The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Latest Posts — Fieldnotes

Previous 25 | Showing 26-50 of 17,259 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 25

Westerloh 2 (Passage Grave)

Due to the fact that the tomb is still buried deep and heavily overgrown in the undergrowth, here follows the description from the German Wikipedia:

The 5.0 × 1.5 meter east-west orientated chamber lies deep in the ground. Of the original ten support stones and the four capstones missing one each. Of the entrance stones is only one in situ. One entrance and the capstone of the entrance, which is located in the middle of the south side, are missing. An enclosure or a hill can not be proven.

The tomb lies on private land, drive from Westerloh on the K240 to Lähden. After about 1.7km you come to a junction, where the forest begins on both sides of the road. The road "Zum Herthum" to the north leads to the graves Westerloh 2 and Lähden 2, the dirt road to the south to grave Westerloh 1, which is located in a small wood just outside the forest.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
11th November 2018ce

Groß Berßen 10

Groß Berßen 10 or alternatively Deepmoorsteene lies in a bush in the middle of farmland and is totally overgrown and neglected. It is a chamber approximately oriented in east-west direction. A large part of the supporting and capstones are still present. Of the original six capstones only one is missing.

To get to the tomb you leave Groß Berßen on the K159 to the southeast towards the settlement Osterfeld and Lähden. If the trees end right and left, turn south into Moorstraße. Follow this road for about 700 meters (keep to the left at a fork). Then you reach a plant of a petroleum pipeline, where you can park. From here, a path leads to the left (northeast), which you follow for about 200 meters. The tomb is then right about 60 meters away at the end of a green strip between two fields in the brushwood.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
11th November 2018ce

Groß Berßen 9

According to Sprockhoff this tomb is a Hunebed, which are rather rare in Emsland. It should have been 30 x 6m in size. Today, however, the overall site looks so chaotic that it is difficult to imagine the original megalithic tomb. The chamber is 5 x 2 m in size; 6 support stones are still present, including the two boundary stones on the narrow sides. It probably lacks 4 support stones, because it is likely to have acted around a four-yoke chamber, the capstones are missing. The chamber is located in a long enclosure, of which there are 17 stones left. They are partly relocated, so that the extent is not clearly recognizable.

The alternate name Brutsteene (bride stones) indicates that in the past weddings or fertility rituals were performed here. There are other sites in this area, which a similar name origin, like Visbeker Bräutigam or Visbeker Braut.

Groß Berßen 9 is located in a small wood south of the barrow heath "Am Wiesengrund". Drive from Groß Berßen north on the K159 towards Sögel. About 1.3km after the roundabout in Groß Berßen turn left into the road "Am Wiesengrund" and continue for 900m. Park here and walk 200m south to the tomb.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Groß Berßen 7 (Passage Grave)

taken from the "Route of Megalithic Culture" information board:

Excavated...
The grave was first described already in 1825, at that time it was largely hidden in a dune. According to other descriptions of the 19th century the grave was blown free more and more over time. in 1925 besides 28 stones also first finds like pottery sherds and stone artefacts were visible. During an excavation in 1955 the archaeologist Dr. Elisabeth Schlicht examined this grave scientifically. The grave chamber was 9.5 metres long, had five cornerstones and fourteen orthostats. In the middle of the southern longitudinal wall the entrance was marked with a threshold. The bottom of the chamber was paved with small boulders with an overlying layer of granite grus, and between the orthostats remains of dry masonry was found. Blast holes in a shattered, 6-ton capston give evidence of blasting attempts.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Groß Berßen 8 (Passage Grave)

taken from the "Route of Megalithic Culture" information board:

The Pyramids of the North
The chamber of "King's Grave" today consists of 21 existing orthostats and nine capstones, 30 stones of the former enclosure are also extant. For a long time it was especially popular belief taht a king had been laid to rest with his entourage or his family in th large, long grave. Built without any technical aids, one would explain the immense amount of work only for a prominent personality - like the pyramids for the Pharaohs of Egypt. It is not without reason we talk about the "Pyramids of the North" today in connection with the megalithic tombs. The construction of the Pyramids of Gaza is dated from 2,620 to 2,500 BC, thus at least 700 years later than the megalithic tombs of this region.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Hüven-Nord (Passage Grave)

One of the most beautiful megalithic tombs of Emsland and definitely a must see site to visit, if you are in this area!

Drive from Hüven on the L65 northward to Sögel. After you leave Hüven, there is a single house on the right side, right as the forest begins to the right. There is a small area where you can leave the car. A small sign and a forest track leads you to the tomb, which is just a 150m walk from here.

Impressive 22 x 10 m large megalithic tomb with a very well-preserved oval enclosure, where the enclosure stones are relatively large for an Emsland chamber. The oriented chamber in east-west direction is still almost complete. It has a length of about 15 meters, in the middle of a width of 1.50 and at the two ends of about 1.0 meters. 25 supporting stones are available and are in situ. Of the original 11 capstones are still 8 in their original position. The oval enclosure of about 22 meters in length and 10 meters wide is still almost complete, only a few stones are missing.

Revisited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

taken from the "Route of Megalithic Culture" information board:

Of lost treasures

With a total of 52 from originally well over 100 more or less preserved megalithic tombs northern Emsland is virtually "rich in stones". These few visible "treasures" of prehistory include the well-preserved grave "Volbers Megalithic Stones". This tomb is one of the largest graves in the region constisting of eleven bays with 25 orthostats still standing and eleven preserved capstones. The 22 metres long stone surrounding is almost complete. But time is taking its toll. A few years ago one of the capstones slipped into the chamber. With great effort and most recent technical equipment it was tried to manoeuvre the capstone back to its original position. Success was extremely short-dated: After only a few weeks, the stone slipped back into the chamber where it still lies today.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Holte-Lastrup 2 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

This is the northern of the two tombs. Since there are hardly any structures to be recognized by the underbrush, moss-grown and the strong vegetation growth, here is the description from the German Wikipedia:

This site is very similar to the other one (Holte-Lastrup 1). The burial chamber is northeast-southwest oriented and originally also had four pairs of wall stones on the long sides, two end stones and four capstones. According to Sprockhoffs reconstruction drawing it might also be a grand dolmee. In situ, only three wall stones of the northwestern and two of the southeastern long side are preserved. Inside the chamber are two broken into several fragments capstones.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Holte-Lastrup 1 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

This is the southern of the two tombs. Since there are hardly any structures to be recognized by the underbrush and the strong vegetation growth, here is the description from the German Wikipedia:

The tomb has an east-west oriented chamber, which is probably a grand dolmen. In its original condition, it is said to have possessed four pairs of wall stones on the long sides, one endstone each on the narrow sides and four capstones. When Ernst Sprockhoff documented the tomb in 1927, he found the western endstone, two adjoining wall stones of the north and three adjacent wall stones of the south side standing in situ. The western capstone is broken, but is still on the wall stones. The remaining three capstones are broken inside the chamber. A recent documentation has shown that the two eastern wall stones of the north side, which were assumed to be missing by Sprockhoff, are still present.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Holte-Lastrup

Both graves are badly damaged and hard to find. A visit is really worthwhile only if you have already visited all the other tombs in this area. In addition, you should visit the tombs rather in winter because of the strong growth of underbrush, a GPS device is absolutely necessary.

According to Wikipedia a third tomb originally located near these two sites was destroyed in the 19th century.

To find the two tombs, drive southward on the K267 from Lahden to Lastrup. About 1.8km behind Lahden turn left into Clemenskoppel and continue on this road for about 670m, until you come to junction and the fields end on the left side of the road. Park here and take the forest track, which goes in southeast direction. Walk for about 200m, both tombs are left of this track, opposite of a pond. Good luck!

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Herßum (Passage Grave)

Like Lahn 3 Herßum has the same kind of information board, is at least partially signposted, but it has become overgrown in the meantime, because nobody seems to care for the place anymore, which is a pity. Possibly because both sites are not part of the Route of Megalithic Culture or are a bit off the beaten track. Herßum is listed (No 19) in Mamoun Fansa's book "Großsteingräber zwischen Weser und Ems" (ISBN 978-3-89995-626-9, 2009), so it seems that the tomb once had a greater significance.

I think the "official" signposted approach to reach the site is to drive from Holte-Lastrup on the L55 towards Herßum. After about 500m behind Holte-Lastrup turn left into Ahmsener Kirchweg, which turns northeast into a dirt road. Either drive or walk on this dirt road, first are fields left and right of the way, later forest is left hand of the way. After about 430m a signposted beaten track leads northwest into the forest, follow this track and you'll reach the site in about 500m. I missed to turn left into Ahmsener Kirchweg and turned left the next possibility at a farm, turned left after additional 400m and arrived from the other direction.

The tomb is remarkably large and east-west oriented. The site is about 20 meters long and 7m wide, the burial chamber is about 15m long and varies from 2m in the middle to about 1.5m to both ends. Twelve capstones are still present, but all have sunk into the chamber or relocated. Only a few support stones are still in their original positions. The chamber was surrounded by an oval enclosure and lies on a small sandy elevation.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
10th November 2018ce

Lahn 3

Although Lahn 3 is signposted from the road between Lahn and Wehm and although there is an information board, nobody seems to care about the site anymore. Nature demands the place back, which was occupied by the tomb for more than 5.000 years. The chamber (17.5 x 1.6 m) in an elongated mound is heavily destroyed, only single stones are preserved.

To find the site drive from Lahn to Wehn, turn left right before the forest (signposted). After about 120m a small forest track leads to the tomb, which is 80m into the wood.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
8th November 2018ce

taken from the information display:

The oldest and at the same time the most impressive monuments of Lower Saxony are the neolithic megalithic tombs. While today in Lower Saxony about 400 mostly only incompletely preserved tombs are known, the number of originally existing tombs was many times higher.

The extensive destruction is almost entirely due to human intervention in the last two centuries. For example, blocks of boulders, often weighing several tons, were used as building material completely or blasted for house foundations, walls, churches, roads, bridges, dykes, etc., and some were even negotiated in neighboring countries.

The scale of the destruction also illustrates the megalithic tomb Lahn (see Figures 1 and 2) of which there are only a few stones in their original position and a large part has disappeared. The rather large burial chamber, which lay in an elongated hill, had approximately 17.5 x 1.6 m internal dimensions after the reconstruction (Figure 2).

The predominantly ceramic funerary objects (cups, bowls and funnel cups, Figure 3) date the megalithic tombs into the funnel beaker culture (3500 - 2000 BC), in a later section (about 2300 - 2000 BC) of this Neolithic agricultural (single crown, emmer, dwarf wheat, barley) and cattle breeding (cattle, swine, goat, sheep) culture.

Settlement sites of the funnel beaker culture have not yet been fully investigated, but some house plans give hints to the residential buildings of that time. For example, in Wittenwater, district of Uelzen, the post pits of a 15,6 x 6 m house (Figure 4) were discovered, which was divided into several rooms and on the southern side of which a grain millstone was found and possibly a small (grain?) storage.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
8th November 2018ce

Herßum (Passage Grave)

taken from the on site infromation board:

In the dune terrain, "Im großen Sande" is a pretty impressive megalithic tomb, which was built in a younger section of the Neolithic period (about 2300 to 1800 BC) and was used for generations.

From his blueprint, this megalithic tomb presents the typical "Emsland chambes" that are widespread in the area between the Dutch province of Drenthe in the west and the Weser in the east, which are very different from megalithic tombs in other regions: the burial chamber in east-west orientation is very long and consists of the juxtaposition of several components, the so-called yokes, each consisting of two opposing support stones and an overlying capstone. Here in Herßum there are 12 such yokes forming the 20-meter-long chamber. It is worth noting that the width of the chamber tapers from the middle to both ends: the clear width decreases from 2 meters in the middle to only 1.5 meters at the ends. Usually these chambers could be entered through a small corridor in the middle of the southern longitudinal wall, but no stones have survived from this passage. In a very narrow oval arch a stone enclosure surrounds the megalithic tomb, of which only 10 stones have been preserved. There are also a few stones missing from the existing 29 supporting stones; only a total of 6 stones are in their original place. All 12 capstones have slipped off the support stones and are inside the chamber. The absence of stones is due to explosions for the extraction of building materials in the 18th century and 19th century; in Herßum - it is said - such explosions took place in the years 1864/65. The megalithic tombs were used by a rural population over generations as burial places or ossuaries. The Neolithic people lived in village communities, where they lived in small ground-level post houses. Floor plans of such houses could be discovered during excavations in Heede and Groß Berßen. Cereals of this time were emmer, einkorn and barley. The grain stocks were stored in small storage tanks, which were probably raised to protect against vermin. Stone axes and hatchets were used for clearing forests and for woodworking. Their wooden stalks naturally did not survive in the soil. The pottery was thin-walled and well baked. As an ornament, geometric patterns had been inserted into the still unfired clay. Among the various shapes of vessels, the cup with high funnel-shaped edge is worth mentioning, which gave its name to the archaeological culture of that time: funnel beaker culture. Figure 1 shows vessels and stone axes and hatchets of this culture. In addition to agriculture and livestock, hunting continued to play a role. A variety of flint arrowheads, as shown in Figure 2, were attached to arrow shafts and were effective weapons, as shot tests have shown.

The megalithic tombs as a monumental grave architecture of this time are under the protection of the Lower Saxony Heritage Protection Law and must not be damaged.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
8th November 2018ce

Dun An Rudha Bhuide (Stone Fort / Dun)

Go to the end of the A846 at Ardbeg and go straight onto the minor road. Keep going until it ends as it heads north east. Jump over the gate and head north east, climbing slowly. After about a 1/4 mile Dun An Rubha Bhuide will be seen.

This is a tremendous fort with three lines of wall for defence and a natural harbour just to the north. Each wall is over 2m wide and on the outer, a gap which I stumbled through is probably the entrance. Like a lot of forts here, walls have been built to fill in natural defences.

Also there is, like a few other forts I visited, higher ground nearby i.e the direction I came from. So not much protection from the north, hence the walls.

But this is a beautiful place and its the end of the road (tarred).

Visited 30/7/2018.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th November 2018ce

Fuhrenkamp

In the forest area Fuhrenkamp, about 800m southwest of Oldendorfer Hünensteine three megalithic tombs are close together. However, all three are heavily destroyed, so that a visit is not worthwhile. Also, all three are hard to find because they are off the beaten path and you have to fight through the undergrowth to get to them. I strongly recommend to visit the tombs only with a GPS device.

Park at the B213 between Löningen and Lastrup, it is the same car park as for visting Oldendorfer Hünensteine . Walk southwest (towards Löningen) for about 275m, cross the B213 and then follow the wide forest path that leads north into the forest. After about 200m, the path forks for the first time, after 125m again, take the left path in each case. After additional 150m you have to look for noticeable hills in the woods to the right and left of the path.

During my visit, it started to rain heavily, mosquitoes came from everywhere, my pants were soaking wet due to the strong soil growth within a short time and to make matters worse, my cell phone reported that my car with all my valuables was not closed (which fortunately turned out as a false notification) and I couldn't locked it remotely. Those are the moments where one wonders why one takes all the effort for three unremarkable megalithic tombs.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce
Edited 8th November 2018ce

Fuhrenkamp 3

Fuhrenkamp 3 is better preserved than the other two tombs and lies south of them. Although this tomb is also heavily overgrown, one can still recognize that it must have been a chamber.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Fuhrenkamp 2

The tomb is only a few steps east of Fuhrenkamp 1. On a small hill, only four boulders are visible the remains of an approximately east-west oriented chamber.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Fuhrenkamp 1

The tomb is heavily destroyed, there are only single boulders which are lying on a hill around. Because of this finding Sprockhoff came to no clear reconstruction of the original appearance. Two burial chambers in a hill bank and an elongated burial chamber are possible.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Lahn 2

Lahn 2 is a heavily damaged megalithic tomb. There are only 4 stones left, where the actual tomb is no longer recognizable. Two of them might be supporting stones, one is a capstone and the fourth can not be clearly assigned.

To find the tomb drive from Lahn to Wehm and turn left into the field track Ginsterweg, just before a farm. At the end of the farm you turn right from the road, between the farm and the field. Shortly before the next property the tomb lies left in the woods.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Vrees 1 (Chambered Tomb)

The only, if only in remnants survived megalithic tomb in Vress are the Plingenberger Steine. There are still 3 capstones (one of which is incomplete), six supporting stones and a stone of the enclosure. 1895 were probably still 15 supporting stones available. The burial chamber is oriented in northwest-southeast direction. The length has to be at least 10 meters at 2 meters width.

To get to the tomb drive from Peheim to Vrees and turn right into Gehlenberger Weg and proceed northwards. After about 2.5 km turn right into a small road and continue for another 160 m . You should notice a small information board on the right. The tomb lies 30m behind this board in the wood.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Teufelssteine - Bischofsbrück

taken from the Route of Megalithic Culture information board:

This megalithic grave is a perfectly preserved treasure trove according to legend. Satan wanted to hide his treasures under the impressive capstones of this 6 x 1.5 metre chamber. Expert groups are puzzeld primarily by the enclosure because it is still undetermined whether it was rectangular or oval. But it differs distinctively from other sites in the area because of its size of 6 x 40 metres. It is said that the number of stones of this devilish monument changes constantly. However, this may easily checked by counting on site. And if one looks closely at least one inscription may be found - dated to the 20th century though.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Stüvenmühle 1

Stüvenmühle 1 is the only surviving tomb of formerly five megalithic tombs in the district of Stüvenmühle. The tomb lies on the western edge of Visbek near the stream Aue in the garden of the residential building of the estate Stüvenmühle. It is therefore not open for the public.

When I visited the site, the owner just arrived so I asked for permission to visit the tomb. I got the permission, but was not allowed to take any pictures and had to leave my photo at the entrance. The owner accompanied me and meticulously made sure that I did not take pictures with my cell phone. She explained it to me in conversation that people kept appearing unasked in their garden, climbing over fences and damaging them. Therefore, they do not want images of the site on the internet to encourage even more people to visit the tomb.

All in all this is a nice tomb, probably only the burial chamber of a former Hunebed, the enclosure is completely missing. But please respect the wish of the landowner and ask for permission, before you visit the site.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Bakenhus

To be honest during my visit 2018 there was not much to recognize of the megalithic tomb Bakenhus anymore, as the tomb is heavily overgrown in the meantime. During the planing of my visit I stumbled upon various images on various websites, were the tomb was show after some restoration / cleanup work 2007. It seems that since that no further maintenance work has been carried out, as the vegetation swallows the tomb now.

The tomb is nordwest-southeast oriented and spreads over 25m in a long, flat hill. Most of the support stones still seems to be present. To find the site drive from Ahlhorn on the B312 towards Wildeshausen. Right behind Ahlhorn turn left onto the K239 and drive northward for about 3.5 km. Turn right in the road Bakenhuser Esch and continue for about 165m. The tomb lies to the right in the wood, opposite of a riding facility.

It is a pity that evidently nobody cares about the tomb anymore.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th November 2018ce

Ffridd Isaf (Ring Cairn)

Coflein has it down as a ring cairn, but Kerb cairn would be a better lable, should one be absolutely necessary. This monument has me standing on the firmest ground all day, not the actual ground, a possible ring cairn, some possible hut circles, a possible stone row and standing stone. This is definitely a cairn, it has kerb stones on the outside, standing stones protrude through its outer mound, ok,
it could be a ring cairn, but a cairn, it very much is.

In the middle is a rectangular depression with a stone in it's side, it is the cist. The low mound that makes the ring has at least a dozen stones sticking up out of it, two of them are set side ways suggesting an entrance, all be it eight inches or so wide.
With kerb stones set into it's circumference, a kerbed ring cairn. It could be a small embanked stone circle, with a later cist inserted. It's better than I'm making out.

There is a lot of rocky clutter all around though making it a hard place to define, but I think I have it defined now.
The surroundings are pretty damn good. The lake sparkles in the late afternoon sun, and the mountains change colour with the passing of every cloud. Only the quarrying shenanigans gets on my nerves
postman Posted by postman
4th November 2018ce
Previous 25 | Showing 26-50 of 17,259 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 25