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Lyneham Longbarrow (Long Barrow) — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

Neolithic long barrow and a standing stone. The barrow and stone are aligned south west-north east along a ridge with gives them a dominant position within the local landscape overlooking valleys to the north west and south east. The long barrow mound measures 32 metres in length and stands up to 1.75 metres high at its 19 metre wide north east end. At its tail, or south west end, it tapers away to ground level and measures just 4 metres wide. In 1894 a part excavation located two chambers on the south east side of the mound and at least one of these contained bone fragments, pottery and charcoal. Also found were two Anglo-Saxon burials which had been cut into the top of the existing mound. Unusually there was no evidence of flanking quarry ditches which are commonly found either side of long barrow mounds. Immediately north east, at a distance of 9 metres from the barrow mound, stands a single monolith, which was broken in 1923 but reset in its original location in 1924. This stands 1.8 metres high. There is no surviving evidence of other standing stones in the area and it is probable that the mound originally extended a further 9 metres to the location of the stone where a facade of standing stones would have stood. Scheduled.
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22nd May 2016ce

Enstone Long Barrow — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

SP 35702502. "Definite long barrow but destroyed. Five oolite slabs,said to have been in 'box-like' formation, moved by bulldozer in late 1960s after farmer had repeatedly struck them with the plough. May still be useful information buried. Market gardening on site means there are no useful cropmarks." (1 - 2)
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22nd May 2016ce

The Hoar Stone (Chambered Tomb) — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(3779 2375) Hoar Stone (NAT) Burial Chamber (NR). (1) A rectangular chamber consisting of three orthostats opening to the east, the southern orthostat is 9 ft high while the western and northern are 5 ft and 3 ft high respectively. To the east of the chamber are three prostrate megaliths which probably once formed part of the chamber. There is no trace of a barrow at present but Rudge describes the chamber as standing on a barrow 3 ft high (a). (2) Crawford quotes a full description from Dryden and includes his plan (see illustration) and notes that pottery, apparently Roman was found in a small excavation between the fallen stones. (3) In 1956, during excavations connected with a reservoir constructed near the Hoar Stone, a ditch more than 10 ft wide with sloping sides and about 3 ft deep was seen at G (see plan) running SW. This may conceivably have belonged to the monument and been part of a quarry-ditch of a small long barrow running NE to SW. The burial chamber would then lie on its SE flank toward its NE end. (4) The stones are disposed as described by Daniel and as he notes, the barrow has not survived. The site is hemmed in by a plantation and the reservoir is now grassed over. Published 1:2500 survey revised. See LS plan and photo. In care of DOE. (5)
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22nd May 2016ce

Leafield Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of Leafield barrow on Pastscape

(SP 31611541) Leafield Barrow (NAT) Tumulus (NR) (1) Leafield barrow. A round barrow, north of the village, 320ft in circumference, 11ft 6ins high on west end and 8ft on east. Grass-grown and planted with trees, it has the appearance of having been opened. (2) The mound stands in permanent pasture on the highest point of a low hill. It is egg-shaped with the large end towards the north west and has a flattened and disturbed top on which can be seen a low lateral bank that is probably recent. No traces of a ditch can be seen. An OS trig pillar stands on top and the north east side has been encroached upon by a reservoir. Certainly a substantial feature, but it cannot be said categorically to be a barrow. Published 1:2500 survey revised. (3) (SP 31601541) Leafield Barrow (NAT) (4) SP 316155. Leafield Barrow, round barrow, scheduled. (5) SP 31611540. Round barrow, c. 25m in diameter and 4m high, listed. (6) The motte, located on a small hill, measures 38 metres across and is 4 metres high. It has a flat oval summit and there is a square feature with an internal depression which has been interpreted as being the remains of a stone keep, similar to that at the nearby motte and bailey castle in Ascott d'Oyley. The motte is in the centre of a series of earthworks including medieval ridge and furrow cropmarks and the possible remains of a bailey. There is no evidence of a ditch around the base of the motte and the eastern side has been damaged by the building of a reservoir. Please note that the site has been identified as a motte castle whereas before it was believed to be a Bronze Age barrow. The previous sources all cite it as a barrow. (7) The Oxfordshire Historic Environment Record contains the same information stated in sources 1-7 but includes additional references and a number of photographs of the site. (8)
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22nd May 2016ce

Crawley (Long Barrow) — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SP 33711129) Long Barrow (NR). (1) Crawley. The remaining half of a long barrow, 107 ft long and 83 ft wide, was excavated by Akerman with two men for one day in 1857. Three skeletons were found lying east and west. At the waist of one of them was a small bronze buckle less than one inch in diameter. (2) Anglo-Saxon and now in the Ashmolean Museum (4). Crawford states, "The burials found by Akerman were clearly secondary interments of the Saxon period. There is no doubt that this is a genuine Long Barrow". (3) Later excavation in 1864 found skeletons and a few sherds of RB pottery, (5) now lost (6). Human remains and Roman coins have been found in the fields to the south and east. (2-6) Of the two terraces published on 25" only the west one survives; the other having been ploughed out and at present under cabbages. No remains are to be seen in the grass field south of the hedge. There is now nothing on the ground that can be identified as the remains of a long barrow. (7)
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22nd May 2016ce

Waterman's Lodge Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Details of barrow on Pastscape

SP 334182. An unrecorded round barrow (not visible on air-photos, RAF, 1947 and 1961). (1)
Oxford Museum with the same authorities note this site at SP 33341813. Perambulation located the mound at SP 33341810. Egg-shaped rather than round, with the thicker end to the south-west and no ditch. A forest ride abuts this south-west end but does not seem to have eroded it. Possibly a very short long barrow but its orientation is peculiar. Surveyed at 1:2500. (2)
SP 33341813. A mound, c. 14m in diameter and c. 2m high at Waterman's Lodge, listed as a round barrow. (3)
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22nd May 2016ce

Slatepits Copse Long Barrow — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SP 32891651) Long Barrow (NR) (1) Remains of Long Barrow rediscovered Oct 24th 1922. It lies 66 paces east of main north-south ride, at a point 240 paces south of point of intersection of the rides. It is 97ft long (taped) and about 6ft high (estimated). Oriented approximately east to west). At the eastern end are three large stones at right angles:- 'A' = 3ft 10ins actual height, 6ft 8ins wide, 1ins thick and 2ft 9ins vert height. 'C' appears to be 4ft 7ins wide, and is certainly 2ft 6ins, it is standing upright but partially covered. 'B' leans eastwards and is either a fallen lintel or upright of a chamber; 'A' and 'C' are 4ft 10ins apart. Digging west of chamber only and that evidently only superficial; well worth preservation and eventual excavation. Much black earth to south of mound. (2) Slate pits Copse: Long Barrow. (3) Located at SP 32901652, this barrow is much as described above. The cist is still clearly visivble and stone 'B' is almost certainly a leaning upright. The dark earth is at present covered by dense seasonal undergrowth. Resurveyed at 1:2500. (4) SP 330165. Slate pits Copse long barrow, scheduled. (5)
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22nd May 2016ce

Churchill Copse Long Barrow — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SP 33191688) Long Barrow in Churchill Copse (note name) is a long barrow though a short one (24 paces). Its position is incorrectly shown in the VCH, from which it was plotted here (since corrected). It stands on north side of the long and straight riding (east-west), 115 paces west of the north-south riding. It has been dug all along the middle and across the middle; no ditches or big stones. Maximum height about 3ft 4ins; oriented east to west. (1)
This barrow is at SP 33171685 but is otherwise as described above. Surveyed at 1:2500. (2)
(SP 33171685) Long Barrow (NR) (3)
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22nd May 2016ce

Well Ground Long Barrow — Miscellaneous

Details of long barrow on Pastscape

SP 3141 1852. A long barrow on Well Ground, SE of Ascott-under-Wychwood village was discovered by John Campbell in October 1976 and surveyed in April 1977 (see illustration card). It sits on a spur facing NW and jutting into Evenlode Valley. The
mound is about 55-60m across with ditch most clearly visible to the north. Plough damage has almost totally destroyed any signs of the west end of the mound. (1)
The long barrow has been the subject of previous archaeological field investigation. The remains of an extant mound and quarry ditches were first described and surveyed by bond and Campbell in 1976/7. Subsequently the barrow was inspected by Brown in 1978, who further notes the presence of a mound, 60m long and 25m wide, with extant quarry ditches, but describes that extensive plough damage had virtually removed the western end of the barrow. It would appear that the continued ploughing of the barrow has now removed any above ground evidence of the mound and to have infilled its associated quarry ditches. It is further uncertain as to the extent of disturbance that has been caused to below ground archaeological deposits as a result of cultivation. (2)
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22nd May 2016ce

Bladon Camp (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

Details of hillfort on Pastscape

(SP 457138) Round Castle [NAT] Camp [NR] (1) Round Castle: a probable Iron Age hill fort of oval shape covering an area of about 2 1/2 acres. It had two lines of banks and ditches, but subsequent embanking and ditching make it impossible to be
exact about them, or about the position of its entrance. (2) The outer bank is slight, but the inner bank, of which only
a portion remains, measures 5ft in height from the bottom of the ditch. (3)
The remaining features of this probably originally bivallate enclosure are an almost complete internal bank with a recently
recut ditch and incomplete outerwork consisting again of a recut ditch but with a substantial scarp to the inside. These recent ditches pose a problem in that they virtually obliterate, or render difficult to identify, the extent of the original ditches; for this reason they are not, except where certainly part of the earthwork, shown on the survey. A further difficult in identification is caused by digging and surface quarrying around the west and north sides of the earthworks. As a result of material dumped in linear mounds it is impossible from visual inspection to ascertain which, if any, represent the alignments of the original banks.The site falls on the summit of a slight rise and though probably an IA fort the name "hillfort" in this instance is a misnomer. Divorced survey at 1:2500. (4)
SP 4570 1399. Salvage excavation of a section through the rampart showed it was constructed of clay with sand dump line, faced by thin stone walls 6m apart. Burning had taken place at the front of the ramparts. Early Iron Age pottery was obtained from the old ground surface. (5)
SP 45681380. The remains of a small multivallate hillfort known as Bladon camp. The hillfort defences include two concentric oval ramparts with outer ditches, enclosing an area up to 200 metres by 180 metres. Both ramparts are of stone rubble construction, partly levelled. The ditches have become partly infilled over time. The original entrances are not clearly defined but were probably located to the north western and south eastern sides of the site. A partial excavation was undertaken in 1988 and Early Iron Age pottery was recovered from the bottom of the ditch. Scheduled. (6)
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22nd May 2016ce
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