much more visible, if you drive The Ring Of Kerry anti-clockwise.

Unfortunately while visiting the ringfort, it rained heavily, so I just stayed for a short time to make at least some (fuzzy) photos.

Visited November 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
4th November 2017ce

Cool (Standing Stones)

The name should be Cool East (refer to KE078-007----).

Visited November 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
3rd November 2017ce

Moyne (Standing Stones)

This stone pair stands in the center of a medieval ecclesiastical enclosure, west of a medieval church. Both stones are ~1.7m high.

This really is a tranquill place, in the next field you can see Kinlough Castle.

Both sites are highly recommend and easy to access.

Visited June 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
3rd November 2017ce

Killeen (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Site 15 of the Clew Bay Archaeological Trail is Killeen Graveyard and Cross Slab. Parking and access is very easy.

In the graveyard there is a standing stone, leaning precariously, which was christianised during the seventh century with a Maltese Cross.

Visited June 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
3rd November 2017ce

Slivia 1 (Hillfort)

Follow the signs from the centre of another beautiful village, this time Slivia, once again parking the near the information board. The hillfort is around 600m away to the south east. Once again when the trees clear it is another astonishing array of white lime stone walls. Some of the original late Bronze Age dykes remain which surround the top of this fantastic viewpoint.

The inner walls stand at an astounding 5m high and must be at least the same wide. I managed to walk the 300 meters all the way round with the only real gap being the entrance which is on the eastern side approaching from the north. Even the outer wall and ramparts are enormous. These cover the south, south east and south west. They stand at least 2m tall with the ditch being 2m wide. Just for good measure there is further defence with a dry stane dyke lying to south of the ditch. Just for size it is a mind blowing place, I've certainly never seen nothing like it.

Like a lot of these forts it was used in later wars. The nearby Mount Ermada was protected by this and several other forts in the Isonzo Wars (see Misc) of 1916 between the Italians and Hapsburgs. Trenches and shacks can be found within the walls to the north east. In the beautiful places horrendous things happen and this area has had its fair share. However Carlo Marchesetti, an archaeologist who I'd read a lot about, restored a lot of the fort and is considered the areas greatest historian.

It is very fitting that the fort now bears his name, so another glass was raised to him.

Visited 18/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd November 2017ce

Ballynastaig (Stone Fort / Dun)

Sorry for the images, due to the vegetation it was nearly impossible to get better ones.

The coordinates for the site are wrong, here are the actual ones:
N53 06 06.3 W8 51 57.5

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
3rd November 2017ce

Sales (Hillfort)

Once again we parked at a crossroads this time in the village of Sales, another beautiful wee place. Across the road there is a memorial to the local Slovene and Italian Partisans so it seemed apt that we were going to visit the hillfort that centuries ago had also defended this area.

Head north from here until the tarred road runs out at a crossroads. Luckily a local man was working on a wall and gave us precise directions to the fort. Go west and keep going following the path until a filled in (by leaves etc) pond, man made centuries ago to help feed animals. Go round the pond and head south. This will lead directly to a notice board which gives info about the fort.

Climb west over a couple of ancient walls until the huge rampart is met. The ditch for this is over 4m wide with the ramparts themselves still standing at 3m tall. There is 500m of this all round the top of the hill. Funnily enough if this fort had no trees it would resemble Down Law in Fife. (a stretch of imagination but reasonable I think.) The main entrance is on the south west and is 3.5m wide. Also in the middle of the fort there appears to be a cairn with perhaps a cist beginning to appear.

I walked all the way round the fort and climbed to the top of the southern wall. Looking down it seemed the whole of the south face was a wall, this must have been an important place and a place of habitation. Land around here seems, nowadays, to quite fertile so maybe back in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age they decided to stay. One thing they did know about was how to built walls, most of them are still standing.

Then it was back down the hill retracing our steps back to the crossroads. On the other side of the road, a wee pub and fantastic food. I raised a glass to the memorial across the road!

Visited 17/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd November 2017ce

Rupinpiccolo (Hillfort)

We parked at main crossroads in the middle of the small but beautiful Carse village of Rupinpiccolo, near the information board. Take the tarred road heading east until it ends then follow a track heading south, marked by white/red painted signs, until the trees clear. This was a very pleasant walk in nice warm weather, the week before had seen torrential rain.

In this clearing there is the astonishing and dazzling white limestone east entrance to the fort. It is a stunning place. On the western side there is a similar steep access probably used to transport large weapons. The walls are gigantic being almost 4m tall and are at least 4 to 5m wide. They encircle the hill coming to at least 240m in length. Further down the hill there is a second defensive wall to the south. To the west there has been quarrying but luckily the locals seem to have repaired a lot of the damage.

Sadly this area, as we all know, has seen a lot of war through the centuries and this fort was used as a gun emplacement during World 1. Evidence of this can be seen on the summit of the hill. Trieste, one of Europe's major ports, is just over the hills to the south.

I later found out that there are three more forts nearby surrounding Rupinpiccolo. In fact all the Slovenian/Italian border area is covered in prehistory. What an excellent reason to go back, which we will.

Visited 17/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
3rd November 2017ce

Ardrahan (Standing Stone / Menhir)

This is a phallus stone, unfortunatley when we visited the site, the stone was knocked over by someone (see link section for a beter picture).

The location of the site is wrong, actually it is:
N53 09 27.1 W8 48 29.1

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
2nd November 2017ce

Corrower (Rath)

While visiting Corrower Standing Stone I realize a odd megalithic structure in another field. From the road it looked like a big megalithic tomb, so I jumped over a gate to went about 120m up to the small mound to see what I have discovered.

To be honest, when I came closer to the stones, I couldn't spot, if this is really a megalithic object. As some of the stones are big boulders, I don't think it is just field clearance.

According to the National Monuments Service the mound is a Rath (MA040-046----), but unfortunately there is no reference of the stones.

What do you think?

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
2nd November 2017ce

Behy (Court Tomb)

While we are visited Céide Fields we also tooked the chance to see Behy Court Tomb (about 400m from the car park). I asked for directions to the tomb and one of the ladies from the staff gave me detailed information how to get to the tomb.

Only parts of the tomb can be seen, as most of the tomb is still buried in the peat.

Nevertheless a nice addition to a visit of the highly recommended visitor centre of Céide Fields.

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
2nd November 2017ce

Rosdoagh (Court Tomb)

While driving around northwest Mayo and the Bellmullet Peninsula, we also passed Rosdoagh Court Tomb.

It lies behind a modern house, but parking and access is very easy. Simply go straight on, when the 'main' roads bends right angular.

To be honest there is not much to see anymore, the information board is more impressive than the tomb itself.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
2nd November 2017ce

Abbeyquarter North (Passage Grave)

If you would like to drive around a megalithic tomb, here is your chance, as the remains of this passage grave lies in the center of a roundabout!

This and the fact that there is also a crucifix and two statues errected in the middle of the tomb makes Abbeyquarter North one of the most weired megalithic sites in Ireland.

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st November 2017ce

Fenagh (Glebe) (Wedge Tomb)

I think this entry is not valid. According to the NMS (LE029-002----) the tomb with this coordinates isn't a Wedge Tomb, but a Court Tomb and it is called Commons. Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st November 2017ce

Commons (Court Tomb)

On our drive from Dublin airport to our cottage in Ballina (County Mayo), we passed this tomb. Because we were in a hurry, I was only able to take a zoom shot from the road.

Visited May 2010
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st November 2017ce

Whitebridge (Stone Fort / Dun)

From the hut circle at Duntirhal look east, the first hill is the ridge leading towards the dun, the second is the wonderfully shaped Ben Sgurrach. Compared to Dun Dearduil (see the Thelonius fieldnote) this is a sleepwalk as underfoot conditions are solid unlike the partially flooded track to the east of Whitebridge.

The ridge leads to a wall which still has one or two stones standing, this is also the front door. Sadly most of the walls have fallen down in the surrounding slopes. Surviving wall indicates that this must have been two to three metres wide. At the west the fort is 7m wide and increases to 9m in the east. It is 26m in length.

Happily the fort still has inhabitants. Quite a few brown mice were running about and managed to avoid our boots.

After revisiting the hut circles we made our way back to Whitebridge as the first hint of darkness appeared. Ben Sgurrach started to change its heathery colour. A wonderful end to another fine day in the hills to the east of Loch Ness, this time in the excellent company of the Blackburners :-)

Visited 24/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st October 2017ce

Duntirhal (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

After climbing, walking and falling the down the Dearduils it was south to Whitebridge on the B862. We parked at the bridge, which is very close to the impressive Old Bridge, and headed south, through the chalets to a track. Follow this and climb the small hill onto a very flat plateau. From the gate look westish and the walls of the hut circle can be seen.

There are a lot of hut circles in this area and this was an added bonus, as were the two others nearer the dun. It is large being almost 18m wide with collapsed walls up to 4m wide. Sadly the entrance, to the north, has been houked and sits at 1.5m wide. Despite the damage we thought the site impressive.

With Ben Sgurrach towering above it is a wonderful place.

Visited 24/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
31st October 2017ce

Dun Dearduil North (Hillfort)

24/10/17 – Some places really grab me when I’m having a look on the OS maps. From the first time I noticed these two hillforts on Dun Dearduil I’ve been wanting to visit. When Drew mentioned them a few months back on here it was too good an opportunity to miss.

Dun Dearduil isn’t the easiest of places to visit though and that’s to put it mildly. Very cliffy on the west side and a big river to cross. The only access we could see from the map was from the east. Starting point was the track just south of Balnagaeline (NH5536625781). Nice walk along this track past Dirichurachan where after that the track turns right towards the trees and Dun Dearduil beyond. From this point onwards the walk took a more adventurous turn. No path, wet rocks, bracken, rotting trees to clamber over – it had it all! We climbed the small top, east of the forts first. The view from here of Dun Dearduil, with Loch Ness and the hills behind – just wow. Sunshine as well. From here we had to drop steeply 50m or so to then climb up to the forts. Very tricky terrain but we made it up the NE ridge to the top. Happy us to finally make it :-)

The north fort is fantastic, like a grassed over mini Tap o’Noth. The second fort, a short distance to the south is nice as well. The location of the forts is as good as it gets. When the sun came out, it felt like there could be no better place to be. We had our sandwiches sitting on the steep east side of the hill, looking out over the wonderful landscape. This really is a lovely area to visit.

From here it was again a tough bash back to the track. Never fallen over so many times in my life!

Drew, Mrs T and me all made it back to the car in one piece (a minor miracle given the terrain). Top day out that had a little bit of everything I love when visiting sites even though my legs were still feeling it two days after.

A proper adventure :-)
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th October 2017ce

Gleninsheen (Wedge Tomb)

Actually there are three Wedge Tombs in this field (Cl. 10, Cl. 11 and Cl. 15), but when I visited Gleninsheen, back in 2008, I was not aware of Cl. 10.

This nice little tomb lies in the south west corner of the field and lies closest to the road (R480), from which you can clearly see it.

So if you visit Poulnabrone, don't hesitate also to include this lovely tomb to your itinerary.

Visited May 2008
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
29th October 2017ce

Whitebridge (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Coming down from Whitebridge we spotted 2 hut circles. One listed by Canmore and one which will be.

NH 4948 1464

The listed circle is sadly in a sad state having taking a battering from cattle, agriculture and vegetation. Still it can be clearly made out from the dun being on the southern side. Sitting at over 13m wide with walls at 0.4m, with the entrance to the south it has magnificent views of Ben Sgurrach, the dun and neighbouring hills.

NH4953914668

We discovered this hut circle whilst coming down from the dun to find NH49481464. It is in far better condition and sits at about 4.5m wide nestling in the shadow of the dun, the boulders almost making a complete circle. A new find to complete a fantastic day. Historic Scotland has been sent a report/photos via the DES form and will hopefully appear on their site shortly.

Visited 24/10/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
28th October 2017ce
Edited 11th November 2017ce

Little Meg (Stone Circle)

Visited today, the field is in an awful state, ankle deep mud and puddles just as deep, .massive pile of manure by the circle. Wellies would have done but I only had walking boots. Had to negotiate the shit pile as it was the lesser of two evils, went in almost knee deep. The ground I immediately around the stones isn't much better. At least the cows in the field didn't accost me.
Also found the site very hard to find from long Meg but managed it with a bit of trespassing and a nod from a farmer. I'd advise taking the road route as posted below. Wish I had.
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
28th October 2017ce

Tulloch Boundary Marker 33 (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art)

From the top of Brimmond you get marvellous views all round. The view to the north has Elrick Hill and its enclosure so I decided to climb down following a track which left the main track half way down. At the bottom there is a minor road and across from this another road, road is optimistic, which leads to the bottom of the valley.

Just before the wee car park jump the fence and head west, the boulder and marker stone are easily spotted being next to the fence overlooking the overgrown Littlemill Burn.

The boulder is almost 1m square and just over 0.5 deep with the cup mark measuring 9cm wide and 3cm deep.

With that it was up the Elrick Hill to find nothing. Long grass and ferns covered the area so another winter time visit required. A nice walk with great views to the west more than made up for the lack of site especially when the main view is Bennachie.

Visited 7/9/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd October 2017ce
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