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Bredon Hill: Latest Posts

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Conderton Camp (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Conderton Camp</b>Posted by Rebsie<b>Conderton Camp</b>Posted by Rebsie Rebsie Posted by Rebsie
11th April 2012ce

Kemerton Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Kemerton Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Bambury Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Bambury Stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Bambury Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Miscellaneous

Description of the stone from "On The Ancient British, Roman, and Saxon Antiquities and Folk-Lore of Worcestershire" 2nd ed - Jabez Allies (1852):

"It is situated a little within the entrance of an oblong basin or amphitheatre, near the western focus of the ellipse, and is about twenty yards in circumference, four yards high, and nearly flat at the top. The basin resembles a dry dock, with its entrance upon the verge of the precipice of the hill, and is about two hundred yards in circumference. The stone, at several miles distance, looks something like the hull of a ship coming out of dock. I have no doubt that this basin is artificial, and that the earth and stones excavated were applied towards forming the inner agger of the camp, which is high and wide, and would take more materials in the making than could be obtained out of the vallum or trench. The stone is a mass of inferior oolite, the same as the rest of the hill, and no doubt was denuded upon the basin being dug, and most probably was preserved for an altar stone*. At the distance of about six yards before it, westward, nearer the precipice, there is another stone about eleven yards in circumference, and two yards above the surface; and about sixteen yards further westward, at the precipice, is a third stone, about ten yards in circumference,and two yards high. The former of these two stones was probably disturbed at the time of the excavation, as the stratification is nearly vertical, and the other appears to have been moved to the very edge of the (down which it seems on the point of rolling into Worcestershire), or the earth has, in the course of ages, fallen away from it down the precipice, and left it upon the brink. There is also another stone, behind and to the east of the Bambury stone, which measures about eight yards in circumference. All these stones are nearly in line with each other, and stand in an easterly and westerly direction; the one on the brink, stands on or near the site of the ancient granary.**"

*Mr Allies is keen on Druids.

**See miscellaneous entry under Kemerton Camp.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Bambury Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

In"On The Ancient British, Roman, and Saxon Antiquities and Folk-Lore of Worcestershire" 2nd ed (1852), Jabez Allies includes an entire chapter on the stone, including entymology of the name and a woodcut. He refers to a reference to the site in Laird's "Topographical and Historical Description of Worcestershire" (1814), which gives the opinion:

"Near the Prospect House, is Bramsbury Stone, an immense mass of rock, but of which there is no traditionary account; and which is, most likely, merely a natural production, without any reference to ancient events."

It is shown on Dr Nash's plan of the camp (1781) and on Greenwood's map (1820).

Allies gives a full description of the stone, which also mentions a line of other stones, nearly aligned with the Bambury Stone (as shown in his woodcut).

He concludes the chapter as follows:

"From all that has been said, and considering that Ambreley, Amberley, Ambresbury, and Ambury [as in Croft Ambrey ], are common names of old earth works all over the kingdom, it appears more than probable that Amber Stones stood at such places in primitive times, which gave the names thereto; and that the Banbury or Bambury Stone or Rock in Kemerton Camp, otherwise Bambury Camp, on the top of Bredon Hill, was one of these Ambrosiae Petrae, or Amber Stones, dedicated to the Sun by the Celtic Druids, either in imitation or independently of the form of worship of the Amonians, Phoenecians, or Tyrians. This would, if so, tend to confirm my idea that the Kemerton Camp is ancient British, although afterwards occupied by the Romans, Saxons, and Danes."

Not sure if any of this helps the question of "disputed antiquity" in any way shape or form!
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Conderton Camp (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

Dr. Treadway Russell Nash - "Collections for the History of Worcestershire" (1781):

"On Conderton Hill is a small oval camp, one hundred and sixty-five yards long, and seventy-one yards wide: tradition, which is better than conjecture*, supposes it to be Danish. Some few Roman coins have been found in the fields."

*Although presumably facts are better still than tradtion?
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Kemerton Camp (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

From "On The Ancient British, Roman, and Saxon Antiquities and Folk-Lore of Worcestershire" 2nd ed - Jabez Allies (1852):

"At a land-slip at the top of Bredon Hill, which happened at the beginning of the present century*, a considerable quantity of wheat, of a parched appearance, and which had been buried in the earth, was discovered. This is supposed to have been an ancient granary, but of what people is uncertain. A specimen of the wheat was presented to the Worcester Museum by Mrs. Davies, of Elmley Park. Wishing to know the particulars, I wrote to Mr. William Prior, of Kemerton, who, in reply, informed me that about thirty-five or forty years ago, after a very wet season, as the late Miss Martin, of Norton, was riding along the parapet on the top of Bredon Hill, in the field called Kemerton Camp, her horse began to sink in the ground suddenly and rapidly; that however she kept her seat, and the horse, which had gone down about four or five feet below the level of the firm ground, sprang up and regained his footing. That so soon as Miss Martin had recovered from her surprise, she saw that a land-slip had occurred, and that she had landed on the firm side of the chasm, which at that time opened about thirty feet wide at the surface and about forty feet deep**; but that it is since partially filled up by the crumbling down of the sides. That he was at the house of the late James Martin, Esq. of Overbury, some few weeks afterwards, when a portion of the parched wheat, found in the excavation, wa shown to him and some other gentlemen, and the general opinion was, that it was part of the stores left behind by the Romans, Saxons or Danes, at the time when they were there encamped.

*About the beginning of the last century, a hillock on the side of the hill, containing about an acre, with its trees and cattle, slipped nearly 100 yards down.
**Some say the chasm was about 200 yards long."

Inevitably there is a lengthy discussion on when and how the wheat came to be there, with far too many commas and the names of various local gentry Mr Allies spoke to. He concludes:

"Perhaps the best answer to the above is, that the ancient Britons parched their corn before placing it in subterranean granaries for long keeping*.; but whether it was parched in the ear and then thrashed out, or parched after it was thrashed, may be a question.

.....

*Similar subterranean granaries are mentioned by Tacitus in his account of the customs of the Germans."

Indeed. As a postscript, deposits of Iron Age wheat have been found on Bredon Hill during modern excavations, for example in association with infant burial in a post hole during a 1937 excavation ("The Excavation of the Iron Age Camp on Bredon Hill, Gloucestershire, 1935-1937" - T. Hencken).
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th February 2009ce

Kemerton Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Kemerton Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Kemerton Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
21st December 2008ce
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