The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

East Riding of Yorkshire: Latest Posts

Previous 10 | Showing 11-20 of 264 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Willy Howe (Artificial Mound) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Willy Howe</b>Posted by postman<b>Willy Howe</b>Posted by postman<b>Willy Howe</b>Posted by postman<b>Willy Howe</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
18th February 2018ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by postman<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by postman<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by postman<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by postman<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
18th February 2018ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Cursuses relating to the Rudston Monolith


The Rudston cursus group consists of four cursuses stretching along the bottom and sides of the Great Wold Valley. At least one end of each of the monument are to be found on the elevated chalk ridges which surround Rudston. The valley contains the Gypsey Race, one of the rare streams across the chalklands, and two of the cursuses (A and C) cross this stream. The Rudston group contains an unparalleled concentration of cursus monuments. Cursus A is the southern most of the group. The southern end of the cursus survives as an earthwork and the remainder is visible on air photographs as two parallel ditches. The cursus is 2700 metres long by circa 58 metres, it tapers to 41 metres at the south terminal. Cursus A is the only one of the group where both ends are visible, both of the terminals are square in plan. The earthwork was excavated in the mid 19th century by Greenwell and showed what appeared to be a round barrow raised upon the surface of a long mound. This excavation produced six burials (two with Beakers), only one of which Greenwell considered to be primary, and a considerable amount of pottery. These burials were inserted into the south end of the cursus monument in the early bronze age. Greenwell also found sherds of earlier Neolithic pottery, along with worked flint and animal bones on the ground surface beneath the bank of the cursus. A second excavation across the west ditch in 1958 recovered 24 small pieces of Beaker pottery from the bottom 18 inches of the ditch fill, excluding the primary fill, and 4 larger pieces from the primary fill. There is evidence to suggest that the ditch was recut at this point explaining the presence of the later pottery.
moss Posted by moss
30th September 2017ce
Previous 10 | Showing 11-20 of 264 posts. Most recent first | Next 10